Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Swill

From our friends at PETA

36 posts in this topic

Ok this is a long one, but worth scanning over....

Why Sport Hunting Is Cruel and Unnecessary

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Although it was a crucial part of humans’ survival 100,000 years ago, hunting is now nothing more than a violent form of recreation that the vast majority of hunters does not need for subsistence.(1) Hunting has contributed to the extinction of animal species all over the world, including the Tasmanian tiger and the great auk.(2,3)

Less than 5 percent of the U.S. population hunts, yet hunting is permitted in many wildlife refuges, national forests, state parks, and on other public lands.(4) Forty percent of hunters slaughter and maim millions of animals on public land every year, and by some estimates, poachers kill just as many animals illegally.(5,6)

Pain and Suffering

Many animals suffer prolonged, painful deaths when they are injured but not killed by hunters. A member of the Maine Bowhunters Alliance estimates that 50 percent of animals who are shot with crossbows are wounded but not killed.(7) A study of 80 radio-collared white-tailed deer found that of the 22 deer who had been shot with “traditional archery equipment,” 11 were wounded but not recovered by hunters.(8) Twenty percent of foxes who have been wounded by hunters are shot again; 10 percent manage to escape, but “starvation is a likely fate” for them, according to one veterinarian.(9) A South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks biologist estimates that more than 3 million wounded ducks go “unretrieved” every year.(10) A British study of deer hunting found that 11 percent of deer who’d been killed by hunters died only after being shot two or more times and that some wounded deer suffered for more than 15 minutes before dying.(11)

Hunting disrupts migration and hibernation patterns and destroys families. For animals like wolves, who mate for life and live in close-knit family units, hunting can devastate entire communities. The stress that hunted animals suffer—caused by fear and the inescapable loud noises and other commotion that hunters create—also severely compromises their normal eating habits, making it hard for them to store the fat and energy that they need in order to survive the winter.

Blood-Thirsty and Profit-Driven

To attract more hunters (and their money), federal and state agencies implement programs—often called “wildlife management” or “conservation” programs—that are designed to boost the number of “game” species. These programs help to ensure that there are plenty of animals for hunters to kill and, consequently, plenty of revenue from the sale of hunting licenses.

Duck hunters in Louisiana persuaded the state wildlife agency to direct $100,000 a year toward “reduced predator impact,” which involved trapping foxes and raccoons so that more duck eggs would hatch, giving hunters more birds to kill.(12) The Ohio Division of Wildlife teamed up with a hunter-organized society to push for clear-cutting (i.e., decimating large tracts of trees) in Wayne National Forest in order to “produce habitat needed by ruffed grouse.”(13)

In Alaska, the Department of Fish and Game is trying to increase the number of moose for hunters by “controlling” the wolf and bear populations. Grizzlies and black bears have been moved hundreds of miles away from their homes; two were shot by hunters within two weeks of their relocation, and others have simply returned to their homes.(14) Wolves have been slaughtered in order to “let the moose population rebound and provide a higher harvest for local hunters.”(15) In the early 1990s, a program designed to reduce the wolf population backfired when snares failed to kill victims quickly and photos of suffering wolves were seen by an outraged public.(16)

Nature Takes Care of Its Own

The delicate balance of ecosystems ensures their own survival—if they are left unaltered. Natural predators help maintain this balance by killing only the sickest and weakest individuals. Hunters, however, kill any animal whom they would like to hang over the fireplace—including large, healthy animals who are needed to keep the population strong. Elephant poaching is believed to have increased the number of tuskless animals in Africa, and in Canada, hunting has caused bighorn sheep’s horn size to fall by 25 percent in the last 40 years; Nature magazine reports that “the effect on the populations’ genetics is probably deeper.”(17)

Even when unusual natural occurrences cause overpopulation, natural processes work to stabilize the group. Starvation and disease can be tragic, but they are nature’s ways of ensuring that healthy, strong animals survive and maintain the strength level of the rest of their herd or group. Shooting an animal because he or she might starve or become sick is arbitrary and destructive.

