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Jeremy airjer W

Sebring evap core replacemant

9 posts in this topic

Chrysler evap cores are always fun! This was the first one I have done on a Sebring. It took me about 8 hrs to complete. Just thought you might like to see how these are done?

This is what I need to replace, the A/C Evaporator Core.

sebevap.jpg

Step one remove the intake plenum.

sebintake.jpg

To get at the heater hoses. There are two, only the top one is visible.

sebhoses.jpg

This is the dash as it looks normally

sebstart.jpg

The dash with the a pillar trim, forward dash trim panel, Side panels, radio, HVAC control head, center counsel, glove box, knee panel, floor ducts, electrical connectors, and steering wheel removed.

sebdashapart.jpg

The dash rotated back and resting on the front seats.

sebdashout.jpg

Finally the HVAC assembly is accessible!

sebhvacin.jpg

A dozen screws to replace the evap core in the assembly and then reinstall.

sebhvac.jpg

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I'd scrap the ac and roll down the windows.

Top would be down all the time if it were mine grin

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These are a major pain and the same time, a good money maker. The first one always has a learning curve (I thought they paided around 6.0-6.5, but this could have been warr. time or I could be way off). How much did it pay Jer?

Down at RCP, we had a little guy who did these day in and day out (warr. and customer pay). It became gravy to him. He had it down to about 2.5 to 3.0 hours by the time he was hooking up the A/C Machine.

Great post Airjer smile.

If anyone tries this, let us know how it goes.

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Book time is 4.6 hours. It took me about an hour to find one hidden bolt that secured the assembly to the dash frame.

The final bill was around $1,400. It sure blew cold when I was done!!! grin

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I swear back when I used to book these jobs out, they used to pay much more. When the learning curve is figured out, even none factory guides drop time I have found.

Good you took these images. You can use them for ref. next time. Just a basic run threw I think would jog the mind.

If I remember, the secrete trick/tool was on of those 6"-7" Phillips screw drive tips and a cordless drill grin. It may have been used for that screw that gave you trouble.

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I have that phillips bit in my blue point cordless!! The hidden bolt was behind the air duct cowling that provided flow to the center ducts. It was impossible to see with the duct in place. No mention of that in the useless directions. There where three bolts that held the cowling in place and then access to the 10mm head bolt was possible.

As far as tools anybody could do it. A stubby phillips, regular sized phillips or cordless screwdriver, A 1/4" ratchet, 10 mm deep socket, 8mm deep socket, A 3/8" ratchet, 12mm shallow swivel, 12 mm regular socket, 13mm regular socket, two disconnect tools for the a/c lines (the only thind the average guy would not have but are inexpensive and available at better parts/tool stores), a pair of pliers, a 16mm wrench, a 19mm wrench, and a 3/8" torque wrench was all that was needed

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boy do i love working on the chryslers. had the pleasure to work on a 300m last week to do a ps pump for a few dollars more they could allow an extra 2 inches to get the mounting bolts out instead increase the time to remove the fan assembly. gotta admit wonder what goes thru the big wig engineers of some vehichles. LOL

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Wow.

I'd scrap the ac and roll down the windows.

I'd scrap more than the a/c............

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