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Slyster

Getting a new boat soon... A few questions.. possibly Stratos 17.5'

26 posts in this topic

OK... the Titanic is about to retire... want a few bass angler opinions on this boat and accessories from those in the know.

1- Any experience/opinions with the Stratos 17.5 fiberglass boat? (only $15K and my max budget)

2- Direct cable or electric foot peddle.. which is better for bass fishing? Also is the stock 40# enough for this boat? (I have a 55# electric peddle minn-kota already)

3- Yamaha 70 2-stroke (oil injected) a good motor?

Anyone around here fishing from a Stratos boat? It sure looks nice and wide (therefore stable)... I think it would be a better choice than the similar length Tracker (aluminum)...

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Sly,

I can't tell you much about the smaller Stratos. I have fished out of some of the 20 footers, and they seem nice. But, all Bass Boats kind of seem the same to me.

I like a cable driven bow mount. They react much quicker then the motor driven units. It helps when you need to turn away from a dock quickly. Plus, you can develop some directional steer-by-feel abilities with cable driven that you cannot get from the others.

I would bet a 70 gets that boat on plane with you and another guy and minimal gear. But, I doubt you will be overly impressed with it. What is Max HP for that boat? My guess is that a 115 would be a decent motor for that boat. But, as you said, budget influences need to be observed.

Have you thought about looking around for a used model of this boat or a similar model of another brand? I've got to think there are a few dealers and private parties looking to get rid of a lightly used boat or two right now.

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I own a 17'6" Stratos with a 110 Evinrude. I have had this boat since 93'. It is a fish and ski. Two guys fishing... plenty of power. Tubing,Skiing nothing there. This is the max for this boat and I have never been impressed with the power. I personally think it could handle a V-6. A 70 on that boat is not enough. Always go to the max on HP rating. As far as Trolling motors...it came with a cable drive... under powered...switched to a 50lb electronic drive plenty of power but slow to react. I would recommend a used boat. Lots out there with minimal hours.

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Sly- Here is my take.. .with the market the way it is now. Many people are selling their bigger boats. Why not look used? I would be willing to bet there are quite a few very nice bass boats out there in your 15K range. With your 2 kids that you fish with it might be nice to have an 18' boat at least. You would be surprised at the extra space an extra foot gives you.

as for the t-moter.. cable for me all the way.. I cant stand the other kind, but then again, I grew up on cable. However, its for the same reasons Mr.Esboldt stated, much faster to react, and you can drive them by feel, not haveing to look at where the head is facing.

As Tim the tool man Taylor always said.. MORE POWER... I have never heard anybody complain about having too much power. Get the best t-moter you can afford. 40 sounds very light to me. I have a 72lb on my boat and at times want more even.

to get back to my orig idea and to give you an idea... My current boat I bought in late 2003, its a 2001 Triton TR186(you have seen it) I drove to Kentucky, it was used, had 44 hours on the motor when I bought it, but picked it up for a steal, $13,500... There are very good used boats out there that people in our economy need to sell now as money is tight...

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Hey Sly, I haven't been in one of the new Stratos boats out there but I looked at the ones you are talking about at Cabelas on Saturday. I would have to say the 70 Yamaha doesn't quite seem like it would be enough motor on there. If you were able to upgrade to a 75 Optimax or a 90 Optimax you would probably be a lot happier.

But like the other guys said, if you can find a used boat, you would probably be able to get a lot more for your money. I know what you are thinking with buying new, they have some attractive financing available for them. I have been watching the list for a long time now checking out pricing on boats and what not and I assure you there are some smokin deals out there. Lots of people in financial trouble right now just looking to get what they owe on the toys, do some searching and you will find what you want for considerably less than new. Saw a 2000 Ranger 681 with a 2004 135 Opti, 74lb Maxxum, front and rear deck extensions, and LCX series gps/graphs bow and console go for 12k. It was my dream boat, and I woulda scooped it up for that if I had the cash.

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They are talking about trolling motors. You can have the electric motor drive turning, which is slower, or you can have cable driven which is more direct and takes a bit of learning to get used to. Usually, cable driven units are limited to the front deck for foot pedel placement where electric usually have a long cord allowing you to place the pedel anywhere in the boat.

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I guess I must have electric then because I have a longer cord. Is a cable driven unit where the foot control is sunk into the deck of the boat and the pedal moves forward and backward to turn the motor head? My pedal just sits on the deck and it's kind of awkward to work with because you have to put pressure on the left or right side of the pedal to turn the motor. I don't have a pedestal seat so it's hard to do standing or sitting.

I guess I should just use my remotes more often.

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Do a search on craigs list and some other websites first i would say, 15k can buy you a really nice used boat.