“Sport” hunting not only jeopardizes nature’s balance, it also exacerbates other problems. For example, the transfer of captive-bred deer and elk between states for the purpose of hunting is believed to have contributed to the epidemic spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD). As a result, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has given state wildlife agencies millions of dollars to “manage” deer and elk populations.(18) The fatal neurological illness that affects these animals has been likened to mad cow disease, and while the USDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention claim that CWD has no relationship to any similar diseases that affect humans or farmed animals, the slaughter of deer and elk continues.(19,20)

Another problem with hunting involves the introduction of exotic “game” animals who, if they’re able to escape and thrive, pose a threat to native wildlife and established ecosystems. After a group of nonnative wild boars escaped from a private ranch and moved into the forests of Cambria County, Pa., the state of Pennsylvania drafted a bill prohibiting the importation of all exotic species of animals.(21)

Canned Cruelty

Most hunting occurs on private land, where laws that protect wildlife are often inapplicable or difficult to enforce. On private lands that are set up as for-profit hunting reserves or game ranches, hunters can pay to kill native and exotic species in “canned hunts.” These animals may be native to the area, raised elsewhere and brought in, or purchased from individuals who are trafficking in unwanted or surplus animals from zoos and circuses. They are hunted and killed for the sole purpose of providing hunters with a “trophy.”

Canned hunts are becoming big business—there are an estimated 1,000 game preserves in the U.S.(22) Ted Turner, who owns more land than any other landowner in the country, operates 20 ranches, where hunters pay thousands of dollars to kill bison, deer, African antelopes, and turkeys.(23)

Animals on canned-hunting ranches are often accustomed to humans and are usually unable to escape from the enclosures that they are confined to, which range in size from just a few yards to thousands of acres. Most of these ranches operate on a “no kill, no pay” policy, so it is in owners’ best interests to ensure that clients get what they came for. Owners do this by offering guides who are familiar with animals’ locations and habits, permitting the use of dogs, and supplying “feeding stations” that lure unsuspecting animals to food while hunters lie in wait.

Only a handful of states prohibit canned hunting, and there are no federal laws regulating the practice at this time.(24) Congress is considering an amendment to the Captive Exotic Animal Protection Act that would prohibit the transfer, transportation, or possession of exotic animals “for entertainment or the collection of a trophy.”(25)

‘Accidental’ Victims

Hunting “accidents” destroy property and injure or kill horses, cows, dogs, cats, hikers, and other hunters. In 2006, Vice President Dick Cheney famously shot a friend while hunting quail on a canned-hunting preserve.(26) According to the International Hunter Education Association, there are dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries attributed to hunting in the United States every year—and that number only includes incidents involving humans.(27) It is an ongoing problem, and one warden explained that “hunters seem unfamiliar with their firearms and do not have enough respect for the damage they can do.”(28)

A Humane Alternative

There are 30 million deer in the U.S., and because hunting has been an ineffective method to “control” populations (one Pennsylvania hunter “manages” the population and attracts deer by clearing his 600-acre plot of wooded land and planting corn), some wildlife agencies are considering other management techniques.(29,30) Several recent studies suggest that sterilization is an effective, long-term solution to overpopulation. A method called TNR (trap, neuter, and return) has been tried on deer in Ithaca, N.Y., and an experimental birth-control vaccine is being used on female deer in Princeton, N.J.(31,32) One Georgia study of 1,500 white-tailed deer on Cumberland Island concluded that “if females are captured, marked, and counted, sterilization reduces herd size, even at relatively low annual sterilization rates.”(33)

What You Can Do

Before you support a “wildlife” or “conservation” group, ask about its position on hunting. Groups such as the National Wildlife Federation, the National Audubon Society, the Sierra Club, the Izaak Walton League, the Wilderness Society, and the World Wildlife Fund are pro-sport-hunting or, at the very least, they do not oppose it.

To combat hunting in your area, post “no hunting” signs on your land, join or form an anti-hunting organization, protest organized hunts, and spread deer repellent or human hair (from barber shops) near hunting areas. Call 1-800-448-NPCA to report poachers in national parks to the National Parks and Conservation Association. Educate others about hunting. Encourage your legislators to enact or enforce wildlife-protection laws, and insist that nonhunters be equally represented on the staffs of wildlife agencies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I think that just given PETA ths kind of attention is just what they want.

