Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Craigums

Locating the weedline

13 posts in this topic

So I've been hearing everyone saying the fish are congregating along the deep weedline. How do you locate that, Do you need to have electronics?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's how most people will do it. On a flasher, you will see a very thick broken up, varying line all the way to the bottom. On a graph, well, depending on the graph it will look blobby and "weedy".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need to have electronics to find a weedline. Pick up a jig or crankbait and you should be able to find the edge of a weedline by feel. However, if I had the choice, I'd choose to have electronics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've learned to use carolina rig or jigs to pickup my weedline locations because I didn't have electronics and I fished from canoes. Just try to feel for some drag, bump, etc....then keep moving till it clears. You'll pull up bits of weed, algea, or be hung on a rock. Part of it is feel, another is like a 6th sense...and the last is luck. Do it for a while and you actually get a feel for it. Your mind paints the picture for you. Worked for me for years before a real boat came into the picture with electronics.

Imagine how many ppl will be fishless if you took their depth finders away?!?!? =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Throw a crankbait - I find one every time I do....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As many said, you dont need electronics, but they sure help. Often times what you see with your eye is not the weed edge. Many times weed are deeper than that but are outside our view. However they show up on electronics quite well.

I have said this before, but its worth saying again. Learning how to use and read good electronics is a larger skill in fishing than feeling for bites. But thats just my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It really is amazing how electronics have changed our great sport....The newer sonar/gps/lake mapping units are amazing with regard to what you can determine and mark. It's not just finding the weed edges but the type of weeds and the type of bottom including sand, rocks, gravel, bends, inside turns, sharp breaks, etc.

It's all about structure and developing patterns around where the fish are. Those of us who have fished for many years and fish competitively understand this when fishing in the summer months. Interestingly a walleye guy won the Minnesota bound tournament Rich Boggs. He was fishing big structure on the main lake.. Al Lindner who finished 4th was also fishing main lake structure... Hmmmmm....

I was in the boat with 3 really good fisherman last weekend during the Minnesota bound tourney on my home lake Gull... Charlie Moore, Jim Picha, and John Peterson.. By the way all great guys and enjoyable to be in a boar with!!! All spent most of their time on the edges looking for green cabbage weed and in particlar if we found green cabbage and coon tail together in 10 - 14 ft of water we found bass in good numbers.

As we move toward fall when the weeds start to die off it's then time to look for the green cabbage and coon tail..

Late summer and early fall is a great time to be on the water and in particlar catch big fish of all species.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always have my electronics on, but I prefer to fish my way to the weed edge using a crank or jig or plastic. The deeper fish are not alway on the weedline. Sometime, fishing your way out to find the edge, you will find the fish are in the weeds or the fish are off past the weed edge. The weedline is a great reference point when locating schools of fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, electronics will make it much, much easier to locate a weedline but like others said you can use a lure to tell what kind of structure you are on. Its a good skill to have, really pay attention when you're using a lure, are you hitting rocks, gravel, weeds, etc.?

I think you also need to consider water clarity and depth of weed growth I think weedlines are going to be most productive in lakes that have a visibilty over 2' right now. The deep water provides cooler temps as well as cover. If the water is murky Id look for deep hard bottom areas or thick shallow cover.

Finding the weedline isnt going to be the end of your search. It will help if you can find differences in the weedlines Points, turns, weeds near dropoffs, rocks, or where two different types meet will up your chances of finding fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great information fellas! Thanks a million.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hiya -

I really have to agree that a combo approach of the ability to interpret electronics + developing a sense of feel is a really good skill set. You don't need to have the top of the line electronics to learn to read them well either. Cripes - I was a flasher guy up until just a few years ago, and I still miss them at times. Electronics give you a general picture of what's down there, and some of the details as well. A sense of feel helps fill in the blanks and interpret the fine details. In deeper water, a combination of a deep diving crankbait and a jigworm is a pretty potent interpretive tool set. Back when I was bass fishing virtually every day, and most of it was jigworming, I could tell what kind of weeds I was hitting just by feel. My skills have atrophied some but even at that I can still feel my way down a weedline and find the little points, dips, and transitions while only glancing at my electronics occasionally. TUTF makes a great point - finding the little anomalies along a weedline are really what you're after, because that's often where the fish are. It's a learned skill and it takes some practice, but boy is it worth it. Once you start getting a feel for what different kinds of weeds and bottom content feel like with a jig or a crank, and then put that together with what the same stuff looks like on your electronics, you start to get pretty dangerous smile

