Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Roscoe

Gar

17 posts in this topic

Anyone ever catch any gar around the metro? I know that they live in the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers. I have never caught one, but have seen a couple dead ones on shore in winter by a lake near my house down in the woods. If anyone has tips or pictures be sure to post them. They're an ugly fish, but definately unique. I read that they are difficult to hook because of their bony mouth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You get around the hook-setting issue by using a rope lure. Their teeth get tangled up in the rope. It works. Do a search for it... you'll find a lot of info.

As for getting into gar around the metro, I don't know. I've heard the St. Croix can be good, and I know they're in the Minnesota (and therefore the Mississippi). Hopefully someone else will have some input, since I'd like to tangle with a few of them toothy buggers too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Husker's right, rope lures are the way to go. They're pretty easy to make. I know the cat guys see gar trying to get out of the current at night and swimming near the top of the water on the backside of their boats when they are anchored. Might be worth a try.

Otherwise try looking for lakes connected to the Minnesota or Mississippi. They like to stay near the water's surface and sun themselves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know the cat guys see gar trying to get out of the current at night and swimming near the top of the water on the backside of their boats when they are anchored. Might be worth a try.

Gar = Bait = Catfish swimming nearby. smile

I must have had 7 or 8 different gar swimming around the boat last Friday. All of them Shortnose approximately 2' in length. They like to hover just below the surface of the water and snap at the minnows swimming by them. Right after sundown would be dynamite gar time IMO.

They are pretty awesome fish!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have two species of Gar here in MN, the longnose and shortnose. The Minnesota river is chock full of shortnose gar, just spend some time around slack water areas and you will see them surfacing. With the high water, up inside flooded creek mouths is where you will find them. Any connected backwaters as well. Rope lures do not work well for shortnose, so use small shiners fished under a float(6"-3') with a very sharp, small hook like a size 6 or 8 octopus. Let the fish take the bait for a while too, even shortnose are very hard to hook.

Longnose gar are not as common in our area, although good numbers exist in the Mississipi backwaters below Red Wing and the extreme lower St. Croix. I target them after dark on sand flats, using suckers or shiners for bait. Botom fish with long leaders or fish a float, whatever conditions warrant. Longnose come into the shallows at night to feed. During the day, they pod up and hover in certain areas and if you have a boat you can search the backwaters for them and if you can see them, chuck a rope lure at them. The hottest days of Summer are best for Gar.

Gar are awesome fish, especially the big Longnose pushing 5 feet. My personal best was a 45"er I got from the Croix last year, and I will be back for a 50 this Summer. Good luck!

~Roughfisher at Large longnosegarcloseup.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was out on the Croix 2 weeks ago and they were hords of them in 2' and less of water. Smaller 2-2.5' males and mongo females 40-50". All longnose. They were getting ready to spawn as males were grouping and swimming side by side with the larger fat females. I have fished for gars in yrs past and still have a few rope lures in my tackle so just for the fun of it I tie one on, tangled and landed a 46".

This surprised me a bit, last week when fishing bald eagle, i saw a shortnose gar, about 2' in length. It probably has a very low population or someone released one in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice! A 46 is a very nice Longnose for these parts. Way to go! And Bald Eagle, I have seen the shortnose come up in DNR surveys there and never believed it.....but I guess it's true and it makes you wonder how they got there. There isn't a lake or river even close to there that has gar.

~Roughfisher at Large

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We saw a few swimming around the boat last night in the MN. Wacthed them snap at the minnows on the surface.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they are very hard to catch, although i have managed to catch a couple of them. they are mean ill tell you that much!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Typical MN River Shortnose Gar

062108joelfunwithgarjb5.jpg

I still think these fish are pretty darn cool. I happened to be beached along a shoreline the other day and I was scanning the water for gar and baitfish when I saw something that really caught my eye. I netted it with my baitnet and low and behold, it was a baby gar, approximately 4" long. I let it go but that would have been a cool fish to keep in an aquarium for awhile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I caught a couple of shortnose gar in the Mississippi last summer one of them was descent sized, 33-34 in. They are very hard to catch. We caught them on creek chubs. I was using a size 2 hook with a small stinger hook through the tail. The stinger hook was the only reason I caught the gar, but i let them run for probably 20-30 feet and then set the hook. They are very hard to catch, and do a number on your bait. Like walleyeslayer said they are mean little buggers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they steal my bait all the time mad. and sometimes when you set the hook it doesnt pennitrate their nose because its relly hard. Most of the time they will just chomp down and once you get to shore they will open their mouth and spit it... fun to catch if you get them though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Another disaster. I tried making relatively safe picks, and bombed. I have gone from the top 60 after two events all the way down to just over the 90th percentile. I need to just go with my gut
    • that is what we were thinking too.
    • Live link.   http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/features/webcams/falconcam/index.html      


    • BEFORE BEGINNING

      Before you begin, make sure you have a good strong battery and make sure it's charged up. If you have a bad or weak battery, you may want to replace it because if it doesn't crank good and strong, you are likely to get a low, inaccurate reading. Make sure your engine is warmed up to operating temperature(if possible). About 10 minutes of riding should do.