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to get back to my orig idea and to give you an idea... My current boat I bought in late 2003, its a 2001 Triton TR186(you have seen it) I drove to Kentucky, it was used, had 44 hours on the motor when I bought it, but picked it up for a steal, $13,500... There are very good used boats out there that people in our economy need to sell now as money is tight...

Were is a good format to start looking for used boats? Paper, Boat Trader, Craig's List?

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The list is a great spot to look from what I can see. There are typically 200-300 listings per day in MN. You can search down around Texas and find a lot of really good deals on bass boats down there.

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Craig- I looked for my boat online... If your willing to drive, there are great deals out there...

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If I found a really good deal it would be worth driving, what kind of sites did you start your search with and end up finding your Triton?

Thanks,

CP

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Thanks for the info! Believe it or not.. the max HP for this model (the 176XT)... is 75HP! And I was a Cabela's yesterday looking at it too!... it looks HUGE and so roomy to me compared to what I've been fishing out of for the last 5 years!... Google startos boats if you want to see it. I will definitely look into used as well. Sounds like for the same price I could get something a bit larger..

boat1.jpg

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Slyster,

If you want to try fishing out of a Stratos, let me know. I have a 1997 Stratos 285 Pro Elite w/150 Evinrude and I work in your area. Plus, it would only be half of your budget.

-Ryan

theluretour@gmail.com

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Do you mean you are selling it? Or used ones like yours are going for $7K or so.. How long in a 285? 285 feet? THAT'S HUGE! wink

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Sly, I believe the 285 was 18.5 feet with a dual console. Not 100% on that but I think that is the naming convention.

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If I had your budget, there is no doubt that I would go used. If you do your homework and have time to sit down and really search the web, you can find some great deals for less than $15K.

For about the past two years I've been looking for anything under $10,000 and have found some real nice used boats. Its mainly me just dreaming right now though smile

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That's me btw in the front of the boat in my picture. So any boat seems big! smile

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If someone wants to buy it, it's for sale. I really need more space for my camera/scuba gear, but I can make due with what I have. The boat is 18'5"-18'10" depending upon where you look at specs.

Check out classic bass or bass boat central for boats for sale and to get an idea of what they go for.

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17.5 ft boat/70 hp motor??? way...way underpowered.I run a 17 ft Nitro w/90 hp Johnson and it is 'BARELY' enough.

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Guys, the 176 Stratos that is being discussed is actually a pretty small boat in comparison to others. I don't think it is quite as wide as your Nitro bassphish, and it looked pretty light looking at all the features on it. I was up at Cabela's looking at this boat on Saturday, and I think with a 75 Opti on the back it might do pretty good. It wont be running 50 mph, but I think in the 35-40 range would be about right considering the size. That is somewhat slow compared to some of the bigger rigs, but if it gets you there and puts you on fish, it can't be all that bad. I would be a little worried though with that boat, say fishing white bear, when the wind picks up that the waves might be splashing on the casting deck.

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I have a 17.5 stratos bass boat and love it. I would agree that the max of 75hp seems underpowered unless they have come up with a way to make glass boats lighter. My boat is a 1995 with a 90 hp on it and it is underpowered. I have to ease into the gas to get it up on plane. The boat tops out at 32mph. The main thing I don't like about the boat being underpowered is the fact that when I have people and there gear in the boat its really takes some time getting up on plane.

The max hp for my boat is a 150.

As far a TM I would go with the cable drive. I have a 74lb on mine, people have told me that it is overkill, but I love it, especially on windy days.

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White Bear Lake? Where's that? smile I am SO used to my Titanic and it's steady pace of 19MPH... and even on WBL I have no problems with patience etc... so 30+ would be amazing to me.

I have no idea why a 1995 Stratos could handle 150HP and a 2008 Stratos is only rated up to 75HP. Weird. Doesn't make sense.. but that's what the specs say. Maybe it's much lighter now days?

Anyone here that can give any feedback to a Yamaha 2 stroke oil injected motor? That's the ONLY motor you can get on the Stratos... either a 50hp or 70hp. Dang.. I would really like a 4 stroke.. but you can't.. unless you simply sell the Yamaha and buy a 4 stroke.. of course thats going to cost a lot more.

One reason I am fixated on this boat is my towing vehicle.. this is the lighest fiberglass bass boat available today... I drive a 6 cylinder rear wheeled drive Firebird with a 2000LB class A hitch.. and the boat is less than 2000Lbs fully loaded... I actually went to Cabela's to day and put the boat on and drove around and it was actually really good! I think it can be towed just fine with my car... for a couple years... and just local lakes.. we do have a van for trips etc..

I can NOT afford a new car... so it's either a car OR a boat. Not both. So as far as I can see this is the best thing in my current world.

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I looked at those too, I'd at least look at the Triton Explorer before you buy. Next to each other the quality is very apparent.

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