Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
evinrude19

what to use???

19 posts in this topic

what would you use when your fishing in the tall reeds things i forgot what there called but i think they are reeds that come about like a couple feet out of the water. i tend to use a Texas rigged senko with the weight but i haven't had much success with it and i was just wondering what everyone else uses.

thanks

zach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That should work. I always used a texas rigged lizard, creature bait, tube bait, jig/trailler or sometimes a weightless senko. However, I usually found my best bullrush edge patterns developed in mid July or later on most lakes I fished in Central MN.

Hope it helps, jjz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depending on how thick they are you might be able to get a swimming jig, spinnerbait or other lures threw them. I agree I also like to texas rig when fishing reeds. Sometimes ill use a bigger weight just to cover some water and get a reaction strike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

in low light i like to snake a buzzbait thru the reeds. texas rigged plastics and spinnerbaits are good choices too. or a weedless spoon or a weedless frog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fish a jig or a weedless spoon. I do not fish a texas rig all that often for a very specific reason (based on my experiences). Bass seem to be willing to gut a jig or a spoon allowing for hookups further back in the mouth. Texas rigs have a nasty habit of sliding forward and exposing the hook point through the soft part of a bass's mouth. This puts you in jeapordy of hanging the fish on a bullrush or reed and 9 times out of 10 allowing the fish to unhook itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and the other question i have is do you make long casts with a texas riged lure or do you pitch them around you? cause it seems like when i do make a longer cast i seem to get more fish cause its farther away from the boat

thanks

zach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hiya -

Once rushes get more than a foot or so high they get tough to fish through when they're thick, unless you're poking around at the edges. If I'm right in them I'm with Ray - jigs or weedless spoons like a Jawbreaker, although spinnerbaits and buzzbaits work at times too, as do swimming jigs. Texas-rigged baits get to be a pain because they get pulled down on the hook going through the rushes, even if you peg the sinker. If I do T-rig, it's almost always with a Northland Jungle-Lock jig rather than a hook and slip sinker.

Most of my casts in rushes are pretty short, especially if they're thick. The farther you cast, the more likely your line is draped over the stalks and your bait ends up being out of the water more than it's in the water. I bet most of my casts in rushes are 30-40 feet. For soft plastics, I'm almost always pitching to thicker clumps or pockets. When I fish rushes I usually have two rods up on the deck with me - a spoon or jig rod to fancast with, and a soft plastic I pick up and pitch at specific targets.

A couple other thoughts on fishing rushes:

- if you can, fish either with the wind or against the wind. It lines up the stalks so you can avoid running the line over them. Fish rushes in a cross-wind is an exercise in frustration most of the time.

- make your casts as low trajectory as you can. My casts are sort of this underhanded roll cast that all my fishing partners make fun of, but it's accurate as heck out to 40 feet, and keeps the line from draping over the stalks.

I love fishing rushes...

Cheers,

Rob Kimm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love fishing rushes as well. I've had my most success pitching a black/blue jig n pig. Sometimes I try to pitch the bait deep into the thick of it and shake the jig until it falls down to the bottom. I would suggest using some pretty heavy line. I typically use 50lbs Power Pro. That stuff will cut a reed in half.

Carl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

of course, something to think about is not depleting the rush bed, which can be very bad longterm. I've seen entire beds get ripped out by getting hammered by musky fishermen before. Just something to have in the back of your mind smile

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weaving a buzz bait or a swim jig can produce, so can plastic jerk-baits, or pitching to open spots with a jig-n-trailer.

The sky is the limit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess it all depends on how thick they are but I can personally say that all of my best bass in the 20 up to the 22.25 inch mark have come out of areas with thick reeds. I try to flip a 7 inch t-rigged worm with a 1/16 oz bullet sinker right up just barely into or next to the reeds and let it sit for a couple seconds. Usually you'll see the line twitch, then crank down and eliminate slack. Last year alone I boated 5 fish in the 20 inch class by flippin reeds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm using a technique that works great for me in a shallow water situation where there is a weed bottom and or taller weeds such as reeds, pads, etc.....I simply rig a short 6 to 18 inch drop shot with a 1/16 or 1/8th ounce weight on the bottom.....It limits hangups and really only keeps your bait 6 inches or so off the bottom due to the line angle.....Best of all it catches bass, both small and largemouths..... Whadda Ya think?.......JPS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cast a weedless berkley Blade dancer up thrue it. Start your retrieve running on top of the water and once you it the oter edge of the weed line, let er drop a few seconds. nine time out of ten they will whack it then. its also an awsome tactic for norther pike. its pretty cool to watch em hit in the middle of the thick stuff!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FInd the absolute thickest reeds you can and toss a senko right up to the edge of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weightless Senko or weightless Fluke (or w/ a little weight) texas rigged

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great tip about the dropshotting! It's something that a lot of bass anglers have yet to try but once they do they see the versatility in a HUGE variety of situations. Thick cover is a great one for this. The Minnetonka guys know this from doing it in milfoil (and if they don't they should!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • I apologize if that came out wrong. The idea might very well be the best route to go. It's just that over the past 25 years or so I have seen many attempts to save a dollar that cost a buck and a half to do lol.    Here are my two cents. If you have a slab and you want to pour on top of it while keeping the same footprint that sounds pretty doable and could probably save some money if you don't have to change drain lines, run water, heat runs, electrical etc into the slab.   If you intend to tie into the existing slab and run zones of pex across the joint and have the new and old floors end up at the same elevation it still can be done. Some contractors will not want to mess with tying into and raising the elevation of the slabs and will prefer to start from scratch especially if you as the homeowner want them to warranty the finished product.  The critical thing would be to use enough rebar drilled into the old slab and have enough compaction and sufficient footings to make sure the slabs stay where they are without settling. That would make all kinds of problems with the pex.    Hopefully that response came across better.
    • It'll be interesting to see if the team plays a little harder in front of a different goalie. 
    • Hawg, I'm with you on this one !
    • Check and see if you have a video output on you device. You may be able to record to a digital device.
    • Just use plain old spray paint in a can. I've done it many many times and seems to stick really nice. Nothing special either I can't even tell you the brand because I have no clue. But as mentioned doing 2-3 light coats helps.
    • no expert here, but heat doesn't rise. heat radiates in the direction of least resistance (R value). warm air or water rises because it is less dense than colder air or water.  If you don't insulate you will be heating the ground under your cabin and the earth is a very large heat sink $$$. get some info from an expert in the radiant field as far as tube diameter, spacing, water temp, manifolds, length of runs, and so on. it varies on amount of windows (solar) ceiling height and room type (bed, bath, living area,  storage etc.). once you pour over the tubing you get to live with it. I did my own Home 15 years ago and got some good advise (wish I would have taken it all)
    • Sonar works from above, cameras need to be submerged. What am I missing here?
    • I've also had good luck spray painting PVC.  Biggest thing I found is to do lots of light coats, the PVC makes the paint want to run in a hurry.
    • I believe you can do this with the Lowrance HDS 9 and above.
    • I'll go with another loss in overtime.
  • Our Sponsors