      First, take out the spark plug and thread in the adapter for the compression tester. Make sure you have the correct size adapter for your particular ATV. Slide your kill switch to the "off" position. Some ATVs won't crank over with the kill switch in the "off" position, so if yours is like this, then you will need to either unhook your ignition coil or ground the end of the spark plug wire to a good ground. You can use a jumper wire with alligator clips on each end to ground it. Next, make sure the throttle is in the wide open position. You can either hold the throttle lever with your thumb or you may be able to tape it or use a zip tie to fasten it to your handlebars to hold it in the wide open position. If you don't have the throttle in the wide open position, you will probably get too low of a reading. Also, if you are testing a newly rebuilt engine, the engine needs to have been run for, at least, 30 or 40 minutes or you will probably get too low of a reading.

      NOTE: Before you begin with the actual test, make sure the threaded adapter is screwed in good and isn't leaking any air out around it.

      ACTUAL TESTING

      With the throttle in the wide open position, push the start button and crank the engine over until the hand on the gauge stops moving. Each time the engine turns over the hand should raise a little more until it reaches the maximum compression of the engine. When it stops, that is your compression reading. This usually takes no more than 10 seconds. Try to avoid cranking an engine for more than 10 seconds at a time as this is hard on the starter and the battery. Now, push the relief valve on your compression gauge and that will reset the hand back to zero. It's a good ideal to repeat the test a couple or three times to make sure you get an accurate reading. On kick start models, it will be the same procedure, but obviously you will be kicking it over instead of using a start button. Worn piston rings and cylinder walls will increase the number of strokes it takes to reach the maximum reading. If you're kicking, it could possibly take as many as 10-20 kicks to get the highest reading.

      THE READING

      You will need to check your repair manual for your particular model for the correct compression specifications. See note below. Usually, an engine will run OK if it has at least 100 PSI of compression. Most engines will have somewhere between 100-250 and some as high as 300 PSI, depending on the engine. Sometimes they will run with under 100 PSI, but usually not very well. If you get a low reading, you can do a "wet test" to try to help determine the problem.

      If your reading is too high, then you probably have carbon built up on your piston and combustion chamber.

      NOTE: You may get a low reading on some engines because some engines have a decompressor assembly built into the camshaft. Check the service manual for your quad to see whether or not your quad has a decompressor assembly built into the cam.

      WET TEST

      If you got a low reading, pour about 1-2 teaspoons of clean motor oil down into the cylinder through the spark plug hole and do the compression test again. If your reading increases, then your rings or cylinder walls are probably worn. If your reading doesn't increase, then it's probably your valves. You could have a bent valve, you may have leaky valve seats, or your valve clearance may not be adjusted properly. Also, low compression can be caused by a blown head gasket.

      CAUSES OF LOW COMPRESSION

      *Worn piston rings or worn or damaged cylinder walls
      *Leaking valves
      *Valve clearance not properly set
      *Blown head gasket

      CAUSE OF HIGH COMPRESSION (stock engines)

      *Carbon buildup in combustion chamber and on piston

      NOTE: Compression testing is a good way to keep track or "gauge" the wear in your engine. When you first get your ATV or when you rebuild the engine in your ATV, you can do a compression test and then later on, you can do them periodically. This will help you determine the wear in your engine each time you do a compression test and will guide you in knowing when your engine needs rebuilding.

      This is about all I can think of. I hope I didn't leave anything out and I hope this helps everyone with their compression tests.
    • As dumb as this sounds how is this done?
    • Try a compression check. And make sure the choke is opening all the way.
    • They are not the best out their but for the price and your average person not too bad I guess, Its going to send lead to where its pointed. This is probably what is going to happen he is going to buy a package shoot it for awhile then start upgrading everything to how he wants it and it is going to end up costing way more than if he just built one himself how he wants it.  
    • Hello, well I convinced my brother in-law to pick up my buddies old 1980 185 although pretty sure he said it was bored out to a 200? Here is the deal it's been sitting for a solid 8 years. I know it ran fine before. Not the delema-----   It starts right up (he bought a new carb odd amazon) although it sounds like a jet with high rpms. Looked at the throttle cable that's fine. Floats are fine. So he plugged this hole in the air filter and got it to idle down although when he hit the gas wouldn't get any power. Read a few things online and they tell you to just bypass the filter box and all that so back to amazon we went to get one of those filters that mount right up to the carb and it's still the same issue..   I just haven't seen anything like this? Do you guys have any thoughts or tricks that we/he could try?! Thanks in advance
    • Hi Everyone,  I'm looking into buying my first true fish finder and I'm a little perplex with the mapping card situation.  I'm looking at Humminbird Helix 5's and 7's.  I'm drawn to the autochart feature.  From my understanding, you can record 8 hours of charting onto the internal storage, but, is there any native mapping included on the unit or do I absolutely have to get some sort of mapping chip, zerolines or lake master, or navionics?  Can I store data on a blank SD card?  I've been researching this a lot and haven't found any conclusive answers. Thanks everyone!
  • Our Sponsors