Let the nuts die quitely in a corner!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I think that just given PETA ths kind of attention is just what they want.

Let the nuts die quitely in a corner!

Agreed. My concern over Peta's positions or activities is just a little ways down my to do list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright allready, I see the light. I'm done hunting and fishing forever and will begin to make reperations for my irrehensible acts aginst the planet. Who do I talk to?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True, PETA is low on most of our lists, but they have huge amounts of money, support, and influence.

So who can we support that will counter PETA's activism?

This must be a topic both sides of the political party can agree on? I hope.... cool

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After the anticipated (By some) 2012 apocolyose where 90% of the earths population will die. Hunting may be the only form of survival and those who have the skills will do best. PETA members of course will not do well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright allready, I see the light. I'm done hunting and fishing forever and will begin to make reperations for my irrehensible acts aginst the planet. Who do I talk to?

I'll take all your hunting and fishing gear. grin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Animals on canned-hunting ranches are often accustomed to humans and are usually unable to escape from the enclosures that they are confined to, which range in size from just a few yards to thousands of acres."

A few yards huh? Might as well said they were tied up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well well well, aren't they just a bunch of neat people, just like my signature

PETA = People Eating Tasty Animals

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a little sample from our friends at Humane Society of the U.S.

"Against All Hunting – In their Own Words"

Here it is - HSUS wants to stop ALL sport hunting, not just bear hunting, in the words of their leader, and from their own HSOforum:

"If we could shut down all sport hunting in a moment, we would." – Wayne Pacelle, as quoted by the Associated Press in Impassioned Agitator, December 30, 1991.

"Our goal is to get sport hunting in the same category as cock fighting and dog fighting." – Wayne Pacelle, as quoted in the Bozeman Daily Chronicle, October 8, 1991.

"Sport hunting—the killing of wild animals as recreation—is fundamentally at odds with the values of a humane, just and caring society." – HSUS HSOforum 2003.

About HSUS’ Plans and Strategy to Stop All Hunting - Here’s what Wayne Pacelle, HSUS Senior Vice President, had to say:

"We are going to use the ballot box and the democratic process to stop all hunting in the United States… We will take it species by species until all hunting is stopped in California. Then we will take it state by state." – Wayne Pacelle, quoted in an interview published in the magazine Full Cry, October 1990.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get to know what these radical activists are all about.

Read more from some other anti-hunting groups . . .

"Friends of Animals"

Position Statement on Hunting:

"Hunting is cruel. It is deceitful. It is socially unjustifiable. It is ecologically disruptive. Friends of Animals opposes hunting in all its forms."

"The cruelty of hunting involves the causing of gratuitous pain to wild animals."

"Friends of Animals is unequivocally against hunting and the destructive methods of "wildlife management" that caters to, and fosters hunting. Hunting is an act against Nature on both moral and biological grounds."

"Maine Friends of Animals"

On hunting with dogs - "The dogs chase and tree the quarry, and the trophy hunter shoots the exhausted and frightened animal from a tree."

"American Humane"

On sport hunting:

"American Humane opposes the hunting of any living creature . . . Sport hunting is a form of exploitation of animals . . . American Humane calls for action to be taken to prevent such cruelty"

They even hate Dog Sledding, because it "subjects dogs to inhumane training and handling practices"

"All-Creatures.org"

"We are dedicated to cruelty-free living through a vegetarian-vegan lifestyle"

On animals - "We feel pain just like you do. Please don't catch and eat us."

"Stop eating and wearing animal products."

"Both the human rights movement and the animal rights movement seek the same end -- a code of behavior that optimally benefits all members of the society. Like all rights movements, the animal rights movement asks that society broaden its definition of itself to include members previously excluded due their "inferior" status."

