Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

  • Announcements

    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Sign in to follow this  
Paul

Need some Portraiture Help. I'm over my head, I think.

Recommended Posts

Ok, so being the capable photographer I am, I have agreed to a nice little paying gig to do a Senior Portrait Shoot. Now this is new to me so I need a little advice. Looking for some advice about poses, backgrounds, lighting etc. We are going to try for some outdoor and some indoor. Probably mostly head shots but want some full body shots with sceneray in the back ground. Any tips or hints you guys wish to spare. If you don't wish to spread any huge trade secrets I understand so if you want to email me you can. I will be shooting with a 17-85, and my 100-400. And will be picking up a Flash in the next few days, as soon as I decide between the 430 and the 580.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats and good luck. My only advice would be to get a good book. Also, look at some pros examples for poses. I'm sure if you check online, you'll find galleries from portait photographers, which will give you some very good ideas for posing. The outdoor shots should be a breeze, considering you get out early or late in the day and keep the subject out of the shadows. Personally, I wouldn't be real anxious to tackle indoor shots without a multi light setup, nice backdrops and props.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the set up that Mike mentions - multiple lights, backdrops, etc. A few basic rules as far as positioning will allow you to take acceptable photos. I don't do a lot of portrait photography with just a camera mounted strobe, but nice work can be done with that as well. Steve does quite a bit with this and can probably help the most with that aspect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul I wish I could help. Unfortunately there are so many things that go into doing good senior photos that it would be almost impossible to cover them all here. Just some issues to ponder.

I find that the outdoor shots are more difficult to execute because of lighting issues and dealing with sun and all the other variables. Speedlights are OK for this type of work but only having one will limit what type of creative work you can do. You can get good shots, it just is harder to get some of the looks that seem popular these days.

Do you want harsh lighting, soft lighting, fill lighting, ambient light on background or darker background, and on and on. So many variables and most likely little time and equipment. What about Custom WB and color correction card for getting the correct skin tones and colors both indoors and out. Sure you will shoot RAW and correct in post but how do you get correct colors? I've found results are so much better when you get it right in the camera that I rarely rely on post to correct more than just the occasional mistake on my part, and they do happen!

Indoors do you have access to additional lights and a studio set up? If not you are going to have be very creative to replicate the studio look. Again one flash setups are a bit tougher to pull off. Do you have colored backgrounds? What type of clothing and color is it? Backgrounds to compliment that, and on and on. Will you use natural light complimented by artificial?

There is a reason that senior photographers charge what they charge. A large investment in lights and studio equipment. Can you do it with your equipment? Yes but it will be difficult at best.

Lenses, on the wide end many photographers use many different options, I love the 17-40. On the portrait side virtually every portrait photographer I know uses a 70-200/2.8. Backgrounds, backgrounds, backgrounds and the ability to manipulate them with DOF. The 70-200 does so many beautiful things with portraits.

Poses are as varied as the subject. I always spend time talking about what the subject wants out of the photographs, what style are they looking for. That in a large part determines what lighting to use, clothing to wear, locations to shoot and what you do in studio.

I mention much of this not to discourage but to understand the complexity of what goes into this type of photography. I personally turned down a lot of senior work until I had worked up enough equipment and knowledge to use it to get the results I was happy with. I now only do sports related work and work together with a photographer who specializes in the studio and location work.

I prefer to carry three flashes, 3 strobes, a power source to operate them, diffusers, umbrellas, light stands, light meter, diffusion panels, a couple of camera bodies with various lenses and an assistant if I can pull it off. Can you do it with less...yes you can. Can you pull off these shots with one light, yes again with limited options and a good plan of how you want to light your subject.

PP work for senior work is also a whole process of its own, so many different looks and ways to manipulate. Softening techniques, eye brighting, catch lights, grunge styles, and again on and on.

