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TKO_PUNCH

Furnace Humidifiers?

9 posts in this topic

With the upcoming winter season approaching, I have been thinking about installing a humidifier attached to the furnace. I know last year we had a couple table top units that were not able to keep up. The house was still dry.

I'm wondering if this is a good idea or should I purchase a larger stand-alone humidifier? My biggest concern is mold. I have always been told that you want a cool mist in the winter and with installing one attached to the furnace would this now be a warm mist?

Thanks for the replies in advance!

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Get a furnace mount. They all work pretty well. Get one that YOU can get the

panels. That way you don't have to keep going back to a service teck to get them.

Change the panel once a year, in the fall. VERY IMPORTANT

DO NOT buy a Humidifier that has a wheel in it. (JUNK)

Warm air will absorb lots of humidity. Cold air will not.

Who ever told about a cool mist vs. warm mist doesn't know what they are talking

about. You want to evaporate the moisture in to the air. Not squirt water/mist in

the air-stream (very bad)

Last. If your furnace only runs a couple of times an hour (tight house) in the winter,

You may wont to keep your stand alone units as well.

A furnace Hun. only works when the furnace is running.

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A whole house humidifier is a good thing but they also will plug up alot and can be somewhat of a hassle especially if you have hard water. Also it is a GOOD idea to tap into the hot water. IMO a great unit is a Aprilaire you can find them on hsolist. Better tthan that would be a residental steam humid. about three time the price but the maintenece is none and they dont leak plus it is a much cleaner install.

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I don't see the advantage of tapping into the hot water line. The flow rate used is so small that the water won't be hot by the time it gets to the furnace anyway. Also, using the hot water line encourages bacterial growth in the humidifier that you may not want.

Mine works great. It has filter cartridges that can be replaced once a year and includes a humidstat to regulate the humidity in the house, which is very important.

One advantage to using a humidifies is that it can save you a lot on your heating bill. You'll find the house will be more comfortable at lower temperatures.

Bob

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My Aprilaire was tapped into the hot water line when I bought my house. I've never had any issues as long as I put in a new cartridge every fall.

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I just had a quote done and they want $750.00 installed for a unit with it's own blower. They said I would need a blower for the size of the house.

Any comments on the price? Good/Bad?

I'm willing to learn/install things myself, but with plumbing I'm not comfortable.

Thanks for the info~

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If you have a forced air furnace I don't see why you'd have to have a separate blower. I would think you could find one that could be installed on your existing ductwork. I installed my own on my cold air return plenum in my basement. Only tools required was a tin shears and drill to punch a hole. The plumbing was a 1/4" plastic tube with a copper piercing adaptor that clamped onto my water line and punched its own hole. The electrical was just to hook up 120v to the unit to power a solenoid valve controlled by the humidstat. Mine is a Skuttle flow-through model 2001 if you're interested in seeing what I'm talking about.

Bob

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I would not use one of the vampire clips (piercing saddle) a mess waiting to happen and not legal. I am sure alot of people have had no problems with the ones they use but i have seen plenty that have caused problems. Instead cut in a tee and use an angle stop (just like you have under your lav) then any time you need to shut the water off its no problem and it will meet code.

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Not legal? I'm not aware of this.

Bob

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