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NCLaker

Bass BC Combo Sanity Check -Thanks for all the help for the BC newbie!

4 posts in this topic

I think I have most the Bass fishing baitcaster combo's I think I will need to get me going for a while. I know why I mixed and matched these combo's - but am looking for your feedback on what presentation/type of fishing you would target each combo for (including line recommendations), and do I have a big hole that I did not account for??

1. 7' Med, Fast Action (6.4:1 reel)

2. 6'6" MH, Fast Action (6.3:1 reel)

3. 7' MH, Compre Crankbait/Moderate Action rod (6.3:1 reel)

4. 7 MH, Fast Action (7.1:1) reel)

I have a good variety of spinning combo's that may plug some holes on Med-ML power rods.

Thanks!

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1. 7' Med, Fast Action (6.4:1 reel)

Texas rigged worms, senkos, and maybe spinner baits. I would run 14#-17# test flouro.

2. 6'6" MH, Fast Action (6.3:1 reel)

Similar to above. Might be better spinner bait rod and would work for buzzbaits and texas rigged as well. Good dock rod. same line

3. 7' MH, Compre Crankbait/Moderate Action rod (6.3:1 reel)\

Good crank bait and topwater (other than frog and buzzbait) rod. Little fast on the reel. I would run 10-12# test flouro, if you want to do topwater with it no flouro.

4. 7 MH, Fast Action (7.1:1) reel)

Jigs, Slop, Heavy Weeds. 50#-65# braid.

That 4 covers what you need. I love flippin sticks but they take some getting use to. If you were to get another combo I would get a flippin rod (7'6") and a slower reel. Use the slower reel with your crankin rod and that reel on this rod.

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Thanks for the feedback Cecil. I am using the rods pretty close to what you've suggested. Didn't think to do Texas riggin on the 7 med - I like the idea of using a lighter rod. I've got mono on the 6'6" so was planning on using it for my topwater/buzzbaits (except frogs). Went with flouro on 7' MH rods.

Flippin will have to wait till next year ... still trying to figure out the technique.

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I want to thank all the FMer's that have helped me figure out my shift to Baitcasters. I've asked a bunch of question on what Reels, rods, and what line to use (I'm sure I've annoyed a few of you with all the questions). I think I am finally set, have been working with them for about a month now, and a lot more confidence and love using them. My spinning setups will be collecting a lot more dust.

With the increased cost and complexity of using BC, your advice has helped a lot. I probably would have given up on using them had I not had the help.

For those starting out for the first time, In my opinion based on a beginners point of view, I recommend starting with:

- Rod: 6'6" Med, fast action graphite rod

- Reel: quality reel no less than $100 range. If it has the centrifuge breaks - set only two breaks off (opposite each other), and set your spool tension know so the lure drops slowly. Magnetic breaks - turn on at least 3/4 on or more.

- Lure: start practicing with minimum of a 3/8+ ounce bass jig. You want enough weight to easily draw your line out at a steady rate, and can retrieve back quickly when practicing your casts. Initially stay away from light lures especially once that get hung up in the wind - doing so will likely cause you a lot of frustration with backlashes.

- Line: IMO This is one of the key success factors to learning a to use a BC, that is often overlooked. 10-12# mono/copoly that is really limp (Gama is excellent). Spray your spool with "Reel Magic" before use, it can help a lot. Stay away from flouro until you get better at casting. Stiff lines like flouro or some of the stiffer mono/copoly will make casting without backlashes much more difficult. Braided/superlines is too expensive if you get backlashes so bad you need to cut it out.

I can go on and on about lessons learned on how to start using a BC, and I still have a long way to go and more techniques to learn. # one rule is that for most of you, starting out can be a painful learning experience (backlashes), but it pays of to keep working at it, and you will find the challenge fun. Unless you live on the water, definitely practice in the yard or docks (on non-windy days) before messing with it on the boat.

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