JConrad - you had some pretty good boat partners up there. Charlie Moore is one of my oldest and closest friends, and I've known John P. for close to 20 years as well. Won't find nicer guys... Heard the event was a hoot. I almost fished it, even though I'm not really a tournament guy, but my son's 3rd birthday trumped it smile

Cheers,

Rob Kimm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob, it really was a blast.... Charlie and John were both great guys to be in a boat with... When you are drawing for a partner you just don't know who you might get.... I was very fortunite to draw these guys... I hope I have the opportunity to do it again... When you see Charlie tell him I said hello.

This really is a terrific forum and we all continue to all learn and benefit from the experience here...

Joel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • DonBo, good luck on your bow quest,  your father raised you well!  What a great way to celebrate life by sharing a hunt together.
    • My family has LIfe 360 on our phones. It allows you to know exactly where that phone is at all times. My teenage kids were not to hip on the idea until my wife explained that you either have the app or you don't have a phone. It already saved a phone. My son dropped his phone in the middle of a bean field last summer.  We were able to use the app to drive a wheeler to within 10ft. Well worth it.
    • My personal opinion on the backup pumps is that they are a stop gap to buy you enough time to minimize the amount of water that backs up during a torrential storm while you get your primary pumps on a generator.    Obviously the biggest factor is to figure out how much water can enter the drainage system during the heaviest downpours and that can help you decide what gpm you need to stay ahead of the water. If you get a bigger backup pump then you will burn through a battery faster.    If you don't get a lot of water in the system ever and if the sump pump only runs periodically during even heavy rains and wet weather then you can get more run time from a smaller system.    There really isn't a way to say exactly what you need to be 100%safe unless you know exactly what flows you have.
    • Already doing many of these.  It's slowly improving.
    • I was just getting some info on this unit: http://www.zoellerpumps.com/en-ap/product/63-basement-sentry#features     I am sure you could hook up multiple batteries as well
    • Sunday, pulled a group of 3 toms from about 500 yds across private into the public only to hang up at 60 yds. We worked them for 2 hrs and they never got in front of the blind. They finally got closer, but instead of going in front of the blind, they got behind the blind at about 5 yards inside the woodline and could hear them stepping on twigs. Man what a rush. Sadly, they walked back onto private and out of our lives LOL. Kinda wish I was hunting with a shotgun!   3 or 4 gobblers were rattling off behind us in the woods in the morning and shut up by 7. The 3 that we got to come in from private were to the other side and they didn't gobble til they were close enough to see/hear our setup. Those two hours were between 8 and 10. Will try again.
    • They will lose 90 to 100 games again this year. They do not have the pitching to even get to 500. Santana will be our lone all-star and be traded before end of year. Hope something changes but they did not add anything for starters or offensive so until they do we will get the same junk. Really sucks cause i love watching and listening to the games all summer long.
    • % of people that have picked that person. 
    • Some rainy river monsters! 61" 60" and a 54"! Have a look!  
    • Many big sturgeon boated this past week again.  Has been a great year for sturgeon so far up and down the river.  Fish different holes until you find fish.  Use a 3 ounce no roll sinker, a 1-1.5 foot leader, and a circle hook loaded (called a sturgeon rig) with frozen shiners and crawlers for best results. Anchor boat up stream of a deeper hole and pitch sturgeon rig into the hole. Heavy equipment is preferred.  Pike fishing is going good right now in shallow bays and on the Rainy River. Best methods so far are using buzz baits or lying a frozen cisco on bottom with a hook and weight(similar to a sturgeon rig but with less weight).   Pike are active in bays. The lake and bays and water starting to warm up and pike are being caught.  Pike are open all year up on LOW.   Up at the NW Angle, the ice is gone and it's open water.  Remember, walleyes open May 13th, pike and crappies open all year for LOW MN and sturgeon fishing through May 15th and then again July 1st.
  • Our Sponsors