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Sandmannd

Creeping Charlie and Crab Grass

6 posts in this topic

What's a good way to get rid of this stuff. I didn't get my weed killer fert down in time this year.

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I have used a product called Mec Amine-D. It has worked very well for me. It is a liquid and you would need to use a sprayer. If you just had pockets of creeping charlie a hand spayer works just great. As for the crabgrass granular is the way to go imo. If you keep your lawn mowed high and watered you should keep it in check. Hope this helps.

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Weed Free Zone liquid concentrate seems to be popular locally.

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Creeping Charlie is an FAQ for me. You are looking for a product with a high content of the active ingredient Dicamba. All of your chemicals are required to have an active ingredient list on the front of the package. Just look for one will a high content of Dicamba.

Some will tell you boron is the answer to Creeping Charlie. Be careful when using boron. A tiny bit too much and you will kill everything in the area. But if you don't use enough it will just act as a fertilizer. Boron can be a fertilizer in small quantities, in a very narrow window its a selective herbicide great with Creeping Charlie, or in modest to large quantities its a broad spectrum herbicide that will kill pretty much everything in the area.

Dicamba is your answer

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The product I have used that works great is Q4. Kills your broadleaf weeds as well as crabgrass.

I picked it up from Lesco. It is a bit pricey but works.

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One of the challenges is with creeping charlie or "ground ivy" is that it develops a waxy cuticle layer on the leaves that makes it difficult for herbicide to penetrate.

The best times to hit CC is when the flowers are blooming and in the fall after the first frost. Other times of the year and its pretty difficult to get consistent results.

I'm sure you'll find that it spreads by rhizomes creeping across the ground, when I'm trying to pull it out, I rake it with a hard tined garden rake. You can get quite a bit out since its an interwoven mat. I do that in the summer and spray whats left in the fall. Its been working pretty well.

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