Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Christopher Quast

What are some opinions about scents,calls, and decoys use in MN

17 posts in this topic

Just curious about what kind of opinioins and stories are out there on this subject please include things such as type of call used , lay of the land scenario, brand of call, scent, and dec you use and were you hunting on public or private land and please give the dates and time of day. Thanks for your cooperation

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my opinion calls and lures are over rated. No question the deer are guided by their sense of smell or make calls to attract or run off other deer. The problem is everyone uses them, if you are walking though the wood on public land and hear a grunt there is a good chance it is another hunter. Or if your were walking into your stand one afternoon and smelled a skunk and then a arrow flies by your face, next time you are walking in to your stand and smell a skunk you might change stands. A little over the top, but true. I have had bucks walk in up wind of me and down wind of scent and smell the deer pee then and walk out the same way they came in. I also think it haves to do with hunting pressure and deer population. In Texas deer numbers are high and the bucks fight more, so rattling works very well. Well there goes my 2 cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I disagree that they are overrated. I think too many people go in overconfident and then end up disappointed. I use calling more than scent but know both can be very effective.

My opinion is that each deer have individual attitudes and personalities. At any given time your in the woods, those deer are acting different than the last or the next time. By using calls and scents you trying to create something, create an opportunity or reaction. And it can work depending what attitude that deer is in at that time. I may grunt or rattle 50 times out in a season, does it work every time...??? NO WAY! but im out an entire season looking for ONE chance, ONE opportunity! If rattling gets a big buck out of his bed early and to me 1 out of 50 times, then Id say it was effective! If grunting pulls a buck from 100 yards to 20 yards like that deer is on a string, id say its effective!

Will useing scents and calls get you a shot everytime? Forget it!........ Do they work? I wouldnt be caught in the woods without them, you may miss the only chance your gonna get that season!

To answer the original question in full.... youll probably have to buy a book! smile Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree they will work and they have worked for me, but in my experience the bigger buck seem alarmed. When they work 1 out of 50 times are we pushing deer away we might see 10 out of 50 times. I guess it depends on time, place, and some luck. It is fun watching a deer come from across a field to calls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend gave me syringes and some bottles to get deer urine and said it works. I tried it last season seemed to work being. Fresh urine makes sense to me. I will only keep the urine for a week or two, because my butcher gets deer that are not field dressed and lets me cut them open and get it. I had a small 10 point walk in my step last early bow because it was on my boots, but he walk all the way up to my tree then look stright up at me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think scents and calls work, but their effectiveness is greater certain times of the year and definitely different from deer to deer. In the early phases of the rut I've had younger bucks (fawns and 1 1/2 yr olds) come strait to my stand a on a scent drag that I layed out. I've shot several bucks with their nose right on a scent wick I put out to stop them.

I've rattled and grunted in mature bucks during the pre-rut and rut. Typically I don't rattle and grunt blindly. If I see a buck and he isn't coming in my direction on his own, I call. I've also had bucks head for the next county the minute I started calling so I use it as a last resort if I don't have anything to lose.

I don't even know the brand of grunt I use. I've had it for years. I will say that a buck grunt has a more plastic sounding tone than I thought possible. I remember the first time I heard a buck grunt. I thought it was some guy doing a 'poor' imitation of a buck grunt coming through the woods. Imagine my surprise when a swulled neck eight pointer walks out a few seconds later. If you rub a plastic comb down the ribbed tube of a regular grunt call it proably makes a more accurate sound than blowing it does.

I've had good luck calling does using fawn bleats. I've also called in does using can calls, but never had luck on bucks with it, but some buddies have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got my first deer, a doe, late last October. She wandered 23 yds. in front of me about one minute after a can bleat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that they all work but as others have suggested they work better at certain times of the year.

I prefer to use scents as more of a cover up than as something that attracts deer.

