Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
PDOGG

Removing water scum from boat and motor?

23 posts in this topic

Does anybody have a decent method for getting the white water scum off the water line on a boat and motor? I have tried 2 differant soaps and windex now to no avail. Any help is appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is really bad you can use CLR but make sure to rinse it off cause it can take off your paint. The way I like to clean my motor is to wash it with vinegar and then give it a soapy wash and rinse. I actually will wash my entire boat that way and you can't believe how much better it looks. By the way I have a aluminum boat and I don't know what it would do to the jelcoat on a glass boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a glass boat with the gel coat. I will try the vinegar idea I already use that on the carpet it's good on getting the fish smell out! Will CLR and Works eat at the finish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second Marine-Man suggestion. The Works (in the bottle not spray) is the best. It will not harm your finish but be sure to rinse it off well when done. Also don't do it on a concrete slab, it will stain it (actually it will clean it, but will look like a stain...of clean)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had great luck this year with the Easy on, Easy off Instant Hull Cleaner. I seen it Fleet Farm in a white and blue bottle.

I have had it like 3 or 4 years, but never used. Have been using degreaser and pressure washer. I used it on my boat this last month and it took off all of the river stains and such. It has that sulfur smell to it and I would use gloves.

I also put it into a spray bottle and diluted it just a little. This works awesome on aluminum stuff and the boat motor. Spray it on and let it sit, pressure wash off. I also spray it on my alum. rims on my truck a couple times while cleaning boat and they look the best they have for many years now.

For the boat I pour it on a big sponge, wipe on and pressure wash off.

I wish I had used last year. Instead I was brushing degreaser on and not really getting any where.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try Wonderfoam or Restore.

[Note from admin, edited. Please read forum policy before posting again. Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike, I have a friend with a detail shop, I will give him a call tonight and see what he uses, he does a few boats from time to time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"a stain...of clean"

Can't have that.

I know it's an oxymoron but spill some The Works on any concrete and you'll see what I mean laugh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank's for all the help guys! I think I'll give vinegar a try since I should have some of that at home then I'll go from there. I'll let you guys know how it works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Best thing I have EVER used is a product called Captain Munch???Comes in a spray bottle. It took off the scum and lime deposits off the boat after nothing else worked. It is a great product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were did you pick this up? I took a quick run through the marine dept. at fleet farm a few days back and didn't find anything. Maybe i need to ask or look in a differant area?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a line up of lime removers you wouldn;t beleive. tryed every one of them to get the lime deposits off a used boat I bought, none worked. I am thinking of sanding the lime deposits off and repainting. It sounds too me like a lot of work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got the Captain Munch at Bay Lake Marine in their service department. I can not be certain of the name although I know it is close. I had my boat at Koronis for a week and it was thick with lime deposits after only a week. I washed the boat at lest five times with various products with no result, this worked great. When I talked to the boat service dept they cautioned against using CLR thinking it would be caustic to the finish. Do a google search, you should find it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Toilet bowl cleaner works wonders on fiberglass. Ace hardware brand is the cheapest we can get around here and it does an amazing job. The trick is to let it do the work, just wipe it on the boat and leave it sit 10 minutes or until you see that the stain is gone, hose it off and you are done. People in the marina have seen us using this on the boats and were amazed at the results, better than all the commercial products and lots cheaper. If you can't find Ace Hardware brand, Sno-Bowl works just as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Star-Bright is the name brand of the stuff I use.

It does have some acid in it though, but wax boat a couple times a year and it should be fine.

When I removed the scum from my boat, it was very, very thick. River spring time scum/foam/sludge!~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, its restore and wonderfoam that you want.

[note from admin: please read forum policy before posting again. thanks]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hands down wonderfoam to remove the the water line and deposits and restore to keep it looking good. I've been using it for a number of years, it works and it does zero harm to your finish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tried the toilet bowl cleaner on my white Johnson motor, its amazing, it looks like its new!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Dad works at a marina on Lake of the Woods and they use a product called "Slimey Grimey" that works exceptionaly well for them, they use is on all the boats there in the fall when they take them out of the water for the season.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • i've never done the plastic thing. but i've takin Reb's advice on planting grass, in particular filling in spots and its turned out great. so this is going to really hurt to say this, but Reb knows what he's talking about when it comes to his lawn. i've also seen pictures.
    •   Right next to the river, no less.  Isn't anyone from the EPA concerned about this?    
    • The "if you were watching the story" was referring to the actions of VW.   Your link about mercedes was full of weasel words and little actual hard information.     And from the link you posted...   Seems like no evidence they did anything wrong has surfaced yet.   Maybe, maybe not.   So, what facts are you referring to?   And are you disputing the stuff about BMW and VW as well?     Oh, and from wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_emissions_scandal    
    • Repairs and fixes for 2.0-liter Volkswagen and Audi TDI models:   There are three generations of the 2.0-liter turbo-diesel four-cylinder, and all will require different fixes (from simple software updates to complete, and potentially performance-crippling, hardware retrofits). As of January 6, 2017, Volkswagen announced a complete fix for 2015 TDI models with the third-generation engine. This will involve installing a second NOx sensor and a new or replacement diesel-oxidation catalyst. In March 2017, VW received approval to sell these cars, of which there are approximately 12,000 new and 67,000 used. On May 19, 2017, VW received approval to repair 2012–2014 Passat TDI models. A total of 84,391 cars are included, except those with manual transmissions; CARB said VW had not shown sufficient evidence that they will be made compliant. VW is awaiting approval to resell these vehicles as used cars. Buybacks and compensation for 3.0-liter Volkswagen and Audi TDI and Porsche diesel models:

