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Catmendo

A "Profusion" of yellows...

11 posts in this topic

I'm not a botanist, I don't want to know every species of plants & flowers. However, I do appreciate what plants, flowers, trees and shrubs represent...LIFE!

Right now my local landscape is covered in bloom from countless species of flowering plants. I happened upon these yesterday afternoon while on route to the ranch. Like I said, I can't identify many plant species, but I do enjoy them for what they are.

In this particular case, the area that I stopped to photograph was massive "PROFUSION" of yellows as seen in these results.

284_8426-1.jpg

Some of these flowers had a strong hint of yellow/orange color.

283_8355-1.jpg

Some were just amazingly beautiful to gaze at.

283_8370-1.jpg

Some of these little yellow gems shared their space with the Wild Rose. Can any of you identify the little green wasp depicted here on the right hand side of the frame? It's brillant iredescent green coloration is amazing!

284_8418-1.jpg

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Those are gorgeous shots, Stu! I have no idea what they are, but they sure are beautiful. I like the second one the best.

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Very nice, beautiful colors!

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Very nice Stu!...love the profusion of the yellows!....I'm pretty sure they are "trefoils" of some type.....we have similar species here in Minnesota...."bird's foot trefoil"....our fields,openings, and roadsides are full of them at this time....

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Love 'em all Stu. The 2nd and last do stand out a little more to me though.

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Quote:
Can any of you identify the little green wasp depicted here on the right hand side of the frame?

Sure, don't ask the bee guy confused... I do believe that would be a sweat bee (Hymenoptera: Halictidae Augochlora sp.) wink.

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Quote:
Can any of you identify the little green wasp depicted here on the right hand side of the frame?

Sure, don't ask the bee guy confused... I do believe that would be a sweat bee (Hymenoptera: Halictidae Augochlora sp.) wink.

Ok, so I didn't want to feel guilty about distracting you from your daily rigors of getting your finger's all sticky...SORRY, next time I'll ask,! grin

I thank all of you for your kind comments as well. smile

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Hmmm... rigors tired ... rigor mortis, perhaps wink !!!

If you really wanna' have some "fun", wait 'till tomorrow when it's 30-odd degrees out and sit in the Sub for a while with the windows up and the air off, then strip naked and then go traipsing through that patch. You'll attract more of those little green friends than you ever wanted to see for willing photo subjects eek... they're attracted to sweat as their name would indicate. You might just scare the heck out of Diana and anyone else in the immediate vicinity, mind you shocked!!!

Beauty pics, though... on your property???

sweat-bee2.jpg

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I thinks I'll pass on your suggestion! smile

As for the location, along the service road that runs adjacent to #4 & Father Turney Rd. You pass it everyday to and from the Bee's Nest! grin

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Very pretty stuff, Stu. Love those warm summer tones in the flowers!

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Very nice Stu!...love the profusion of the yellows!....I'm pretty sure they are "trefoils" of some type.....we have similar species here in Minnesota...."bird's foot trefoil"....our fields,openings, and roadsides are full of them at this time....

Johnny, you hit it bang-on, they are definately Birdfoot Trefoil. I just picked up a copy of Peterson Field Guide on Wildflowers!

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