I also prefer when a deer comes in casaully as opposed to on the alert (i.e. looking for a noise or scent). I think it is much easier to get a shot at them when they are more relaxed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do take part in the firearms season, but I'm replying here as an archer(where you need to get the deer in close)During most of the fall I'd much rather "be the woods" than send out alarms. I try to eliminate scent instead of introducing more. Your in the deer's home, and they know what's going on. Young deer can be fooled, but an older buck or doe haven't usually lived that long by falling for tricks. The only time I'll try to fool a mature buck is during the rut when he's thinking with his....Otherwise I just try to blend in on an ambush point on his way to/from the dinner table.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, instead of spending too much money on scents these past few years I have spent them on scent killer products. I make sure I have the scent reducing soap, shampoo, deodorant and laundry soap every season and make my own homemade scent killer spray. I do buy one bottle or buck bomb or whatever for use during the week of gun season but that's more about fooling around and experimenting when the deer are on high alert and thinking with something other than their brains as a previous poster just mentioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last year was my first year of archery hunting, and boy was that first year a learning experience. You go out there thinking it'll be different becuase i'm launching an arrow instead of a slug and thats about it. But in reality, there are so many ways in which it is different, and i personally think the effectiveness of scents/calls/decoys is one of these ways. I had hunted my whole life with the gun and experienced very little success using scents and calls. I shot one buck that was absolutely glued to the path i left with my drag rag but never had much success otherwise. This past year i had a LOT of luck using calls early in the season. Then on the day before the firearm season I rattled in a buck as he came bolting in and stopped darn near right under me. Then during the second week of firearm season, I used a silouette decoy and covered it's tail in some estrus doe scent and not a half hour later a curious buck came in nose in the air during the hottest part of the day. I am 100% convinced it was that scent he was coming to because he would have no other reason to be moving and active that time of day. I think you can experiment more early in the year and lure in some curious deer, but as time goes on you have to be more careful as you are trying to fool deer that have transformed from curious to cautious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PFUNK,

im with you this past year was my first year bowhunting i got many opportunities on PUBLIC LAND. i believe that part of it is because there are less people bowhunting therefore the whole woods isnt smelling like your scent isle at your local sports store he he. plus we get alot more time to experiment. I think as bow hunters we get to go through all PHASES of the deer pre rut, rut, post rut so we have more opportunities to try and have more things work. i saw quite a few deer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you can experiment more early in the year and lure in some curious deer, but as time goes on you have to be more careful as you are trying to fool deer that have transformed from curious to cautious.

PFUNK Amen brother!!! This sentence says it all just curious where were you hunting (general area) obviously is all I want to know so I can compare your success of rattling to the area you hunt thats all cuz I'm actually from your neck of the woods and would like to give this a go by my spots and see I feel alot of this concerns the buck to doe ratio in a given area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hunt mostly the hutchinson area, which is where i had the success i talked about. When i got the response to the rattle i was hunting a bedding area and rattled just before sunset and he came busting in. It was the first time i rattled a buck that i knew 100% he was coming looking for a fight. As far as the buck/doe ratio goes, i know of the groups that hunt the same general area as me, we came to conclude that at least 25 bucks had been taken that year so the high number of bucks could very well have contibuted to the success with rattling as there was a lot of competition for does. That's a very good point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What time of year did you rattle that buck in at and did you use real antlers or a bag and did you have a decoy out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was the day before the firearm season opened, so early November. You wouldn't catch me dad with one of those rattling antler bags. I think they sound muffled and don't have the solid crack of rattling antlers. The antlers I use came off a nice roadkill. I didn't have a decoy out but did mix a few grunts in with my buck growler. He'd have been a hurting unit at 10 yards but was a bit small. Didn't fail to give me one heck of a rush though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Preds make it to the finals.  I thought someone said they were the last team in and technically the 16 seed.   Who ever they face in the finals it will be a battle, hope the Sens make it.  But would be nice to see Cullen get a cup.
    • My hunt in WI this past weekend was tough as well.  I found tons of ramps, they grow everywhere in the area we hunted, but zero morels.  I saw a few pheasant backs, but did not pick them as they did not interest me.  
    • I finally just said screw it, so I picked a couple of guys that I thought would do good (Christie, and Rojas) and some over looked guys that have had a little success this year, and were from the area.  Would never had expected Alton Jones Jr, to go from 80 something place on day 1 to the top 12.  Glad he was on my team though
    • Added these for the fry pan to go with some turkey also.  
    • If you haven't planted your tomatoes yet......plant them laying down on their side. Pick off all the branches up to the top.Lay the plant in a trench and cover the stem up to the top. Put a soil pillow under the top. Just be careful not to break the stem (I have). Tomatoes are the only plant that will send out roots from the buried stem. You will wind up with a large root ball to feed the plant. This also puts the roots closer to the surface where the soil is warmer instead of deep where it is cool.
    • Another disaster. I tried making relatively safe picks, and bombed. I have gone from the top 60 after two events all the way down to just over the 90th percentile. I need to just go with my gut
    • that is what we were thinking too.
    • Live link.   http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/features/webcams/falconcam/index.html      