      As of December 21, 2016, Volkswagen reached a second settlement with the roughly 78,000 owners and lessees of 3.0-liter diesel models. In late January 2017, Volkswagen announced a $1.2 billion program that differs substantially from the $10 billion program for 2.0-liter diesel models. Judge Breyer approved the final settlement amount on May 11, 2017. Currently, only owners of 2009–2012 Audi Q7 and Volkswagen Touareg models with the Generation 1 engine are eligible for buybacks between $24,755 to $57,157. This is because Volkswagen cannot repair them to be emissions compliant. Generation 1 lessees of 2012 vehicles can receive between $5001 and $6615 for terminating their leases early. Generation 1 owners who do not sell their cars back to Volkswagen can receive $7755 to $13,880. For complete details, see the court’s handy executive summary. For Generation 2 models between 2013–2016, Volkswagen will offer cash compensation ranging from $7039 to $16,114; if the recall isn’t made “timely available,” the automaker will buy them back for prices between $43,153 to $99,862 and extend any warranties that might expire until the recall is ready. Generation 2 lessees can receive between $5677 and $12,492 for terminating their leases early. If lessees decide to keep their cars and perform the fix, they each receive a flat $2000. In all cases with Generation 2 cars, owners and lessees can opt to receive half of the cash payments up front and the other half once the vehicle is repaired. Generation 2 owners and lessees are also eligible to receive up to $1500 each as part of a separate $327.5 million settlement with Bosch, the supplier of the emissions software. Details are available here. These prices have been set using NADA Used Car Guide Clean Retail values as of November 2015 and adjusted for options, mileage, and the region the vehicle was registered in as of that month. The 2016 diesel models will be repurchased at 12.9 percent above prices for equivalent 2015 models. Owners and lessees will also be reimbursed for state and local taxes. The registration deadline is December 31, 2019. Owners and lessees will get the same payment (adjusted for mileage) regardless of when they register. Repairs and fixes for 3.0-liter Volkswagen and Audi TDI and Porsche diesel models:   There are two versions of the 3.0-liter turbo-diesel V-6 that require different modifications. The Generation 1 engines in the 2009–2012 Audi Q7 and Volkswagen Touareg cannot be made fully compliant with EPA regulations. Generation 2 engines in 2013–2016 models can be fixed under a formal recall that must be approved by the EPA and CARB no later than December 20, 2017, or else Volkswagen must pay owners an additional penalty. On those 58,000 models, Audi said on November 23, 2015, that it would update the software and “resubmit” its emissions applications after the EPA found undocumented “auxiliary emission control devices” that were allowing excessive levels of NOx.
    • I would guess it is going to create more pollution rounding up, transporting, scrapping and reclaiming those cars than the excess they would have emitted in their lifespan vs the cars that replace them. 
    • So, first you tell me " if you were watching the story closely" then when I posted a link supporting what I said to be fact, your response was that your memory is bad and you were making a hypothesis. Classic. 
    • they will all probably end up scrapped then. you can probably expect the junkyards to soon be filled with Volkswagens that will be missing the ECU, DPF, and have holes in their engines.   cash for clunkers 2.0?
    •     This is very earth friendly, and good tree huggers and bureaucrats everywhere love it...
    • I would like to get some recipes to inject a turkey breast, and appx. how long does it take to smoke it? And whats a good wood to use ?
    • Could be that others cheated also.   I was relying on memory about the BMW connection and hypothesized that Mercedes would also have been a possibility.   I did say "maybe mercedes".     In any case, VW cheated on emissions for many years with the assent of the highest levels of management.     Apparently making a small diesel that runs ok and doesn't make too much pollution at an acceptable cost is really hard.
  • Our Sponsors