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bigbluepirahna

223 vs. 22-250

13 posts in this topic

What has more knock down power... .223 or a 22-250.

What has more recoil/noise... .223 or a 22-250.

On a quick look it appeared .223 has heavier grain ammo more readily available in the stores, which caliber actually has higher grain ammo easily available.

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I would say 22-250 has more knock down power as far as recoil and noise I have no clue. I think they are both easy to get ammo. Will probably really be easy to get some this deer season with the new laws.

If you realy want to know a good answer look at all the populor ammo guys web sites. Happy Hunting!

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The 22-250 burns a lot more powder than the .223. The reason you will see more loads with heavy bullets for the .223 is the .223 is a service round used by competitors in match shoots. The heavier bullets do better at longer distances in the wind. The popularity of AR-15 type rifles has pushed the manufacturers to put out a wider variety of loads for the smaller .223.

One thing to keep in mind is the heavier bullets in the .223 require a faster twist to the rifling of the barrel. A lot of AR type rifles have 1 in 7 rates of twist for using bullets over 65 grains. The standard rate of twist for most bolt guns in .223 is usually closer to 1 in 12.

Since you asked which has more knock down power the simple answer is the 22-250 by a wide margin. It also makes more noise and probably kicks more. Neither round is much for recoil even from a light gun.

If you are wondering which would make a better deer rifle the 22-250 would have the most power and flatter trajectory. If you are thinking of using either round for deer you need to stay away from certain bullet types. These rounds use the same bullets most of which are designed to vaporize prarie dogs or harvest fur. The plastic tipped and hollow point explosive bullets WILL NOT PENETRATE RELIABLY ON A DEERS VITALS. A couple of other types of bullet available are the full metal jacket and match hollow point neither of which is suitable for larger game.

There are several bullets available for 22 centerfires that are intended for deer size game. Noslers partition is available in a 60 grain bullet and Barnes has a 53 grain XFB. There are probably others. Several ammo companies are now loading these types of bullets in both cartidges.

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I shoot a .22-250 a lot at the gun range. A lot of shooters have told me that it has a lot of bark to it compared to the .223 bolt actions they shoot. As for recoil it is not much, I shoot 20-30 at times and wouldn't even know it. 45 and 50 grain bullets tend to have a great deal of wind drift. Also like mentioned the .22-250 uses more powder, and the 45, and 50 grain bullets move at 3800-4000 fps unless you reload your own. Being a hot load at that rate of speed heats my barrel up fast when target shooting so a lot of time is used between shots so I don't burn the barrel out. As mentioned this cal. doesn't make a very good big game rifle due to the small grain bullet, not to say it wouldn't kill big game but it just doesn't have the penitration power.

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The gun would be used for deer mechanictim. I am looking at the Ruger 1-B single shot 223. I shoot a 30-06 myself, and have twin daughters coming up that will be asking to hunt with daddy. Normally I would've just got them a 243, but I was talking an ex-law enforcement guy who told me he used to shoot hundreds of deer to control city populations. He said they were instructed to neck shoot the deer with a 223. Never had a problem with the caliber being lethal for deer.

Want to get everyones thoughts on here, if the general consensus is that it's not enough gun, I'll probably go for a Ruger #1 in 243. -Thanks.

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.223

Velocity max = approx 3100 fps 1280 ft lbs @ muzzle with 60 gr bullet

2738 fps 999 ft lbs @ 100 yds

22-250

Velocity max = approx 3500 fps 1632 ft lbs @ muzzle with 60 gr bullet

3104 fps 1284 ft lbs @ 100 yds

I personally don't feel that a .22 cal is enough to effectively and consistently take deer sized game. The exception to that rule would be an individual who is well trained and suited to place the shot were it needs to be. Your law enforcement buddy is of that sort. The neck is a low percentage shot and I would dare say that most folks can't make that shot. The neck is essentially a spine shot which is approximately 2" across and that is a pretty small target.

I have a niece who started hunting with a .308 chambered in a NEF single shot and she had no problem handling the recoil. Even if the shot was less than perfect, the animal was down in a fairly short time.

If I was selling a gun to you for your girls it would be something no smaller then .243 and no bigger than .308. I would also lean more towards the .308. The .243 is basically a .308 on a diet.

.243 Win. is a .308 Win. that has been necked down to .243. A 100 gr .243 carries about 32 grains of powder and a .308 carries about 43 grains of powder with a 150 gr bullet.

Just my 2 cents. I hope your girls have fun and good luck this season.

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I really don't think the .22 centerfires are deer guns either, but to answer your question the 22-250 is a lot more shell than a .223. Matched with the right premium bullet and with proper shot placement it can be a relatively effective cartridge on whitetails but I'd still prefer a little bigger caliber.

Personally I'd go .243 or 25-06 for your girls with the .308 being another option to consider depending upon the type of shots they'll take.

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there are also wildcats/less used rounds that you can throw into the mix,that seem to have the balistics to hit that happy ballancing point where the light loads meet the heavy loads. off balistics and no personal shooting expierence, don't through out rounds like the 6.5 creedmore, or .223 Arnold, .257 roberts... hit up some reloading manuals and just look at balistics, Ruger No. 1's are chambered in nearly every caliber in reloading manuals, and if ya can't find one you want, the TC Encore is an alternative and thier custom shop keeps the oddball barrels in stock, just not mass marketed, or will make one just for you.

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I think love to hunt hit it right square on the nose with 243 being the min. and 308 max. 7mm08 and 260 are also great rounds. And stay away from that neck shot!!

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I think the very best deer rifle for youngsters and smaller people is the 6.5 swede. You can buy the swede as a surplus gun and customize it cheaply. It doesn't recoil as much as a .243 and I've seen it knock down big white tails, muleys and many elk. The only draw back is the 6.5 mauser is usually only found in right hand.

I have my FFL and have sold dozens of these nice rifles. I have one customized for myself and it shoots nickel size groups with almost any ammo.

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