    • BEFORE BEGINNING

      Before you begin, make sure you have a good strong battery and make sure it's charged up. If you have a bad or weak battery, you may want to replace it because if it doesn't crank good and strong, you are likely to get a low, inaccurate reading. Make sure your engine is warmed up to operating temperature(if possible). About 10 minutes of riding should do.

      First, take out the spark plug and thread in the adapter for the compression tester. Make sure you have the correct size adapter for your particular ATV. Slide your kill switch to the "off" position. Some ATVs won't crank over with the kill switch in the "off" position, so if yours is like this, then you will need to either unhook your ignition coil or ground the end of the spark plug wire to a good ground. You can use a jumper wire with alligator clips on each end to ground it. Next, make sure the throttle is in the wide open position. You can either hold the throttle lever with your thumb or you may be able to tape it or use a zip tie to fasten it to your handlebars to hold it in the wide open position. If you don't have the throttle in the wide open position, you will probably get too low of a reading. Also, if you are testing a newly rebuilt engine, the engine needs to have been run for, at least, 30 or 40 minutes or you will probably get too low of a reading.

      NOTE: Before you begin with the actual test, make sure the threaded adapter is screwed in good and isn't leaking any air out around it.

      ACTUAL TESTING

      With the throttle in the wide open position, push the start button and crank the engine over until the hand on the gauge stops moving. Each time the engine turns over the hand should raise a little more until it reaches the maximum compression of the engine. When it stops, that is your compression reading. This usually takes no more than 10 seconds. Try to avoid cranking an engine for more than 10 seconds at a time as this is hard on the starter and the battery. Now, push the relief valve on your compression gauge and that will reset the hand back to zero. It's a good ideal to repeat the test a couple or three times to make sure you get an accurate reading. On kick start models, it will be the same procedure, but obviously you will be kicking it over instead of using a start button. Worn piston rings and cylinder walls will increase the number of strokes it takes to reach the maximum reading. If you're kicking, it could possibly take as many as 10-20 kicks to get the highest reading.

      THE READING

      You will need to check your repair manual for your particular model for the correct compression specifications. See note below. Usually, an engine will run OK if it has at least 100 PSI of compression. Most engines will have somewhere between 100-250 and some as high as 300 PSI, depending on the engine. Sometimes they will run with under 100 PSI, but usually not very well. If you get a low reading, you can do a "wet test" to try to help determine the problem.

      If your reading is too high, then you probably have carbon built up on your piston and combustion chamber.

      NOTE: You may get a low reading on some engines because some engines have a decompressor assembly built into the camshaft. Check the service manual for your quad to see whether or not your quad has a decompressor assembly built into the cam.

      WET TEST

      If you got a low reading, pour about 1-2 teaspoons of clean motor oil down into the cylinder through the spark plug hole and do the compression test again. If your reading increases, then your rings or cylinder walls are probably worn. If your reading doesn't increase, then it's probably your valves. You could have a bent valve, you may have leaky valve seats, or your valve clearance may not be adjusted properly. Also, low compression can be caused by a blown head gasket.

      CAUSES OF LOW COMPRESSION

      *Worn piston rings or worn or damaged cylinder walls
      *Leaking valves
      *Valve clearance not properly set
      *Blown head gasket

      CAUSE OF HIGH COMPRESSION (stock engines)

      *Carbon buildup in combustion chamber and on piston

      NOTE: Compression testing is a good way to keep track or "gauge" the wear in your engine. When you first get your ATV or when you rebuild the engine in your ATV, you can do a compression test and then later on, you can do them periodically. This will help you determine the wear in your engine each time you do a compression test and will guide you in knowing when your engine needs rebuilding.

      This is about all I can think of. I hope I didn't leave anything out and I hope this helps everyone with their compression tests.
    • As dumb as this sounds how is this done?
  • Our Sponsors