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BobT

Can you believe it?

19 posts in this topic

This is from MSNBC HSOforum, posted yesterday.

Quote:
The first of the 2 million people who fled Gustav began to trickle home Tuesday from shelters, and many were grumbling about the food, the heat, the overcrowding, the uncertainty and the frustrating wait for the all-clear. Some evacuees, particularly in Texas, on the far fringes of the storm's path, suggested authorities overreacted in demanding they leave their homes...

"The reasons you're not seeing dramatic stories of rescue is because we had a successful evacuation," said Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff. "The only reason we don't have more tales of people in grave danger is because everyone heeded the instructions to get out of town." ...

I guess you just can't do the right thing.

Good thing I'm not serving as our president who is leaving office and hearing these complaints. I'd be inclined to make a public statement to the effect that the next time, they are on their own.

The next time I suppose they won't follow the evacuation orders and we'll be paying millions to rescue their sorry butts again. Good grief!

Bob

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I guess you just can't do the right thing.

Exactly. Either the government didn't do enough or the government overreacted. But it's just par for the course. It's human nature to complain about upheaval.

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Once again, not happy unless you hold their hands the whole way and give them everything they think they need. People who expect handouts from the gov't are never happy.

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If someone told me... you might die if you stay here... and if you do stay here we can not help you if you are in need...

I come back to see my house in good shape I would say.. at least I did not die.

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tealitup, that's how most of us felt after coming back to our homes in the Red River Flood of 1997. Some homes were destroyed, though not many, relatively speaking. Most took damage from minor to severe, but we tended to look around at our neighbors cleaning up, commiserate with them and complain together, and in the end say: "It's just stuff. We're alive and in good health, and no doubt we'll accumulate more stuff." So we bowed our necks and got busy living the rest of our lives.

We did get government "handouts." FEMA helped a bit (I think to the tune of several hundred dollars). We also qualified for a flood victims program in which we got money to put down on buying a house. That was a pretty big deal for us, and transformed us from renters into homebuyers.

We did not expect or assume we'd get these "handouts," nor would we have biotched if we hadn't gotten them. They were mighty welcome nonetheless, and we steadfastly thanked the American taxpayer for helping us out when we were down. We still thank you all for that.

There were people who puled and whined about not getting enough financial aid after that flood, just as happened in New Orleans, where the hurricane damage made GF/EGF look like a little spurt from a garden hose. The percentage of whiners was quite low, but of course they tend to get the most attention, not only from media but from those who see these aid programs as an evil symptom of big government and want to paint all such victims as moneygrabbing whiners.

I think people like us were in the vast majority in '97, and I think the same is true right now in New Orleans.

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That right there Steve, is the difference between Grand Forks and New Orleans. People weren't expecting a hand out and were grateful for what they did get.

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tealitup, that's how most of us felt after coming back to our homes in the Red River Flood of 1997. Some homes were destroyed, though not many, relatively speaking. Most took damage from minor to severe, but we tended to look around at our neighbors cleaning up, commiserate with them and complain together, and in the end say: "It's just stuff. We're alive and in good health, and no doubt we'll accumulate more stuff." So we bowed our necks and got busy living the rest of our lives.

We did get government "handouts." FEMA helped a bit (I think to the tune of several hundred dollars). We also qualified for a flood victims program in which we got money to put down on buying a house. That was a pretty big deal for us, and transformed us from renters into homebuyers.

We did not expect or assume we'd get these "handouts," nor would we have biotched if we hadn't gotten them. They were mighty welcome nonetheless, and we steadfastly thanked the American taxpayer for helping us out when we were down. We still thank you all for that.

There were people who puled and whined about not getting enough financial aid after that flood, just as happened in New Orleans, where the hurricane damage made GF/EGF look like a little spurt from a garden hose. The percentage of whiners was quite low, but of course they tend to get the most attention, not only from media but from those who see these aid programs as an evil symptom of big government and want to paint all such victims as moneygrabbing whiners.

I think people like us were in the vast majority in '97, and I think the same is true right now in New Orleans.

Steve I was there when that hit too, and you are correct, everyone had the mindset and thoughtfullness as to say, "at least we can rebuild" and "we are still here"....it was sad when you would talk to people and say, "yeah had 6 feet of water in the basement" and they would reply, "oh, you made it out ok then"

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That right there Steve, is the difference between Grand Forks and New Orleans. People weren't expecting a hand out and were grateful for what they did get.

I haven't been to New Orleans after Katrina, and am assuming you haven't either, so while I believe some things, I don't know them.

So all we have to go on are media reports, and the media tends to report on those with the loudest voices who are generating the most controversy, even if those people are a small minority.

There were those people in Grand Forks, and there are those people in New Orleans. I think a person who hadn't been involved in either disaster but relied completely on news reports would get a tremendously skewed view of reality because those relatively few loud voices get the most ink/airtime.

I doubt there's much difference in the percentages of whiners/graspers between GF and New Orleans. Human nature is pretty consistent.

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I actual went and worked in the Joint Operations Command after Katrina (it was in Batton Rouge) - took a trip and talked to people in New Orleans. I must say after a couple weeks it went from "glad we are alive" to "where is the gov't to help."

