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davesfriend

Quick gas question.

17 posts in this topic

I tried to search for this topic, found nothing similar. I have a 2001 Merc 125 2+2 2 stroke and a 2005 Merc. 9.9 4 stroke. My question is this. Since gas stations in my area stopped serving non-oxy premium gas, will both motors be fine with 10% etho gas premium? I belive the 2 stroke has a carb but I am not sure. Any advice would be great. Thank you..

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Run stabil or seafoam in it and you should be fine.

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Seafoam's primary ingredient is isopropanol alcohol. So by adding it, you are raising the effective alcohol % higher than the 10% that's in it when it comes out of the pump. Stabil or 2+2 or whatever the quiksilver stuff is what you should use, not seafoam.

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The Seafoam can says "A 100% pure petroleum product". No mention of alchohol. On Paul Brandt's radio show he always mentions something called stodart(sp?) solvent as the main ingrediant.

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Would try to find a station that sells non oxy fuel. There has to be one with in a reasonable driving distance. Check with a local small engine shop or coop they'll know where the closest one is to you. 2 saw shops I've dealt with in the past say a huge percentage of their buisness is because of the problems of corn fuel. Long term it will be well worth it to run only non oxy fuel in it. Talk to any shop parts guys or mechanics about the effects of bad gas. Since I started useing only the non oxy fuel in all the small engines 4 or 5 years back at the recomendation of 3 different small engine shop mechanics/parts guys the problems with everything has gone way down to almost no problems with fuel related issues. Sure does bring the stress level down not having to fight the fuel problems and is better than having to worry about all the additives.

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Isopropanol alchohol is a petroleum product. It is made from hydrating propylene, which is a byproduct from refining gasoline.

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Also just checked Seafoam MSDS - it is 20% alcohol, the other ingredients are naptha and pale oil, all three petroleum byproducts.

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Seafoam has three ingredients, a naptha based solvent, isopropynal, and pale oil.

If you talk to the guys at Seafoam the are adamant about stressing the difference between isopropynal and isopropyl!

Although Paul Bran is right most of the time he is often off base a little. A classic example is everytime he mentions that older gm's will not allow the electric fuel pump to run if there is no oil pressure. Thats exactly backwards to how the system actually works. I chuckle every time he brings it up!! I can only hope someday to have my very one radio car talk show and set the record straight once and for all! LOL grin

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If it takes you more than 2 weeks to run through a tank of gas on your boat add Stabil (or whatever). I like to put Seafoam in once and awhile (fall and spring) but generally use Seafoam to fix problems (like clear out my kicker) by using a fairly heavy dose in a small external tank. Adding a can of Seafoam will add very little alcohol to your system (<<1%). As for the non-oxy gas, I prefer it but don't worry about it as long as I use Stabil when I add the gas.

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Isopropanol and Isopropyl are two different names for the same chemical. Just verified that with the chemists here at work. Do the research if needed, but here are the common use names for Isopropanol:

Names

CAS No. 67-63-0

Propyl alcohol

1-Methylethyl alcohol

Isopropyl alcohol

2-Propyl alcohol

1-Methylethanol

Isopropanol

Propan-2-ol

2-Hydroxypropan

2-Propanol

Dimethyl carbinol

2-Hydroxypropane

IPA

I'm guessing the sales guys at seafoam are telling you what best serves their purpose (imagine that!)

Anyway Seafoam works excellent as a solvent, but not as a stabilizer, even though they claim it does. DinkADunk is right - it is a spot treatment that shouldn't be left in your fuel system, it should be used and burned out and fresh gas should be then run before you let your system sit for any period of time. Stabil or similar should be used for long term use.

A friend of my dad's owned a car dealership when I was growing up. His best mechanics, and these guys worked on all kinds of stuff, HATED seafoam in anything but a short term, clean out the carburetor type application. The problems it causes fuel systems when used improperly (as a stabilizer) far outweigh the benefits. Although, I don't really know why I'm getting into this argument as I'm sure the "seafoam is the best thing since sliced bread" crowd will come out of the woodwork with examples of how they've used it for 30 years with no problems.

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Thanks all - some excellent clarifications in this thread.

A comment not made, but edged around. Today's gasolines start to deteriorate - loose octane and start breaking down into varnishes in as little as 6 weeks. If you are not using a tank within a month you should be using a stabilizer.

I agree with a couple of these that Seafoam is not a top performer as a stabilizer (though a lot of people use it for that purpose). Stabil is probably one of the better commonly available ones. AMSOIL also has one, that provides up to 18 months gasoline storage protection - I use it all the time in the can that I fuel my 8 various small engines from. Some sit for over 6 months between being started and always start on the 1st or 2nd pull.

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I used to use regular or plus with my '84 Evinrude 90. I had some moisture problems though with the ethanol and switched over to non-oxy premium. No more problems. And this spring the motor fired right up instead of taking 5-10 minutes before running right.

I use a little seafoam in every tank of gas. Cheap insurance to make sure those carbs stay clean. I still use Stabil for winter storage.

I would still see if you can find the non-oxygenated fuel. There was a HSOforum somewhere that listed current station locations.

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MN hot rod association keeps a pretty up to date list of non oxy fuel suppliers in mn.

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I checked out the site and there are some problems with it. The only place by me that has it isn't really by me. It is the oppisite direction of where I fish. I think from what I have read that it is worth going out of the way to get it. So. how much will it be for 30 gallons? That's another story.. Thank you guys for the usefull info. This is an awsome site. I can't tell you how many times this site has saved me houndreds of dollars.

So, the genral idea is NOT to run 10%eth. premium in my motors?

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Oh yah, and the 2 stations listed for ELK River no longer have non-oxy.. They said it is not available in MN. I don't believe them though.

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I wouldn't believe them either. The S.A. in Ramsey on Hwy 10 sells it. Also the BP gas station in Akeley where my boat is still sells it. I'm covered wherever the boat is.

I don't know that I'd drive more than 10 miles out of my way for it, but it is pretty cheap insurance to keep that motor running great.

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