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ec30_06

stihl chainsaw

17 posts in this topic

I am wonder what a fair price tp pay for a stihl ms360 pro chainsaw would be. The saw is a 2005 and looks to be in good shape. It also has a new bar and chain on it. Is the new bar and chain on a saw that new a red flag that it was used hard?

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Brand new its about $600. Unfortunately they don't come down in value much, especially if they are in good shape. What size bar is it running? Is the chain a safety chain or is it the semi-chisel or full chisel? That will tell about the type of use its had.

New bar and chain doesn't have to be a red flag. I would take off the air cleaner and look in there. Take off the sprocket cover and examine the sprocket for wear. Also look at the chain catch on the bottom of the saw. Is it really beat up? Is it brand new? Even the best users throw a chain once or twice, but if the chain catch is really chewed up or is brand new then I would wonder about hard use. Also look at the rubber bushings on the handles.

I think if it was in good shape and the saw has a new bar and chain, I would pay $350-400 for sure, maybe more. The bar and chain are worth $50 depending on quality and chisel type. The 360 Pro is designed to be a mid-size pro saw. I love the one I have at work. It handles everything except the biggest removals. The power is great. I use an 18" bar on that one. I also have a MS460 Pro and I prefer the 360 because its lighter and easier to handle unless I've got a big job. The 360 is a great all-around saw.

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Great advice. I would of thought an 18" bar on a 360 would be on the smallish side?

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I run a 20" on my MS310 with no trouble.

My dad has used many saws over the years and he was skeptical the first time he picked up mine to saw through an Ash tree that had fallen in my yard.

After he made a few cuts, he stood there in disbelief to the power the Stihl had and how nice it cut compared to other saws that he either used or owned.

Great info from Powerstroke.

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The MS360 had recommended bar lengths of 16-25". Although I have no doubt that the saw can handle a 24" bar, I wouldn't bother. The saw has more power and a better balance with the 18" bar. If you cut something from both sides, you can get a 30+" cut.

If I wanted a larger bar on there a 20" bar would be more than fine.

I guess it depends on what type of chain you use and the aggressiveness of the cut. Safety chains use fewer teeth on the chain for fewer cutting edges and no weight savings. Also the tooth is designed to be less aggressive to prevent kickback. This is good for beginners and homeowners who do not have a lot of experience and those who don't use all the safety gear.

Full chisel chain has a very aggressive cut and does not have the "safety link". Instead the gap link is just a tie strap in the chain. This is a lighter chain for more power and a more aggressive cut.

Semi-chisel chain is a compromise of the two. It will have an extra chain guide in front of the tooth to help with kickback, but it will have the aggressiveness of full chisel teeth.

On Stihl chain, the safety chains have a green link, chisel chains have yellow.

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I eneded up getting the saw for $312, and have cut up a load of firewood already with it. It is in great shape. It is by far the best cutting saw I have ever used. I have already been offered $450 for it. It has the 20" bar, and I have another saw that used to have an 18" bar. I put a 16" bar on that saw to use for ladder work and small branches. It seems to handle the 16 way better than it did the 18. No more johnsereds and husqvarna saws for me; the stihl is the way to go.

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You got a great deal for $312, ec, and it's nice to know that saw is a great cutter. I've been using Stihl since the early 1980s and won't have anything else. Got my Dad a johnsered for the lake cabin, but love my Stihl saws.

Great info in general from Powerstroke, too!

I have an MS290 now with a 16 inch bar and a couple of aggressive chisel chains. Only thing I use a saw for any more these days is cutting firewood. Of course, I go through 8 to 10 full cords of firewood in a year so there's a lot of cutting, but it's not very demanding cutting.

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Thats a great deal!!! Does he have any other saws for sale?

I think anybody who does any amount of cutting on the ground should invest in a set of chaps. They are well worth it. I've been doing professional tree work for about 7 years and I've cut into my chaps 3 times. One time was really bad and I have my leg because of it. The other times saved me from a nasty cut. Its cheap insurance and a single pair will last many many years.

Eye and ear protection is up to you, but I think its a very cheap protection too.

Enjoy your new saw. It sounds like you'll have it for a long time.

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I 2nd everything that's been said. I've got a MS270 and love it. Used fairly hard for 2 years now and only routine maintenance needed. I've gone through 3 chains, but nothing on the saw itself has broken.

Chaps are a must IMO. I've never hit mine, but my buddy did. Can only imagine what would have happened had he not been wearing them. I also have the helmet/ear/face shield combo and have found it very nice. It really protects from getting poked in the face, branches in the back of the head, and of course getting stuff in your eyes. It's worth the $$ to feel safe and protected.

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No more johnsereds and husqvarna saws for me; the stihl is the way to go.

Interesting....The Stihl's are very good, don't get me wrong, but if you ask anyone in the logging business, they use Husqvarna more often than Stihl.

I've used both and own a Husqvarna. Both are great. Just an observation.

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Kinda like Ford vs CHevy. I personally think Stihl's are better overall, but I do like the large Husky's like the 395XP. They have a better intake design so the filter stay's cleaner longer. The weight balance is better but I don't like the side mounted decompression button.

As far as mid-size saws go I would take a Stihl or Jonsered before a Husky. I don't know why, but I've seen tons of problems with their smaller saws not holding up to professional use.

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Come on now Roofer, you know that Stihl's are better than Husky's! grin And Suzuki's are better than Kawasaki's! wink

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Come on now Roofer, you know that Stihl's are better than Husky's! grin And Suzuki's are better than Kawasaki's! wink

HA! Good one. smile

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Come on now Roofer, you know that Stihl's are better than Husky's! grin And Suzuki's are better than Kawasaki's! wink

And Hondas are better than Suzuki's grin

I know the city of Le Sueur used to be big with the Homelites (junk IMO) while they still made them, but have since switched over to Shindawa. They've had good luck with them.

I'll keep my Stihl.

Powerstroke,

after reading your posts, I had to check to see which chain was on my saw. Turned out I have the safety chain. I have a lot of wood to cut before this winter and may be heading for the dealer to get a chisel chain.

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If you are comfortable with your saw and you know the danger zones of the saw for kickback (tip of the bar, bottom 90 degrees) then a chisel chain may help you be more productive.

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Thanks Powerstroke.

I try to stick with trees that I can at least keep the tip of the bar through the trees and not bury it.

Worked with a guy who had a saw kick back and took out a few teeth. Not a pretty site. Kind of like a beaver getting in a fight with a chainsaw. The beaver lost.

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Like I said about the safety gear. I've been doing professionally for almost the last decade and I still wear the helmet with shield and the chaps. Kickback does happen but having a proper stance and knowing the dangers will save life and limb.

This has been a great discussion. I'm glad I can help. Let me know if anyone else has chainsaw questions.

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