I went away thinking one thing.... if Katrina ever happened in the Midwest, Minnesota, citizens would be putting every boat in the water they could to save people and not rely on the gov't doing so. I could see a Fishing Minnesota group coming together with their duck boat, bass boat or canoe to save our neighbors.

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Human nature is pretty consistent.

I agree with that, and about the guesstimate of ratio's. I also am one who has never been in that position (thankfully) but also one who has no problem helping people out during those tough times. I think we (collectively) should, and am glad to see people use the monies wisely, like I think most in Red River Valley did.

What I can't understand, maybe this is wrong thread for it, is why the heck does the rebuilding always seem to go on in the same darned place?... Mainly talking flooding here, as it happens time and time again. Granted, I don't live in a flood plain so I don't understand the reasoning, but it just baffles me to KNOW that we will be at this point again in NO, heck we almost were 2 days ago - all it would take is a dike to blow... and the same thing all over again.

And that is when I will be answering NO to the question, "Can you believe it?"

Fool me once, shame on you Mother Nature... fool me twice, shame on me... heh wink

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I agree that for the most part people are consistant but how many complaints do we remember from those devastated last year when some areas in southeastern Minnesota were destroyed by massive floods? I remember the news report showing how a river (don't recall which one) has washed out so bad it not only flooded homes and businesses but it gouged out the land they sat on. The reporter interviewed a couple of those victims and both gave similar responses. The ag business owner pointed out that it is tough enough when a building is destroyed but they no longer even have land to build on because the river took it away. What I did not hear from him was how the government failed him and others.

I don't recall hearing any complaints from displaced persons after the floods in northwestern MN either. Most attitudes were similar to yours, stfcatfish.

How many complaints did we hear from our breadbasket when the Mississippi flooded so bad about 10 years ago? Did we hear about how our government failed them? I don't recall hearing about it. What I do recall is that the general consensus was that the river dikes needed to be improved in order to reduce the potential for a repeat but that's about all I recall.

I think there may be a little difference in the way people react sometimes and perhaps we are not all that consistant.

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A group of my friends went to help out after Katrina.

They brought tons of bottled water and food (mainly sandwiches) with them.

No one helped the volunteers unload supplies. Young men were everywhere, and did not help. They griped that they staff was "slow".

Then, they started handing out water, and all they heard were complaints. "What, no coke?" "Oh, I want mine colder."

Then, more complaints with the food. "A cold meal, what is this?" "But, I want McDonalds!"

They said they will never take their time to help these people again....

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It's human nature to complain about upheaval.

I guess it's also human nature to just want to complain. Someone sits at home and starts a thread complaining about people complaining! smile

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A group of my friends went to help out after Katrina.

They brought tons of bottled water and food (mainly sandwiches) with them.

No one helped the volunteers unload supplies. Young men were everywhere, and did not help. They griped that they staff was "slow".

Then, they started handing out water, and all they heard were complaints. "What, no coke?" "Oh, I want mine colder."

Then, more complaints with the food. "A cold meal, what is this?" "But, I want McDonalds!"

They said they will never take their time to help these people again....

Welcome to the land of ENTITLEMENT.

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Originally Posted By: BobT

It's human nature to complain about upheaval.

I guess it's also human nature to just want to complain. Someone sits at home and starts a thread complaining about people complaining! smile

Exactly! gringringrin

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Originally Posted By: Canon Guy
Originally Posted By: BobT

It's human nature to complain about upheaval.

I guess it's also human nature to just want to complain. Someone sits at home and starts a thread complaining about people complaining! smile

Exactly! gringringrin

For the record, I am being misquoted here. The statement about human nature was not mine but from stfcatfish. At any rate, you got me there. smirk

Bob

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Originally Posted By: stfcatfish
Human nature is pretty consistent.

I agree with that, and about the guesstimate of ratio's. I also am one who has never been in that position (thankfully) but also one who has no problem helping people out during those tough times. I think we (collectively) should, and am glad to see people use the monies wisely, like I think most in Red River Valley did.

What I can't understand, maybe this is wrong thread for it, is why the heck does the rebuilding always seem to go on in the same darned place?... Mainly talking flooding here, as it happens time and time again. Granted, I don't live in a flood plain so I don't understand the reasoning, but it just baffles me to KNOW that we will be at this point again in NO, heck we almost were 2 days ago - all it would take is a dike to blow... and the same thing all over again.

And that is when I will be answering NO to the question, "Can you believe it?"

Fool me once, shame on you Mother Nature... fool me twice, shame on me... heh wink

Have to agree with that! What are these people thinking? What do they think is going to happen when you build you home below sea level on the beach? What would everyone think if I were to build a house on the ice of lake vermilion and in the spring when it thawed I acted like everyone should pay for me to build a new house and when I got taxpayers money for the loss of my home I took it and rebuilt on the ice again?

Its only a matter of time. I think the government should have bailed them out the first time and then told them if you go back again your on your own. Do we really need that dna in the gene pool?

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That's what I said in the last Gustav thread and got raked over the coals for it. Build in areas lower than sea level?? Geez, what could happen?? I was kinda hoping the dike would break and they'd just say, enough is enough. Move further inland, we're done with this.

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