"CASH - Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting"

CASH shows us how these groups see the future – that of one hunting ban after another, until hunting no longer exists. All these activist groups follow this approach. So don’t believe them when they say they only want to stop one particular form of bear hunting – they will be back time and time again:

"The mission of C.A.S.H. - Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting - is to accomplish what its name says in the shortest possible time. Understanding that abolishing hunting entails a process, a series of steps taken and not a single action that would effect our goal overnight, a time frame cannot be established. We hope for building a succession of wins, and if not wins immediately then at least a succession of stirrings of consciousness. We hope to encourage those who are still silent to speak out, awakening community after community about the heavy hand of state and federal wildlife management agencies. We hope to alter whatever belief still exists that sport hunters are conservationists and champions of the environment to a realization that they are destroyers of wildlife and ecosystems in the narrow and broad sense. Where the natural feeling for wildlife doesn't exist, we strive to engender among citizens outrage that their own rights are violated by legal hunting and that their quality-of-life diminished." – CASH HSOforum 2003.

On Animal Rights - "We do not think of animals in the wild as "meat," but rather feeling (sentient) beings who deserve to, and desire to, live out their lives."

Or about hunting cougars with dogs - "Like all hunting, hunting cougars with dogs is cruel and inhumane."

On fishing - This New York group doesn’t stop with hunting, they won’t even support the right to fish in New York, a state where shoreline landowners apparently have the right to stop fishing in the waters off their shores. CASH recently fought actively against fishing:

"STOP NEW YORK'S "RIGHT TO FISH" BILL! - Bill A. 2260 (introduced by Assemblyman Pete Grannis) the "right-to-fish" bill has passed in the Assembly and is now being considered by the Senate Environmental Conservation Committee. It is going through the Senate under its Assembly number. The bill allows "public fishing from a vessel on all waterways of the state that are navigable in fact or navigable in law." "

"...If we allow anglers to have this legal right to fish, it may be harder to oppose any attempt by hunters to have a law granting them the right to hunt. We must oppose this bill."

On nuisance wildlife, they had this to say about the problem geese in Seattle - "I'm honking mad. I think it's a travesty to kill wildlife in this city. We have so few wild animals anymore, and the ones we have, we're killing them."

"Coalition Against Duck Shooting"

This Australian group has worked for years to stop duck hunting in Australia, and has progressively succeeded in nearly doing so. This is another good example of how the anti’s work – one step at a time, until their goal to stop all hunting is achieved.

On duck hunting - "Duck shooting is not a sport. It is a cowardly, violent, anti-social act…Duck shooting is a one-sided cowardly activity." Their road map of success:

* 1990 – Western Australia bans duck hunting.

* 1990 – Waterfowl Identification Test required for hunters.

* 1994 – South Australia bans lead shot.

* 1995 – New South Wales bans duck hunting.

* 1997 – Semi-auto and pump shotguns banned.

* 2001 – Victoria: Number of duck hunters is 3000, down from 95000 in 1986. Reason given – "the public today sees the shooting of native waterbirds as an outdated, anti-social activity that is no longer acceptable in our society."

* 2002 – All lead shot banned.

* 2003 – Official Victorian Labor Party Policy: "Ban all recreational duck shooting."

From "Honor and Non-Violence for Animals"

On Bow-Hunting - "...a vicious way to kill that animal…It is horrifying to think of any living creature dying in such a slow, painful way…Bow hunting is barbaric entertainment."

On wounded deer - "…documented wounding rates that bow hunters inflict upon deer are appalling...Some of these wounded animals made their ways to roads where they were hit by cars."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep there's definitely some kooks out there. Now all we need is a kook season. laugh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep there's definitely some kooks out there. Now all we need is a kook season. laugh

Would that be a sport hunting season, or would we have to eat what we shot? gringrin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted By: Big Tom
Yep there's definitely some kooks out there. Now all we need is a kook season. laugh

Would that be a sport hunting season, or would we have to eat what we shot? gringrin

