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boatfixer

2002 Chrysler Sebring

14 posts in this topic

Any thoughts on this one guys? 2.7 V-6 88,000 miles. Same thing, looking for a decent used car for the kid.

Thanks

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Do not buy it! I would not. Sorry for this edit!!!!!!!!!!!

I do not want to give people the wrong idea grin

Like I stated, I was having a brain blurbe

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Shack, do you remember if the 2.7s were the ones with the "engine sludge" issue?

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I have read that as well. Is there anyway to tell if this engine is prone to this.

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Shack, do you remember if the 2.7s were the ones with the "engine sludge" issue?

Right on Macgyver55!

On the way home from work, my brain started to flow again. I am sorry, I was working on a project at work and should have waited to get home, so I could think.

The 2.7l is one of the most problematic engines Chrysler has had out in years. The upper valve train (and lower end) is prone to major issues. 88,000 miles is the mark issues could start smirk.

Side note, call around and price out used eng.'s with the same amount of miles. They are like $2000.00-$3000.00 for a used motor, if you can find one. They blew up so much, the used market is drained and the junk yards know this. You can only imagine what a reman from Chrysler would be.

I am very sorry, but I would stay away from the 2.7L Chrysler. It is a real pooch!

Good luck!

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If I recall correctly Chrysler just released a TSB on a couple of engines including this one. The TSB refers to the use of oil additives which are no longer recommended for these motors due to the lubrication problems they are prone to!

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So stay away from these things then?

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If your looking for bigger sedans the Grand Prix with a 3.8, Toyota Camry, Hyundai Sonata, and the Ford Taurus would be better options.

If size doesn't matter how about a Saturn? I know everyone is tired of hearing me say it but they can be really good reliable vehicle. Not to mention you can find them in any price range, there relatively inexpensive to maintain and do it yourself friendly! I had the opportunity to take my 97 SL2 on a road trip to Virginia, MN last weekend. 34mpg with the cruise set at 70, most new four cylinders struggle to get that!

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Thanks Jeremy, I have been keeping my eyes open for, basically, the ones you mentioned including the Saturn. The kid thinks I'm stalling, but I just want to avoid buying something that is a documented pile of excrement. Geez, you have no idea how many beat up "Tuner Wannabes" I have said no to. Geez, if I had a dollar for every time her head snapped around to look at some warn out pile of junk with one of them "fart can" exhaust tips and "Kicker" in the window, we would just head to the new side of the lot.

Thanks for all the input guys, this probably won't be the last time I ask though.

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Have her take a look at an SC2. This was Saturns "sport" coupe. If it becomes a serious option get it only with the dual overhead cam engine. The single cams where prone to oil porosity problems in the head. Oil would leak through the casting and end up in the oil. The fix, replace the head! The 1.9 DOHC are good engines. Keep them lubricated and cool and they run forever.

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Quote:
Oil would leak through the casting and end up in the oil.

Jer, you may want to refrase that one... winkwink

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Uh Oh cant have oil in the oil. That aint no good. crazy

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O.K. I was typing before I was thinking what I meant to say is that coolant leaks through the casting and ends up in the oil. similar to a head gasket. I haven't had to replace one in quite a while but it does happen.

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I knew what you meant, just funnin' with ya. The more I hear about the Saturns the more I like them. A couple of guys at work drive them and really have no complaints. Thanks Jer.

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