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How do you make a lindy rig?

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I usually make all my own lindy rigs and I was just wondering how most people make them. Do you use a spinner? what style hook do you use? I've heard a few guys say they use a plastic bead between the spinner and the hook. Just thaught this would be an interesting topic since most of us use this kind of set up.I make mine pretty simple. I loop one end and attach it to a swivel snap. the other end I put on a spinner on U shaped little thing I get at the bait store (I wish I knew the name of them) and then a hook. pretty simple. I know some people use floats on the hook end to keep there bait up off the bottom.

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Hey Zoom-

Some of the details that I have used are putting a two hook system with a #4 red hook up front and a #4 black hook in the rear about 3 inches apart. For some reason the walleye really attack that red hook which means fewer tail bite offs on your crawler. Using flo-carbon is a must for me. Usually 6-8 lb test for lindy rigs and 10-17 lb test for the spinner rigs.

Good Luck on your season.

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The "little u-shaped thing" is called a clevis.

FWIW I always put enough beads between my spinner and lead hook to keep the blade off the bait.

There's an endless array of options here, and I change to match the time of year, how I'm fishing, and how aggressive the fish are. In addition to the standard bead/hook live bait rig, or the 2 or 3 hook crawler spinner harness, some other tricks are rigging two spinner blades so they chatter, or rigging 2 spinners in line, or pegging a float a few feet in front of your spinners or beads. You can play around with blade sizes and styles. I've also played around with glass and brass beads but not been very happy with them.

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Usually with a plain hook the color of choice & maybe a bead with it, often not. 6 lb. line generally, line color depending on the lake, green in stained water, clear in clear water.

I use spinners very occasionally.

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I'll use both a plain hook and with a spinner. I'll usually use four or five beads between the hook and the spinner to keep the spinner off the bait. I typically go with a #3 colorado or #2 dakota blade. I used to use a single bead on a rig with no spinner for an attractant, but have recently switched to colored hooks instead. I'll use a #8 octopus hook for leaches, #6 for crawlers and for minnows try to match the hook size to the size of the bait. I'll use a two hook rig for a crawler with a spinner and a single hook for everything else. I'll generally tie a spinner with a three to four foot leader, because I'm generally running them on bottom bouncers. This seams to make them run about two to three feet up off the bottom. A plain hook I'll tie on sight because I'll move a lot slower and like to make the snell about two to three times as long as I'm graphing fish up off the bottom (ie. if fish are suspended two feet off of the bottom, I like a four to five foot snell). This should ride the bait about where the fish are suspended. If they're hugging the bottom, I'll switch to a jig. I'll use 6lb. mono for a single hook, 8lb. mono for a basic spinner and 10lb. fireline for a spinner and bottom bouncer combonation. I like to fix a barrel swivel on the opposite end for easy changes and reducing line twist with the a spinner.

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Just make sure to use at least one bead if you're going to be using more than one hook or you could run into legal issues.

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I'm a huge flourcarbon fan for leaders - all the flash and hardware will help you key in on the fish and "tinker" some, but on many occasions I've had someone in the boat who can't get a bite to save his life and once he switches to the flouro things improve. I used to think it was just by chance, but there truly seems to be a difference in clear lakes. I also don't go heavier than 6 lb. unless its a snaggy area or the water is pretty stained. I'd rather get more bites and risk losing a few than sacrifice the bites that I think goes back to light line. Not sure if its a visibility thing or if the light line helps the bait have more action.

good luck - erik

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The "little u-shaped thing" is called a clevis.

Yes thank You so much I spent hours laying awake that night wondering what the name of that D#@ thing was. Yes a clevis. Man I forgot about that until Tonight when I came back here and I'm so glad you named it so I can get some sleep tonight.If you haden't I would have been awake tonight trying to think of that name. And I'm not being a smart A$# either, I LOST sleep over that name. LOL laugh

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