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north red river

leaky boat!

9 posts in this topic

I recently bought a cheap 14 foot aluminum boat and water is seeping through the rivets a bit.....I thought about try some JB weld to fix. Anyone have a good cheap fix for this?

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My cousin had a similar problem and he used GOOP and this has lasted for a few years already and actually his whole seam was leaking

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Aquarium silicone, or GE Silicone II for Outdoor Use. Clean the area well first with rubbing alcohol, then put silicone around the rivet and work it in with your fingers. Do on both inside and outside of hull. This works surprisingly well.

JB weld works too but is more brittle so if it's in an area that flexes it can crack and leak again. Beauty of silicone is it doesn't harden, it just cures.

Oh also let it dry for at least 24 hours before you put your boat in the water.

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try using a spray in bed liner. it will seal it and make it skid proof.it also helps quiet the boat if you walk or drop something.

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The easiest and cheapest way, as long as you have access to both sides of the rivets, and if this is a cheap alum boat you should, is to tighten them up. Cost is $0 if you have a buddy with the air hammer and bit for it. Or go to northern and get a bit for use on an air hammer.

Then get a block of solid metal (I use a SS axle) to "back" the rivet. Hit loose rivets with about two "taps" of the hammer with the rivet tool in it, and you are now tight as a drum.

Others here may know the proper terminology, but if you go to northern and ask them how to tighten rivets, they will be able to show you the tools needed.

JB Weld or silicone etc. will work short term, and adding bedliner will add more weight than you think. Tightening rivets is easy and quick and the proper way to get a dry boat. Good luck.

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re-peening is the name of the procedure. You can also do the job with a hammer, but the air hammer is the way to go. Be careful not to overdo the hammering, you could squash the rivet too much where it loses it's strength. If the rivet is too messed up or worn, you can always drill it out and install a new one. Be sure to use either all stainless steel or all aluminum ones, a marina should carry what you might need.

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There is a good sealer after you set the rivets called Gluvet works very well it is about 35$ a quart.You should be able to find it at any Marina.

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If you have access to them I'd defintely re-peen them vs applying a sealer.

marine_man

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Problem with peening is that the neck of the rivet is already work-hardened from when it is installed and therefore can be brittle. Be careful not to overdo it because you can break the rivet and then you have to replace. Silicone is definitely a temporary fix, but its quick and cheap.

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