I was thinking more along the lines of a bounty on paid on each one...Kind of a varmint deal. laugh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love all these jokes on PETA, but seriosly guys, if we aren't proactive on this stuff, outdoor recreation may come to an end. They have alot of money and people to get the word out. If you lived in the big city and didn't hunt or fish, never thought about life off your "block", who would you listen to about the idea of it, a group backed by millions of people and gazillions of dollars, or the few outdoorsmen thatspeak up?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every time I hear the word PETA I laugh....These people must be wearing all plastic shoes/sandals all day every day and don't bear the fruits of LEATHER....or always wear makeup that doesn't contain animal by-products....btw...does anyone have any information about how much money PETA raises for wildlife restoration...I'd like to see a comparison of the funds raised by PETA-type groups and those raised by hunters....anyone with information would be awesome!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to ensure any animals existance. Just start eating and hunting it and put a season on it. the true conservationists ie: the Hunters and Fisherman will see to it that there numbers only increase.

We don't just talk about stuff we actually do the ground work.

I dont see peta building wooduck houses or the mallard tunnels or the science to promote survival.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True, PETA is low on most of our lists, but they have huge amounts of money, support, and influence.

So who can we support that will counter PETA's activism?

This must be a topic both sides of the political party can agree on? I hope.... cool

No way I can say this without offending anyone, by all means its not meant to, Its the NRA that is on the opposite side of the teader todder. One extreme vs. the other extreme. In no way am I supporting the extreme actions of either side by mentioning this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is an example of what PETA thinks of fishing:

Hot Topics: PETA's Latest Anti-Fishing Ad Campaign

Our "Your Daddy Kills Animals" Campaign intends to help fathers understand the message that they are sending to their children by fishing. Many of us here at PETA are parents ourselves and agree that we should be concerned about what our kids are exposed to. Because our leaflet exposes the violence involved in fishing, we are not distributing this leaflet to children younger than 13. Instead, we are giving the leaflets directly to their fathers who fish. We believe that this can help fathers realize that they are setting a destructive and callous example for children, who are inherently compassionate and fond of animals and who, sooner or later, will begin to understand that their dads callously contribute to the suffering and deaths of bright and sensitive beings.

Many people have never stopped to think about it, but fish are smart, interesting animals with their own unique personalities—just like the dogs and cats who share our homes. For example, fish can learn to avoid nets by watching other fish in their group and can recognize individual "shoal mates." Some fish gather information by eavesdropping on others. A recent issue of Fish and Fisheries cited more than 500 research papers on fish intelligence proving that fish are smart, that they can use tools, and that they have impressive long-term memories and sophisticated social structures.

Children, following their parents' examples, often grow up fishing without considering the terror and suffering that fish endure when they're impaled by a hook and pulled out of the water. In fact, if anglers treated cats, dogs, cows, or pigs the way they treat fish, they could be thrown in prison on charges of cruelty to animals.

Fishing is far from a harmless pastime. That's why we're urging anglers to pitch their poles and enjoy other activities with their kids, such as hiking, camping, or canoeing, instead. We encourage you to take a moment to visit our Web site about this issue, FishingHurts.com.

Raising a compassionate child in today's violent world can be a challenging task. We hope you will join us in teaching children the vital message that harming animals for pleasure is not OK. Learn more about the link between animal abuse and violence toward humans.

We hope that this information is helpful to you. Thank you for your compassion.

Sincerely,

The PETA Staff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Imagine the horror the bacteria feel everytime I brush my teeth. I might not even be able to stomach walking down the sidewalk with all the feeling creatures scurring out of my way,cowering in the cracks, or worse wounded on the bottom of my shoes.

I better not leave the house. Hans

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted By: Swill
True, PETA is low on most of our lists, but they have huge amounts of money, support, and influence.

So who can we support that will counter PETA's activism?

This must be a topic both sides of the political party can agree on? I hope.... cool

No way I can say this without offending anyone, by all means its not meant to, Its the NRA that is on the opposite side of the teader todder. One extreme vs. the other extreme. In no way am I supporting the extreme actions of either side by mentioning this.

PETA says nothing about gun control, that is all the NRA is about.

Your logic does not follow. I agree that both groups are on the extreme outside of their issue, but that is an apples to oranges comparison, and is unfair to both groups.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0