Spend some time researching some of the work out there and you will get ideas that should help you. The most important thing is working with the subject and getting an idea what they want from the shoot. Good luck Paul.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:
PP work for senior work is also a whole process of its own, so many different looks and ways to manipulate. Softening techniques, eye brighting, catch lights, grunge styles, and again on and on.

Not to mention the cosmetic work of getting rid of zits, blemishes etc. Dan, thanks for giving a more complete answer than I. I started, and realized that it would have to be at least as long as yours to even outline it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ken, as you are aware there are just so many aspects with the senior photo market. I don't do any beyond sports styles but work with someone who does and man there is so much more than meets the eye.

It is so hard to try and answer and or give an idea of how to pull it all off just because, well its complicated.

If you are looking for just some one flash photos on location with basic poses and lighting you may be able to pull something together. I try to remember these photos will be used in a year book for all to see and hanging in a clients house for years.

I just wish I could give an easy answer. Sorry Paul.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's exactly why, when people ask me to take there family pictures and senior pictures I emphatically say NO THANK YOU.

Too hard to please everyone. Isn't that what it all boils down to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul,

Here's a simple shot that I've used many times and the clients seem to like it:

CL1.jpg

JS1.jpg

Neither of these photos have been edited yet. In the second, his head should have been tilted straight up or slightly away from the building. Both taken with a 17-40L and a 550 EX Speedlite, at -2/3 ec.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I have access to some lights from my buddy who does video work for the Discovery Channel and National Geographic and only uses the stuff once a month or so so that is no problem. I have a large muslim cloth which I need to dye yet, haven't decided what color yet but probably something light in color leaning towards yellow,blue,greenish. This particular client will be fairly easy to please so I am not to worried about end results. PP is not a problem either, I have been working on blemish controll for the last month or two on my photoshop cs3 lesson plan booka and CD. (all on computer so no actuall reading just reading the moniter then try the lessons.)

I spent the afternoon today at Barnes and Nobles looking at several different books that discusss poseing and lighting. I have realized that I will be working with mostly natural light and some flash fill. That is another thing I'll need to work on. I have not owned a flash since I switched from Film SLR to digital SLR, should be pretty much the same I suppose. I will probably fashion some reflectors out of cardboard and tin foil. (Saw this done at my Engagement pic session in a studio, worked well).

Props will be my only down side, but since the kid does no sports, hasn't got a car, no hobbys really, I will just use what is laying around. There is a railroad museum in Fargo that is very well lit in the day and has mucho scenery to work with so that may be my props. Also the Warehouse district has some cool old buildings for backgrounds that I think will be fun as well.

I have 3o days to cram as much info in my thick skull as a I can. Thanks everyone for the replys, it adds lots of dimensions to think about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

White foam board make a nice soft reflector and you don't have to "manufacture" it. How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, practice, practice! Willing models to practice on?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the film days, my daughter was happy to let me practice on her. However, when it came time for her real senior photos, she insisted on us paying the big bucks for a different photographer. whistle However, I did tackle it for one season, along with a few weddings and small children. I detested weddings, due to the lack of cooperation and frayed nerves. I didn't mind the seniors. When it was just one on one, they cooperated very well. I did have a downtown studio setup with a few different colored backgrounds, a few props and strobes with umbrellas. You should definitely have a few different colored backgrounds. It's not like the good ol' days when we had our photos taken in our suit and tie. grin Nowadays, they seem to want to have at least a few changes of clothes, and one background probably won't cut it. I believe that modern photographers charge a certain sitting fee which inludes x number of clothes changes and anymore than that, there is an extra charge.

Would I ever do something like this again? Nope. Although, nowadays it would be easier with the use of digital. If I was going to go back into any type of studio photography, it would be a pet portait studio. I get along easier with animals. wink

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:
If I was going to go back into any type of studio photography, it would be a pet portait studio. I get along easier with animals.

