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73mrpike

have we gone to far?

43 posts in this topic

i was talking with a friend at work and he told me he would love to go fishing but it cost to much. he said in order to fish he would need boat elecronics rods lots off tackle to just start i told him that was far from the truth. yes those would all be nice things. has it gone so far that people dont start this sport because they think they have to have all the bells and whistles. we went to walmart together he got a rod and reel combo 30 bucks tackle box 9 bucks needle nose pliers some small tackle a few rapalas and for about 100 dollers he was ready to go went from shore and caught bass a pike sunnies this guy is really hooked he calls all the time to go out now i think its great do others feel like i do that fishing is to spendy to get into or have we made it a glamour sport just looking for opinions

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I think in a way ...yes. Sad to say I think we have become a society of bigger, better, latest and greatest. My older brother got us into fishing in the 70's, although I love fishing it got so I hated to go with him. It was always a big "competition", once I lost a nice walleye right at the boat and he screamed at me for 10 minutes about how I messed up. I have some nice equipment, not the fanciest that I have accumulated over the years, some I thought I needed but have used very little. But come right down to it I am just as happy catching a bunch of crappies as I am catching a walleye. Most of the time I am just happy being out on the lake even if I don't catch anything. I look on it not as a sport but as a hobby or pastime.

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Nope, you can get into it for what you said. I have taken folks out and let them use a rod and my tackle. You have to make sure you enjoy it before spending the money. You can get buy with minimal items. I have some, not all, of the bells and whistles. But I go out every weekend. If you just want to do it a little don't invest a ton. Also, find someone with a boat and other things and build your tackle and rods up slowly.

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Im sure its just like anything else. It can be a bit intimidating going into a large store with all the options. Advertising makes us think we need all these gadgets to catch fish. It doesnt help when people who can afford to spend big bucks say that they have to have a $400 dollar rod to catch fish and all other rods are junk. Or a gps sonar unit is the most important thing to catch fish. When for a beginning angler a $30 combo will work just fine, and a free map from the DNR and a 99 cent depth bomb could help them determine depth. For the majority of the fishing I do all i need is a 14 foot boat, a few dozen jigs, a dozen spinners, plain hooks, sinkers, and one medium action rod. I guess its just because i can afford to spend the money. Ice fishing is the same way. Its easy to get over burdened with things you need to have and tactics to catch fish. When the simple tried and true methods are the best way to start someone fishing.

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Interesting topic. I was out yesterday and had a friend along who hasn't fished for 12+ years. He must have commented over a dozen times at how great fishing is.....we got to talking about gear and he asked how much you could get into the sport for. I made the comment that getting into the sport is pretty cheap and totally depends on what you want out of it. The expensive part is when your hooked on the sport of fishing and the items in your "wants" list start migrating towards the "needs" section. It's nice that the sport hasn't become too inflated with expensive toys and gadgets.....yet.

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All that fancy stuff is optional. Up until this year my boat was a 14 aluminum with a 6 hp motor. I caught just as many fish out of that as my newer fishawk with all the whistles.

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I think now a days some people when they think of fishing and watch all the fishing shows, they think they need all the bells and whistles to go out and fish. I have gotten a few of my friends into fishing just from shore. Heck there are some places that have great shore fishing. Me on the other hand I have been fishing all my life, and now I just want anything and everything. Even tho I dont need the stuff, I still want to get it.

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I grew up shore fishing, my roots are still there. Sometimes simple is better. Last weekend A friend and I fished this walk in, canoe lake. It was one of the more pleasurable fishing experiences. I had with me: a rod, 2 beetle spins, a paddle, water and a life jacket . . . simple.

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Back when I worked for MinnAqua we would fish with pop-can fishing "rods", a single aberdeen hook, and sinker- all a combo that would've cost each person about $2-and we caught all the panfish we could handle on that rig. Its too bad people get away from how simple this sport can be.

You wouldn't believe the amount of people that use "reel rigs" in Florida off of Piers- and they catch fish- they typically cost a couple of bucks to buy.

Remember fishing as a kid with a cane pole w/grandpa? I do, and those rigs were durn' cheap. We just annihilated the pannies with em too-on corn!

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I think there are a lot of truths being told here. A lot of "bigger is better", stores with all the fancy expensive stuff. Fishing shows where guys have some 4 - 6 locators, GPS, mapping units and all kinds of stuff hanging on their boat. Boats with rod holders and downriggers on every inch of the gunnel. 21' boats with 300hp motors along with kicker motors, transom electric motors, bow mount trolling motors, enough big drift socks to go parasailing (or whatever that sport is called).....the list goes on and on.

Truth is, fishing can be done by just about anyone with whatever means they have available. Truth be told, all it takes is a rod, reel, line, hook, sinker and worm (and maybe a bobber too). All the rest is like Boilerguy said....it's "candy".

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I agree with you all, but candy tastes ooooooh so gooood!!! laugh

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I've gotten along just fine all these years without the expensive gadgets/rods etc. Only recently have I started getting more "expensive" equipment, but it hasn't changed the enjoyment grin

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I agree with most everyone. Its all about what you want, how far you get into the sport etc...

