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Ralph Wiggum

Dormant?

10 posts in this topic

At this time of year, if it looks dead and u haven't been watering it, its dormant. The cool season grasses we use in MN go dormant when daytime highs start pushing 85 degrees.

You keep your lawn from going dormant by watering and irrigating it. If you fertilize along with a bit of water will prevent it from going dormant. But this means you need to get the lawn mower out on hot days.

Personally just let the lawn go dormant. That way you wont have to worry about mowing on hot evenings. Save the gas for the boat instead of the lawn mower.

***Please remember*** if you are going to mow on hot days do it in the evenings as mowing stresses the lawn causing damage. Also never water in the heat of the day. So many of my neighbors have their irrigation running in the middle of the day. This is supposedly common sense but so many people do it.

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Here! Here! with watering during the day. It frustrates me beyond recognition to see these idiots doing this. Or better yet during the day with a 30 mph wind!!!

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How does one distinguish a dormant lawn from a dead one?
Grab the grass and give a light steady pull,If it comes out by the roots easily,Its probably gone.If not the root sysyem is there and its sleepin.

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One other way to tell is if your grass is a "tan" color, then it's dormant.

If it's gray or white, then it's dead.

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You have never been on a golf course and seen water run in the afternoon?

Sometimes on warm days when it is windy out, it isn't a bad idea to lightly water the turf to cool it off so it doesn't get to dry.

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a good note to water early in the morning if you water at night the sediment in the water can hurt the grass. when you water in the morning the morning du will help delute the sediment and your lawn will look better.

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The problem with watering during the afternoon is that a huge portion evaporates before it has time to soak in or have any effect at all. Also there are no studies that have shown the cooling effect.

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.....Also there are no studies that have shown the cooling effect.

Does that mean it doesn't cool or that it hasn't been proven?

I can argue to the fact that when I start my irrigation, the area around my zones feel much cooler. Stand 10 feet away and its still pretty warm. I would never run my irrigation just to try and "cool" the area, but it does make sense. I do NOT think there would be any benefit.

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I have also heard, the water droplets on the grass blades act as a magnify glass of sorts from the midday sun rays when not watered enough during the day time, which can damage the grass and possibly cause dormancy. Just what I heard!

I have always watered early in the am and just when the sun goes down. I have no complaints I might add.

I will add, watering too much or solely at night, could promote mold/moss and fungus growth.

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