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goblueM

North Fork of the Crow

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Anybody paddled it recently? Paddled from Kingston to Bill Anderson Memorial Park and boy is it a mess. It's a designated water trail route by the DNR but I'm gonna advise that it be taken off the list - lots of skinny water, and numerous logjams, live trees over the river, etc. I didn't see ANY sign of use on the river, just curious if anybody has been down it at all

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I'm on the middle fork alot,it's low and yes very few paddle it! I've never seen anyone,I like being on wild waters and log jams are part of that.If you belive its a mess and hassle for you,You should consider staying on different water,maybe in the city where routes are kept unnatural for those who think everything should be easy.Your the first yaker I've ever heard complain of scenic natural areas.

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Dude, you got it backwards man, I like that stuff - I've paddled over 1500 miles in the last 8 years. I'm just saying its not exactly safe for your everyday park paddler. I work for the Water Trails crew, its our crew's job to paddle the rivers and remove hazards. We saw no sign of use at all and solid obstructions everywhere. There was poor access, absolutely no signage for the canoe campsites, which were far and few between, etc. Just not very suitable for a state designated canoe route.

And lay off the attitude, nowhere did I complain about it, just said that it was a mess. Also didn't say I kayaked it, it was in canoes.

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If I read the original post correctly were you saying that as a designated water trail route it may be paddled by people who think it is easy and safe for begineers? If that is what you meant then I have to agree that it should be removed from the list. I would assume of course that this wouldn't stop people from being able to paddle it but rather leave it to those who are a little more experienced, and it would also eliminate the need to "unnaturalize it" for the everyday crowd.

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Dude, you got it backwards man, I like that stuff - I've paddled over 1500 miles in the last 8 years. I'm just saying its not exactly safe for your everyday park paddler. I work for the Water Trails crew, its our crew's job to paddle the rivers and remove hazards. We saw no sign of use at all and solid obstructions everywhere. There was poor access, absolutely no signage for the canoe campsites, which were far and few between, etc. Just not very suitable for a state designated canoe route.

And lay off the attitude, nowhere did I complain about it, just said that it was a mess. Also didn't say I kayaked it, it was in canoes.

Is thePomme de Terre or Chippewa by appleton designated route?? You should paddle them then state Trees over the water,Log jams and when the water is low its skinny! The Crow is a piece o cake.

Crow River, North Fork

The Crow River, North Fork flows southeast from Lake Koronis for about 125 miles until it joins the Mississippi River at Dayton. Although the North, Middle and South forks of the Crow are all part of a state-designated canoe and boating route, the North Fork is generally considered to be the main stem and the best for canoeing. The river is generally smooth flowing with a few class I rapids in the Forest City area. North Fork Crow Map (Instructions for printing large PDF maps.)

Water characteristics - check the river level reports.

The North Fork is small, shallow and fairly clean from the Lake Koronis Spillway to Kingston. A two-mile stretch of the river below Lake Koronis has been channelized. River obstructions in this reach make canoeing difficult, particularly in high water. Although rapids are not difficult, hidden trees can tip canoes and overhanging branches may strike canoeists. While unlawful, river neighbors sometimes string fences across the river. Canoeists need to be watchful for these obstructions and should notify the DNR. The upper reaches of the North Fork may be impassable in low water.

Thats just part of it!

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