Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Steve Foss

A day of grouse, flowing water and mushrooms. Oh yeah, light too . . .

18 posts in this topic

Hey all:

Headed up the Echo Trail this afternoon. Tried to entice Ken, but he had a wedding to shoot. Where are his priorities, I ask you? gringrin

A whole gamut of lenses and conditions and subjects. Hope you enjoy.

Young male spruce grouse

Canon 20D, Canon 400 f5.6L, iso1600, 1/125 af f5.6, handheld

2893395489_f7796c010b_o.jpg

Mushroom and moss

Canon 30D, Canon 135 f2.8 softfocus, Kenko extension tubes, iso320, 1/125 at f2.8, handheld, diffuser disc

2894236194_32bd60cdac_o.jpg

A trio (each mushroom smaller than my pinkie fingernail)

30D, Canon 100 f2.8 macro, iso100, 10 sec at f29, tripod, remote shutter release, mirror lock-up, diffuser

2893393569_95bcba0384_o.jpg

From underneath

30D, 100 macro, iso100, .5 sec at f11, remote release, MLU

2893394389_c9e20f7c4e_o.jpg

All the colors

30D, Canon 70-200 f2.8L at 145mm, iso400, 1/160 at f8, circular polarizer, tripod, two images stitched into this pano

2893392203_31f275983e_o.jpg

Water, rocks and motion I

20D, 70-200 at 100mm, iso100, 5 sec at f32, tripod, remote release, MLU, circular polarizer

2894232890_605e2ee9b1_o.jpg

Water, rocks and motion II

20D, 70-200 at 110mm, iso100, 2.5 sec at f32, tripod, remote release, MLU, CPL

One note: This and the previous image are different compositions of the same cascade. You'll see differences in color between them. This second image has the more accurate color.

2893390447_56cfb5d0d2_o.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought about you all day while I was inside taking pictures! Glad to see you found a place to use the polarizer. I think the grouse is outstanding and also like the first cotton water shot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Ken. Hope the wedding went well. I think the Mrs. and I will be heading out the Echo again this afternoon.

I ended up spending a couple hours passing stories with the C.O. who moved over to this area a couple years back. He was really big into nature photography quite a few years ago and would like to get back into it. It was so late (full dark) when I pulled away (turns out he worked in NW Minn for several years and we knew a lot of the same cops and C.O.s from when I covered crime at the GF Herald and had lots of stories to share) I knew Mrs. Catfish would be worried.

It was a fast drive to get into cell phone range after that, and of course there was that tone in her voice when I got through. You know the one. Gotta make it up to her a little bit, you know? gringrin

I hope that darn polarizer gets here (backordered) before I have to borrow yours again. I don't know what possessed me to sell mine when I sold the 100-400. I'm sure more senior moments like that will be in store. crazy

I used the softfocus lens on that one mushroom as an experiment. Borrowed it for a weekend, but don't think I want to buy one. You can do pretty much the same thing in Photoshop these days, but it was fun to goof around with it.

If you can pull away for a day next weekend, I don't have anything booked and we can poke around the Echo or the Tomahawk. The maples are peaking right now, and the aspens/birches should be peaking next weekend. What you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve,

I'll be in touch with you later today, but could you pull away for a couple of days next weekend?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grouse shot is nice in that lichen!

1st 'shroom.. killer background and so easy on the eyes

2nd & 3rd 'shroom... nice comp!

pano of birch mixed w/colors is is just having a good eye!

water shots... silky like I like them!

Very nice series!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve, those are really great! My favs are the first mushroom and the first water images. They are top notch as always.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the grouse and Motion 1. Not that I don't like rest, but these are my faves. It's also a different perspective on the pano, one I would never have even considered. It definitely works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

im very new to photography baught my first camera this summer but like it a lot ... how do you get the water to look like that? thats awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everybody!

Lindyrig, there's plenty of time to take up photography when you have the time. No hurry. smilesmile

chuckwagon, Ken's tips are right on. It's really pretty simple as long as you have a solid tripod and at least a circular polarizing filter. The key is a long exposure time. That's what you want, and everything described is aimed at getting those long exposures and keeping the camera steady as the shutter is open to avoid blur.

You said you were a newby, so please don't be offended if this sounds a little basic. smile

First, the lowest iso your camera can do (usually 100, but sometimes lower depending on which camera you've got). Then stop your aperture down as far as it will go (check you manual on how to adjust aperture if you're used to shooting on full auto and don't know how). Stopping down aperture means a higher f-stop number. The longer the telephoto lens used, in general, the smaller you can get your aperture. So if you can make a composition using a 200mm lens you might get an aperture of f39 instead of the f22 you'd get from most wide angle lenses. The reason for the tiny apertures is to let in less light, which requires the shutter to be open a longer time.

That's also why we put on a circular polarizing filter, and/or a neutral density filter, to let in less light and force a longer exposure. The longer the exposure, the more the movement of the water passing through the frame will look cottony. And by making sure you have some rock or tree elements in the frame, you'll make a prettier picture because the fuzzy cotton water will be contrasted by the sharp rocks/tree trunks.

You need a solid tripod and can't bump it at all during the exposure so the sharp objects don't get blurred from camera shake.

You also can use a remote shutter release to keep your finger from shaking the camera when you trip the shutter, but if you don't have one your camera's self timer will work just fine.

Most cameras allow you to lock up the mirror. This can be good because at slow shutter speeds, when the shutter is tripped the mirror slapping up out of the way causes a little bit of camera shake. Check your manual to see if your camera has this option. It's very important on exposures from, say, 1/4 second to 2 seconds, but less so on much longer exposures, because the slight tremble from the slap over the course of an 8 second exposure is very miniscule.

