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Jesse Drummer

I need help!!!!

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All this year i have been not focusing on walleyes for various reasons. The question I have is what is a good goto rig or lure to use first when targeting walleyes when the fall bite starts? i have cought 1 walleye last year with a small jig and a minnow hooked through the head. should i slowly drag a jig and minnow or leech on a plain hook with a split shot? go verticle with raps?

any help please will be appreciated!!

if you don't wanna post on here please contact me via e-mail

at adrenilinseeker20@yahoo.com

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I prefer to vertical jig. Northland jigs are very good, made to take a stinger hook. 3/8 ounce works well in 20 to 30 fow. You can also troll three way rigs with spinners to cover more water. Fathead work well in fall. Turk

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JDrummer - need a little more info to really give you a good answer. What kind of water are you going to be fishing, how early or late in the fall, are you fishing during daylight or after dark, etc.

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I like the three ways, but I like the lindy rigs as my go to. Have had pretty good luck with them. Just a plain red hook on a snell or a few beads with a spinner. Crawlers, leeches or minnows, all are good, you just have to experiment and found out what's working that day.

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I use jigs with chubs most of the time but if I go chase some big ones then it will be lindy rig with redtails or large shiners. Perchjerker is right on about needing more info on the type of lake and what month cause things will change once the lakes turnover.

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I'm getting much better at jigging for walleyes. Not much at all with Lindy's (probably my fault).

I'm trying spinner rigs more this year during the day. Had what felt to be a good sized walleye on my line for 20 or 30 seconds and then the flouro shredded. I've had lots of hits, so I'm halfway there. Can't seem to hook them though. Using gulp alive 3" minnows in 20-25 feet. Any tips on that? My mainline is 10/4 fireline. Hookset right away or wait a second or two with the gulp?

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For me im fishing the mighty missipp.and i like to troll cranks seems firetiger allways works with perch close behind.I also use jig and twister combo with 4-5 inch twisters the fish go crazy for this.1/4-1/2 oz depending on the current wich seems to slow some years some years it takes alot more.Jig and minnow allways seems to work this time of the year depending on if your lake fishing or river wieght of jig will very.As far as color of jig i use just a plain head and add color with plastic.

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This last week drift and crawler worked for me, they went crazy for it. Clear water with 74 degree surface temps. Some with spinner some with just a plain hook. I was working points and sunken islands. Early morning late afternoon.

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Well the technique question is as wide open as it gets and you'll get many different answers. A lot depends on where and when you fish in the fall. Early fall is a transition as is late fall. Both will be good times to catch walleyes but how you do it may very well be quite different.

For me I'll be working a couple of different techniques to put walleyes in the boat in the fall.

#1 Trolling cranks at night or during low light periods. I prefer long minnow baits in the fall. Usually 4-5" baits early in the fall increasing to 5-8" baits later in the fall. Colors vary greatly based on moon phase, water clarity and forage base.

#2 Livebait rigging with a lively leech crawler, shiner, redtail or creek chub. Water temps will crive the bait selection to some degree. If it's colder than 55 degrees it'll be minnows most of the time.

#3 Jig and minnow or plastic. Simple as it gets. 1/8 - 5/8 oz jig with a minnow lip or tail hooked.

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ok thanks for all the replys ! to be more specific . the lakes would be in the mankato area. madison,washington,tetonka, they are darker water clarity lakes and tetonka has a river system through it . my question is mostly for the conditions now or in the near future (falling water temp but not cold yet.)

i have a bass boat with a cold cold blooded johnson out board so i don't know how late in the year i'll be fishing.

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ohh ya i mostly fish from 9:30a.m. to 4:30 p.m. but if im lucky enough to have the girl friend let me go early i can be on the lake early before sun up or sun down,what ever is better?

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I don't really fish those lakes or even know them very well, but my guess is the fish are more weedline fish and less mid-lake structure fish. Look for steep breaks, especially steep breaks that come up to weeds. Jig/minnow on the weedline, crankbaits on the weedline, jigs/big minnows down the steeper breaks when we actually get to fall and cooler water (and bigger baitfish and young-of-the-year fish. Shallow is good in the fall, but it's not fall yet, and since you're fishing the middle of the day, I'd stay on deep weedlines or deeper.

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I think Borch is talking about crankbait colors for after dark. The general rule of thumb that I follow is dark night = dark baits, bright night = bright baits, broken light = the in-between colors, and if you have 2 or 3 lines in the water then one of them should probably start with firetiger.

I've never thought that color matters much for jigging. I like bright colors, especially in stained water. Glows, chartruese, white, etc. If that doesn't work then try black or pink. If nothing is working then mix it up if it makes you feel better.

I neglected to mention this in my previous post, but if you're jigging in the fall you can use plastics, especially as the water cools (it has 20+ degrees to go still). Color choices get more complex when you're talking plastics vs. just a jighead, but I'd look at them as bright colors or dark/natural colors.... I wouldn't make it any more complex than that to start. If you find that brights or naturals are working for you, then maybe expand your colors in that area. But I really don't think you need to sweat the color choice that much for jigging, even with plastics.

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i've recently started a fishing log in a note book because i fish so much that i'm starting to forget some things and i am putting together patterns like mad . so thanks for all the info. I wanna get a new avitar before the ice is up!

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is there a "giude line" for jig weights?

Use the lightest jig you can and still be comfortable with feeling the bottom well. If your not feeling bottom well go bigger. If your drifting you dont want a ton of line out to hit bottom. When anchored you will of course need less weight and in current need more.

At times a drag n hop will work and at others you will need to lift drop.

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In our area small firetiger rattle raps work well on most of the lakes for pitching shallow. Last year I had luck on one of the lakes you mentioned doing this in mid September. Later on I like to jig's and fatheads on drop-off's gold and white are good jig color's.

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