Amen with that comment. I am not too far away from the start of that buisness also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good advice so far, Paul. I just got back from a Twin Cities wedding (note the time of this post), so my brain is a little fried.

I specialize in outdoor portraiture. I don't want or need a studio. It feels like clutter to me. Not bashing any studio photog, because it's a vital part of photography and done well it's stunning.

But I'm an outside portrait type of dude. The whole point of doing a portrait outside instead of in a studio is to include part of the environment in the shot. I've done senior portraits along the shores of Lake Superior, in the BWCAW and in the woods near Bemidji, to name just a few locations. In most cases, it's best to see if the outdoor client has a special outdoor place that has significance for them.

And whether you do it indoors or outdoors, grab a good friend or family member and work with them first. That way you'll be able to work out any bugs in your setup/approach in private. It just won't do to fumble around too much with settings when a client's waiting for things to get going.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Posts

    • sorta helps, I'll find it...  thanks... me and google just got it.....     have to go see!!
    • Hall of Fame? You must be joking...... Every player starts out like that. No one starts out with a 23 m dollar contract. He still averaged about 15 million per year for his career, that average probably goes up if he plays past 2018. I think he will be ok.
    • Joe was also the 74th highest paid player the year he won the MVP. You may say he is over paid now but he was underpaid 1st half of his career. @Bobby Bass   I don't think Joe is a future Hall of Famer, not even close to borderline but a great player none the less. I think if the Twins would have made a deeper playoff runs back when Morneau was healthy and Santana was Cy-young would have helped. But Joes playoff numbers are terrible. I could maybe see HOF if he would have stayed at catcher his entire career though..... But he will more than likely end up winning a gold glove at 2 positions, and with one being catcher that is pretty elite.
    • Big Dave most if not all pro contracts are paying you for what you have already done with the hope that you will continue to produce. Looking at todays contract Joe's is not to out of line for a future Hall of Famer
    • Great! He is finally earning a contract close to what he is being paid. 
    • thx.  directions are on the site below. just across river from college    http://www.munsingerclemens.com/the-gardens/munsinger-gardens 2 areas, up top and down by river
    • Free agency is far from a sure thing, if there are young centers out there (big if) you have to compete with maybe 10 or 20 other teams and pay way over what you should. You have control of nothing and are at the whims of a player everyone is chasing. Same with trades, very easy to swing and miss. By most account we were in on Ryan Johansen with the Preds but Columbus wanted Jones over Brodin and I don't blame them. 
    • Good stuff but time wiill tell. Not buying the "oh we might lose him as a UFA"...so what, with that kind of money we could buy just as good and younger to give us more of a future...which we desparately need to be thinking about.  Fletch is walking a tightrope and it is going to break IMO.
    • Come on BB, you are better than that. You as much as anyone know that ONE player doesn't make an NHL Team a Stanley Cup contender so why put that blame on him. Sure, a player like Crosby certainly helps, but we aren't talking about the money that Crosby is getting here either. Comparing Koivu's contracts to equivalent players with similar production is quite compelling. He has performed better than many of his peers for his current contract and with the lower AV of his new deal if he continues similar numbers it will be a bargain. I wasn't too happy about the NMC either, but I take that as a bargaining chip so CF didn't have to go with a longer term deal. 2 years is sufficient and I think it works well for both parties. You are right, there are many people out there with more knowledge about the market and what he could have gotten elsewhere and when it may have made sense to sign him, but the fact is you don't want to wait to sign him until after the season for if no other reason at all than to allow him to be a UFA and hear other offers. This will be my last post about the Koivu extension because clearly we don't see eye to eye on whether it made/makes sense, but I assure you there are a large number of "hockey minds" that are in agreement with me on this. Here is some afternoon reading for you: https://www.hockeywilderness.com/2017/9/20/16332552/mikko-koivu-contract-extension-minnesota-wild-criticism-overpaid-chuck-fletcher-cap-space
    • Red admiral i believe.
  • Our Sponsors