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merkman

Polaris Ranger Crew vs. Kawasaki 3010 Trans Mule

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I am wondering which to buy here.

It looks like those are my only two options since I would like to buy a "four door" model.

I primarily would use would be,

1) Yard work.

2) Plowing the driveway

3) Driving to the Lake for ice fishing <5 miles down a county road.

4) Putting around the streets of our small town (i.e. grocery store etc).

5) Occasional trail riding down well groomed trails (old railroad tracks) with a bunch of old farts.

6) I don't see me riding in the deep woods or though much water/mud.

I have tried the mule and the ranger out.

Speed wise the mule goes plenty fast for me.

So far here is what I like

Mule

- Price

- Dependability these things seem to go forever with no problems.

- All steel construction.

- Accessibility everything is out in the open.

- Simpler no electronic [PoorWordUsage] to break.

- Seems more stable (lower center of gravity).

- Certified roll bars.

Ranger

- Shorter wheel base.

- Increased suspension travel.

- Increased clearance.

- More power (?)

- 4 wheel disk brakes.

- Better comfort more legroom.

- Better for the trails and mud.

Any input?

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not sure if the plow works the same as the quads, but the polaris quick connect system is great.

sounds like you have done your homework. I am sure you will be happy with either machine.

I would ride both and make your decision based on that.

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I've driven 2 different 3010 Mules extensively and both are really cold blooded. If you get the Mule, just make sure it has EFI and not the carb. They are great work machines and haul enormous loads with ease. The ride is so-so on rough terrain without the independent suspension design. I don't think you'd be disappointed with the Mule at all with EFI and if you are not looking for a strict trail machine.

I don't have any experience with the Ranger, but I've seen them do some amazing stuff in heavy snow on lakes in the winter.

I see the 2008 3010 Mules might be carb'd only, but looking at the Kawi HSOforum the 4010 Mules are EFI. I assume the 4010 model is 2009?

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I've driven 2 different 3010 Mules extensively and both are really cold blooded. If you get the Mule, just make sure it has EFI and not the carb. They are great work machines and haul enormous loads with ease. The ride is so-so on rough terrain without the independent suspension design. I don't think you'd be disappointed with the Mule at all with EFI and if you are not looking for a strict trail machine.

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I've got the 3010 Diesel mule, and I run Amsoil 0W-40 synthetic in there and it fires right up after sitting on the ice over night in -20 below weather.

In the summer i put a 110 gal tank with boom sprayer in the back and even with the weight sitting high, i can still crawl across the side of a hill that my Exmark mower has problems sticking to. Stability is great, durability is awesome, we use it for landscaping in the summer also. It can hold about a yard of mulch and it doesn't track the grass up like a bobcat. We haul paver blocks in with it, move dirt out with it...no complaints here. Just wish i would have gotten hydraulic lift for box.

Occasionally, i wish it could go a little faster, but you cant have everything i guess. I am still contemplating whether to put tracks on it for ice fishing.

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I drive a Mule 3010 at work and don't like it much, I drove the Mule before i drove a Ranger and easily decided to buy the Ranger. I'm not one of those guys that only reccomends the brand that he currently owns either.

The Mule is a strong work horse and is very low geared, which is fine hauling, towing or dragging but not very maneuverable in four wheel drive with the differnential locked. Carb model is very cold blooded and the plow system leaves much to be desired. The lift is slow and it's a rough ride.

The Ranger, of course is faster and won't make you go crazy trying to get five miles down the road to go fishing or whatever. Oh, and you'll be able to hold a conversation while you are driving the Ranger inside an enclosed cab, not very easy to do in the Mule cab. In Low range and four wheel drive with the differential locked you can still steer easily and it hauls, Tows and drags just fine for what I've put it through. I like the glacier plow system as it's winch lift and I got the winch that can be moved from the front of the vehicle to the back by pulling a pin and a wire coupler. I plowed a lot of snow this winter and never had a problem.

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