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tmvikings

My Two Cents

14 posts in this topic

I’ve been out fishing now a lot and have done really well with the eyes for the month of June, but one thing I am really starting to get upset about is the water quality of the metro lakes. I am sure with all the money we give the < MN DNR> that something is in the works and sure it would take a little time to get these lakes to a decent water quality level and some lakes are sure to be better and or worse than others. The other day me and my brother went to a favorite lake and caught the first fish of the day, and I had it right to the boat with no less than a foot to 6 inch’s before you could even tell it was a walleye. Would be nice to start an effective program with reachable / attainable goals to get the water to certain standards not this oh well attitude, it is what it is stuff. And this go’s to everyone out their- last year ice fishing out on Prior lake I was so disgusted by people just throwing trash everywhere-( It starts with us sportsman!)

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Look towards lakeshore owners that trim right down to the water mark, with all the rain we have had the runoff this year has been huge, with no bufferzone to clean up that muddy water running in (from natural bullrushes, and grasses on shore) the lakes are going to be dirty.

The DNR and state of MN have laws against how much lakeshore you can clean up, but it is not often followed, with less enforcement officers out there its getting harder and harder to enfoce anything. What amazes me is we are like the 5th most taxed state but we can't find the $$ we need to have a properly run DNR. Now they have a dedicated funding bill being voted on for the DNR but they had to include the liberal arts in the bill. Funny how the DNR and are Natural Resouces continually get hosed by the legislator!

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You could always intorduce zebra mussles, they help clean up the water....

Until all of us sportsman stand together and DEMAND our money be invested where its spent, we will continue to get hosed.

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Other things that contribute are the stuff left on the lakes by ice fisher-people. We have discussed on different forums how much is collected by the good people, but how much is missed by them. We track things onto the ice with our vehicles, much of it unintentionally, but none the less it all adds up. Just look at out ditches, and see how much debris is in there. This filters to our lakes when there is high water.

We have come a long way since the 60's and 70's, but we have a long long way to go.

Everytime a new sideway or road is added to an area, it makes for more runoff, and no way to absorb the chemicals.

We all want nice boat ramps and parking areas, but this also adds chemicals to the lakes and cuts down on the buffer zone.

Watch those shore fishing, and they remove the weeds to get closer to the lake and not mess up their lines. Even some of the parks at the lakes do not leave a buffer zone, they mow right up to the lake's edge.

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The biggest problem is lakeshore owners,I'm one and have asked,suggested to the DNR and my reps.to create a manditory shore buffer 20-30 ft.To stop all the chemicals,Fertilizers from running unobstructed into the lakes.think about all the asphalt,concrete,roof areas that dont absorbe any water! It freely flows with all chemicals right to the lakes. 80% of all lake polution is caused by unobstructed runoff!!

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Not all lakes are clear. Some water is dirtyer than others. Run off, Muddy water, Carp, bottom composition, plat life, these are all factors.

Like it or not, man is not bigger than nature.

The wind blows hard for a few days and the clearest watter can clowd up for a long time. Look at LOW a few years back. One week of big wind and that lake was like coffie for 6 months.

If you want to fish clear water, do your resurch and fish clear water lakes. Visability is listed on the dnr websites, they are all there, all different.

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I do think the DNR should get more strict on what lakeshore owners can do to the shore. Although that will never fly, as lakeshore owners tend to be a good proportion of the property tax base in certain communities.

Minneapolis is on a roll, with the changes they have made to Nokomis and their other city lakes to leave more shoreline vegetation. People complain to the city though because it looks 'crappy'.

We need to do our part to help educate people on the benefits of undeveloped shoreline.

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i think the counties should start looking at offering property tax breaks to lakeshore owners who buffer their shores.

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want to see bad water? Check out some lakes and rivers in ND. Green algae that coats everything that touches the water. A lot of this is from farm run off. So it is a bigger problem than just lake shore owners.

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This seems like an odd topic. Almost every lake I have been on this year is clearer than other years.

Waconia.

Auburn.

Wasserman.

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Quote:
I am sure with all the money we give the < MN DNR> that something is in the works and sure it would take a little time to get these lakes to a decent water quality level and some lakes are sure to be better and or worse than others.

I think you summed it up in two parts of your comment. First is in the quote above and then in your final statement. Personally, I think it is an "us" problem and not a DNR problem. Why should our tax dollars have to be spent and yes wasted by using our DNR to develope programs to clean up our mess? I believe they try to do what is right but there is a limit to what they can do. We hire them to promote quality resources through management not clean up after us don't we? Your final statement says it all, "It starts with us...." and it starts with more than just us sportsmen.

Bob

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Ou family place in on Thunder, one of the clearest lakes in the state. The water table is also very high on the property. Due to this, in 12 years no fertilizer or weed killer has gone on the lawn. It looks like a dandelion farm in the spring. Golf course lawns are for.....Golf courses. I hate to think about the run off issues from these.

I think the same regs that apply to no phosphorous in lawn fertilizer should apply to the whole state instead of just the metro.

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This seems like an odd topic. Almost every lake I have been on this year is clearer than other years.

Waconia.

Auburn.

Wasserman.

I have noticed this as well. Wondered if it had to do with the cooler spring....

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Quote:
I am sure with all the money we give the < MN DNR> that something is in the works and sure it would take a little time to get these lakes to a decent water quality level and some lakes are sure to be better and or worse than others.

I think you summed it up in two parts of your comment. First is in the quote above and then in your final statement. Personally, I think it is an "us" problem and not a DNR problem. Why should our tax dollars have to be spent and yes wasted by using our DNR to develope programs to clean up our mess? I believe they try to do what is right but there is a limit to what they can do. We hire them to promote quality resources through management not clean up after us don't we? Your final statement says it all, "It starts with us...." and it starts with more than just us sportsmen.

Bob

Maybe what we need (along with the Walleye Stamp Conversation) is to have a "Clear Water" Stamp. Why not pay more fees??? mad

Kidding asside. I think the shore owners should have a buffer. I think it looks nicer with the tall grass and just a trail to the water. If I was to move out of the city, I would want as natural looking as you can get. Isn't that the point?

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