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dan z

when to robo?

7 posts in this topic

I know you cant use the battery operated one for the first ten days but does ne one have ne days they absolutly take it with or does everyone just use it till the first flock to see if they like/dislike it.

How many is to many ? I have up to 4 with great results.

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In feilds the one with the most Rodo's wins.....On the water we use 1 or two depending on the decoy spread. Once it becomes legal to use them, I never leave mine home.

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I avoid using them as much as possible.

In the fields for ducks they are practically a necessity but if we are mostly hunting geese we will leave them down next to our layouts and will just put 'em up / turn 'em on if we have ducks in the area. Leaving them up will ruin the geese. And pressured birds will wise up real fast in the fields to rotos that just keep on spinning nowadays...switching it on / off (if you have it hardwired) seemed to be a lot more effective last year.

Over water, I guess it just depends on the day. Sometimes they can be money and others I think they do more harm than good. Right at the start of shooting time I like to have it on, and then again later on if we're seeing good numbers of mallards, specifically singles and pairs. If we're set up for both ducks and geese I don't like putting it out because it eliminates the ability for us to finish geese.

Just my two cents!

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Where we hunt in WI, there is quite bit of competition, and it becomes a kind of game. We'll start with the max we brought(usually from 3-5) and see how it's going. If the ducks are avoiding us we will knock off a robo or two and see if that changes anything. Often times 2 or 3 will be our most productive numbers. But sometimes the more the merrier.

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I use 2 of them and plan on adding another, mostly on late season greenies. I really prefer to use them when hunting migrators! In fields they definately are the ticket!! I sometimes feel that the pressured local ducks key in on them sometimes giveing poor results!

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When we hunt we use three of them, one on each end of the spread and one in the middle. I started with 1 and it worked so well a couple of years ago, I went to three and will never look back.

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I prefer never, but it is a personal preference.

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