I use manual focus and adjust focus on the front portion of the image. With apertures that stopped down, generally the whole image is in focus if you pick a foreground element to focus on.

Then it's just a matter of experimenting and trying it out, making sure you check your histogram on the back of the camera (assuming yours is digital). If you get blinkies on your screen from blown out water highlights, you can use exposure compensation (again check owner's manual to see how to view the histogram and use EC) to underexpose until those blown out areas go away.

It's almost a must to do this on a cloudy day, or toward sunrise or sunset when the sun is off the water. On a sunny day, you generally can't get slow enough shutter speeds because of the bright light, but even if you stack enough filters to achieve the right shutter speeds, the reflection of sun off the water will produce a bunch of squiggly little hot bright lines that are very distracting.

I was able to do these fuzzy water images in late afternoon on a sunny day because the river I was photographing is down a bit in a shallow gorge, so shade creeps in pretty early. Even so, if I'd waited until the river bottom was very dark, say right before sunset, I probably could have gotten exposures of 10 seconds or longer.

So there it is. Lots of fun to be had, lots of experimentation. gringrin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good work Steve! They're all excellent, but I'm going with the water shots as my fav.'s!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the information guys haha no offence taken here all that info is great. your pictures are very very nice i would to get to better with the camera and get some forum worthey pics to post thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Way to go team!! I sure took the avg score down with my jake
    • nice story, fishing has a way of easing the pains we have. even when we hurt like crazy when done for the day we are looking forward to the next outing.
    • way to go, guys yep, the toms not about to give up even though its close to closing time have seen several strutters the past couple weeks and heard gobbles yesterday while fishing
    • great job. makes it 5 for 5 for team 5 congrats on a nice tom, 57 and that willl give our team score a boost
    • One More Cast      Photo by:  Roger Abraham   If any of you out there are regular readers of my tales, you have followed my recent struggles with back and knees.  I can’t put a name to this drive I have to be on the stream as of late.  It borders on obsession. I guess in my mind if I am healthy enough to fish the world is right with me and I am not getting old and feeble.      Today I was a witness to that I am not the only one.  Lots of anglers and hunters live to go out into the outdoors. .  It is what drives them.  It makes them feel alive.  It is their passion.  I told my fishing buddy Abe today my thoughts.  I told him how I was feeling a little old.  I guess my 60th birthday coming up next month makes me feel mortal.  Abe laughed and said I was a young buck compared to him.  Abe turns 76 this year.     Abe told me tales about catching big trout in tiny streams in Wisconsin and out west.  The twinkle in his eye when he reminisced I had seen before in many trout anglers.      We fished a stretch for 2 hours.  I sat down and rested often.  Abe kept on fishing. He got hung up in a box elder branch and lost a lure.  Abe told me box elders trees were his nemesis when he fished.   He asked me which tree was my kryptonite.  I told him, "ones with branches."  We both had a chuckle and continued fishing.   I thought to myself this guy is really driven.  I hope I am like him at 76.     We got to the vehicle and Abe wanted to continue fishing.  Abe’s waders sprang a leak earlier and he fell in the water a couple times.  He was quite wet.  He wanted to change in to dry clothes before we continue.  Abe peeled off his wet shirt and there were two things stuck to his chest.  He could tell by my questioning look he needed to tell me what was up.     Abe told me he had been having heart problems lately and he was supposed to be wearing a heart monitor.  He left it in the car because he was afraid of getting the electronics wet.  Here I have been whining about being old and the guy I was fishing with left his heart monitor in his vehicle.      Abe reassured me that he was in no danger and he could continue fishing.  I started brainstorming on a place to fish where it was not so hard walking.  Now that I knew he was not as healthy as he looked I wanted an easy place to fish.  I knew the place and it was upstream 5 miles.     We arrived at the well manicured field.  It looked like a golf green.  I picked the area because the farmer kept sheep and goats on the land and the weeds and brush were gone because of the goats.  We walked and fished.     Abe told tales of the old days and of fish lost and landed.  I walked a little forward to fish and looked back to check up on Abe.  What I saw when I looked back scared me and I immediately asked Abe if he was ok.  Abe was laying flat on the ground face down.  I thought the worst and he could tell by my face.  He told me to calm down.  His back was acting up and he needed to straight it out and that was the best way to do it.   We fished a little bit more and he took a photo of me.  He liked the lighting. He told me it captured the essence of trout fishing.  He did not have a camera.  I let him use mine.  He was not camera savvy and needed an impromptu lesson on how to use it.   We drove to his car and we talked about our love of the outdoors. We shook hands and headed our separate ways and promised to fish again soon.  As I drove home I smiled and thought about how I am going to be when I am 76.  I hope I am like Abe and my eyes still twinkle when I talk of chasing trout and I am still driven to make one more cast.
    • The past week has had me having multiple close calls and missing a brute at 45 yards.  Tonight I talked my dad to give it another try and there were birds in the field when we got there.  Birds ended up leaving as we tried to sneak in.  A short 20 minutes later they were back and we watched and worked the big group of toms and hens for more than 2 hours before we got one to commit.  Dad shot him with his 20 gauge at 48 yards,(this thing shoots an awesome pattern).  The 3 year old was down and only flopped a few times.   Nice 1+ inch spurs, 10" beard and heavy.  A good evening for sure!
    • Sorry to disappoint guys, but this tom was not my first bird of the season. Apparently that's part of the rules. The score won't count towards the team. I don't have any measurements for the jake I shot so we will have a zero from me.    At least my freezer is full. 
    • Way to  go 1957 !! Congrats!!
    • sugar is not a drug. 
  • Our Sponsors