Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Shoot2Kill

Early geese and lily pads.

11 posts in this topic

I just took my boat out to the pond where we're going to hunt this coming weekend and the 40 acre pond is probably 75% covered in lily pads! The pads are very thick and probably go out 75 yards from the cattails where we usually have the boat - way too far to shoot to the open water. This pond always holds geese during duck season and the pads have never been that far out from shore so we've never had a problem bringing in the geese. Will all these pads keep them from landing in there? I can't even row the boat they are so thick! I need a push pole!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If its isolated water I would think it would still be good, but if they are just loafing and doing some occasional dabbling that won't attract much for ducks or geese.

My $0.02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the drier weather the water is probably lower than normal that's probably why the pads are so bad. If it's that thick that you can't even row through it then the geese usually stay out of it. If they land in there they are going to be right out in the middle. That's my guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is just my .02 but a few years back on a duck opener we had the same situation and the geese would come over and take a good look but that would be it and land in the middle of the lake. We did shoot geese but basically was pass shooting cuz they didn't want in. They actually came over the deks nice but one pass and a look was all they would do. Try it out though, you never know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cut them! Probably DNR regulation against this so be careful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:
Any control of emergent vegetation, such as cattails, and the use of pesticides in public waters does require a DNR aquatic plant management permit. Aquatic plants such as cattail, bulrush, water lilies, and other aquatic vegetation are important because they reduce wave action (thereby reducing the threat of shoreline erosion), provide fish and wildlife habitat, buffer shorelines from pollutants, and provide other environmental benefits. DNR aquatic plant management permits are issued through the DNR Regional Fisheries Offices. The rules governing the destruction of aquatic vegetation are found in Minnesota Rules - Chapter 6280.

See Aquatic Vegetation Permitting . Not worth removing and you wouldn't get a permit since you aren't a homeowner and it sure as heck wouldn't be deemed necessary. That's marginal goose hunting water at best. Look elsewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am with da chise....find another spot

If not then cut em

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am with da chise....find another spot

If not then cut em

It would take a few solid days of cutting them to clear a spot...it's insane how thick they are.

We also found out this weekend that this pond/lake is now full of the asian milf oil(?) [PoorWordUsage] too.....not good water for geese at all but the dang thing was covered in ducks all morning when we were out there....duck season should be fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was out this last weekend, and I too had about 75% pads. There were tons of ducks in there, and the geese did come close, but it could have been better.

Will these lily pads die off in a few weeks?

On a positive note, there was open spaces out there, ang constant duck activity all day long

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0