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JessEm

Bought A New-used Boat.... What Now??

12 posts in this topic

Hello All,

This web site is tremendous! All the info and reading here is awesome!

Here's my question. I just bought a boat from a private party and at some point I would like to get a check up/tune up done, as well as winterization. I'm wondering, time frame wise, what is the most to efficient (cheapest and effective) way to handle this... winterize this fall, then tune-up in the spring? Or, tune-up and winterize at the same time? Is there work that needs to be done in the spring that would make more sense to get it tuned-up then?

While we're at it, is this something I could learn to do myself, or have someone teach me -- for a price of course, or am I just better off taking it to someone who knows what they're doing??

A referral to someone who is reasonable and does a good job would be great. Preferably they would do it AND teach me at the same time, but a good referral to someone who will just do it is fine too.

I'm in Bloomington and the boat is a '92 Ranger 482V with a

outboard Mercury XR6 150 motor. For the record, supposedly $5K worth of work was done to the motor 3 years ago... It seems to run great and I'd like to keep it that way!

Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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BTW, email the referral to jessemerson at mailcan dot com. Thamks!

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Welcome to our little corner of the net. Its chocked full of info and people who are willing to share.

I can't help you with your question, but I wanted to say hi

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Thanks Powerstroke! It looks like we're practically neighbors Bloom/EP.

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I can tell you what I do at least. I winterize and tune up in the fall - change wheel bearings/grease, etc. I want that rig ready to go when I come out in the Spring.

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Welcome to FM. You can learn to do the winterizing and to re-pack your berrings on your own. If I can do it, anyone can.

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There is a lot of stuff you can do yourself.

How does the motor run? If it runs good, don't mess with it with the exception of checking or maybe changing the plugs. Lube everything that has a zerk and all linkages using marine grade lubes. Your manuals for the engine, boat and trailer should tell you what and how. Change out the fuel filters and add some Seafoam to existing fuel. Clean up the battery connections and inspect the fuses. Pull the batteries and have them tested. Inspect and lube the trailer bearings (youtube has videos on how to do this). You might want to have someone who knows what they are doing inspect the steering system as safety is a concern and the boat has a few years on it. Have fun with your new toy. Got to love it, EH!!!!

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Welcome to fishing minnesota!

As Down Deep said, how does the motor run now, or what is it that you want to do a tune up for?

You can have them do the tune up and winterization at the same time - in the spring you pull it out, run it on the hose a bit to get the fogging fluid cleared and you're ready to go!

If you're mechanically inclined you should be able to do the winterization yourself, it's not too difficult.

marine_man

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Thanks everyone for the warm welcomes and the advice. The motor runs great so maybe just an inspection of everything is what I'd like.

Otherwise, this is what I have so far:

- Do necessary work when winterizing so it's ready to go in the spring.

- Winterization I can do myself, once I learn how.

- Change trailer wheel bearings and grease. (youtube video)

I didn't get the owners manuals and my guess is that I probably need them, right? Does anyone know where I can get them for a 92 Ranger boat/trailer and a Mercury XR6 150 outboard?

Also, I've been running this boat on the river a lot lately so I'm wondering if any special considerstions will need to be made for that silty water?

Thanks again for all the help.

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I'd suggest you pick up a service manual. Because you just bought it and are running in that kind of water, I'd replace the water pump impeller. Also, because of the silt, I'd pay close attention to the housing liner for grooves. Most of the time you can get away with just replacing the impeller but your situation may be different.

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Go to the Merc HSOforum. I think you can order one there. There may even be some manuals in PDF format. A Merc dealer may have one as well. You do need to have a manual and it is best to read it cover to cover.

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