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ironman

run dry?

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Just bought my newest outboard to date. 1996 Evinrude 15HP. I got to run it yesterday and it absolutely purrs!! One pull start first time and everytime as we motored about and fished a few different spots. It idles down perfectly. So here's the question: How do I keep it like this for a long, long time? At the landing when we are done fishing should I let it run out of gas? I've heard this before but I'd rather it come from a reliable source. Also any general tips for keeping it going strong. I'll be duck hunting out of this this fall so it's going to see alot of time on the water and is gowing to have to work pretty hard at times. Thanks.

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I would recommend running Sta-Bil or Seafoam in the gas all the time and leave the gas in the carbs (don't run it dry).

As far as making it last, keep up with the fresh treated gas, use a quality oil, change your impellar every 3 years, and your gear lube every year.

Do not run into rocks with it grin

That thing should last a lifetime if treated well.

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x2 on using Stabil in the gas whenever you fill up the gas tank. In the fall change the lower unit oil, hit all of the grease zerks with grease, and fog the engine whenever you let the engine sit for more than a month (prevents corrosion). Periodically you may want to use carbon guard or run a heavy dose of Seafoam through it to clean.

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Stabil keeps the gas from breaking down and essentially varnishing the carburetor.

I would put another plug in for running Seafoam in the gas. I run Seafoam through everything I own with an internal combustion engine from time to time(lawnmower, auger, outboards, truck, car, auger, chainsaw.)

It may not be a bad idea to run the carbs dry if you won't be using the motor for a long period of time(like storing it over the winter).

The simple maintenance has already been mentioned but I will say it again. Lower unit lube changes and grease zerks. If it doesn't have a decent stream of water running out of it change the impeller.

Check behind the prop from time to time to make sure there isn't fishing line wrapped around the shaft. That will eat up your lower unit seal and cause problems. If at the time you are changing your lower unit lube, you notice water mixed in you may need to change that seal or possibly your water pump gasket.

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Excellent advise above. I also remind you that using your outboard often is beneficial to it's own performance. Most outboards have problems because are used a little then left alone for a long time. Seals dry, carbs gum up, pump impellers dry up, etc.

As DTRO said, keep it in tip top shape and will last forever.

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I have the same motor on a 14 foot boat. I love it. Starts and runs good. I never run it dry. For winter storage I drain the lower unit fluid and replace it, fog the motor and I'm good to go till Open water again.

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A two stroke should never be run dry without using a fogging oil. When the gas is gone the fumes will race the engine when lean and you run the risk of piston and cylinder damage. Also on the lower unit do the oil change in the fall. Some wait till spring. If water gets in there and freezes over the winter it will trash the lower unit.

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Hopefully you add fuel stabilizer too...

marine_man

Yep I forgot to mention that. I do use fuel stabilizer. Good catch.

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