For me, it boils down to convenience. All the candy you buy is to make life easier and somewhat more enjoyable. Its not needed, but it sure helps. If fishing isnt your #1 hobby, or even #2, then all the gadgets in the world arnt for you really. But for most of us, fishing is our #1 and it all becomes worth while.

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Obviously its a matter of choice on where to spend your disposable income. I have buddies that can't believe I would ever spend 200 dollars on a rod, but will blow the same amount in a casino or on pull tabs in one night. I don't gamble, rarely go to a bar. My hobby is the outdoors and better more reliable, not always more expensive gear makes my free time more enjoyable and comfortable for the time I do have away from work. I usually try to buy things gently used or save Christmas and birthday gift cards for big purchases.

I do agree that with anything you don't know much about, getting into it can be intimidating. But having someone there to show you what are essential and what are "extras" is key to finding the right balance between needs and candy.

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Let me throw out another perspective that I think has some validity because I’ve heard it many time and thought it myself once or twice. It’s true you can participate in just about any pastime at just about any level. But it often happens that the guy with the best stuff does better. When it comes to fish, a limited resource, they guy with the least stuff gets fewer fish. I like the HSO podcasts because they really help be understand fishing better, but if you outfitted yourself like the people that get interviewed, you’d be into a pretty expensive sport. Now, I know these guys often pros but they must think it’s worth it or they wouldn’t be spending. We all have “when I was a kid” stories. Mine: I used to fish for carp in the polluted river that ran through my city because they were the only fish that could live in it. In the summer, we’d go camping and my dad would rent us a row boat for a day. We were big time fisherman. Great times. But check out any post on equipment, rain gear, motors, you name it. I read it more often than not: “buy the best you can afford. You won’t regret it.”

All that said, I really hope that we can manage the resources we have so anyone can do well at any level they choose to fish at.

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i agree with ya, when all those extra accesories become have to have it becomes expensive. i get to blame it on my wife, and its worked well so far, i kind of mention this would be neat to have and i get it for b-day or something. next on the list is am ice saw. i have a good wife!!!!!!!

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If you start with me it'll cost you 0 dollars, I have enough equipment to let others borrow it. You can pick up some decent im-6 combos for $30-$40, they'll do the job just fine. Jig-heads or hooks and cheaper plastics will go a long ways. A $2 daredevil will probably catch more fish per dollar than any other lure you can buy.

So no you don't need $200 rods and $300 reels. In technology we would call those enthusiast gear, where only the top 1% of all anglers will need it, otherwise it's bought by others who have lots of money. There's performance which is usually the products that will offer you quite a bit of quality but won't cost you a fortune (25% of anglers would fall here). The rest would be entry level, spending the minimum to get the job done effectively.

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I think its the best when an old timer or just someone with not very fancy stuffs comes in a group of boats. and out fishes everyone and the guys with all the fancy stuff are just scratching their heads going "huh"? I know I grew up with a John boat with a 5 horse and thats how I learned to fish. My dad told me if I can fish out of that boat you can fish out of anything.

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I think many on this forum can attest that they used to catch many fish years ago, long before the fancy stuff. I know I have caught fish with nothing but cheap rods and reels and night crawlers. Heck I am not even that old and I can remember plenty of times fishing off shore or a small boat and getting more fish then I do now and I have pleny of gadgets and a great boat. Anyone can start small and build up to what their excitement/budget allows. Fishing is a sport where you learn everytime you go out, some of the toys just help the learning along not, always the catching.

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One of the big reasons that I fish from a [borrowed] kayak. I really enjoy the simplicity of the paddle and the small boat. It is so quiet and peaceful, and you can really get out of everyone else's way. I fish a lot of metro lakes, and many times I am the only one out there. I am in the middle of the city, and completely alone. Its almost priceless like that.

Fishing can be as expensive or cheap as you want it to be. I really appreciate the very nice equipment, but fully realize that it is not necessary. I would cry if my Loomis broke, but I would pull out my old ugly stick I started out with and get out to the lake anyway.

Fisherman though, are tinkerers and experimenters. It only natural that we have an unhealthy obsession with the toys of the trade. Especially here in MN. I don't know what I would do all winter if I wasnt playing with my tackle and dreaming of spring...

I

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To this day I will still cut a willow sapling tie some line on it, a hook on the end, a twig/or a cork if I have it for a float, dig a few good old garden worms and set on my dock and catch sunfish.

That is how I started out fishing as a little kid.

As stated earlier in this thread by others fishing can be as expensive and complicated as you want to make it.

I keep it pretty simple but still have a few expensive toys.

Lynn

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I said before all you need is a line, hook, and a worm.

Having said that, I'm in the middle of totally overhauling my boat to make it more comfey and user friendly. Yes, I'll have fancy electronics, a big Johnson motor, trolling motor, and various other candy.

I don't need all that, but I want all that. I feel I've elevated myself to what I consider the next level. I'm in my second year of using custom rods and higher end reels, also. Why? Don't take this as arrogance, but I can catch a fish anytime. Most of us can. Now, I want to consistantly catch big fish, all year long, during different weather conditions, and not rely on luck.

To each their own. None of us need the fancy candy, but there's nothing wrong with wanting and getting the fancy candy.

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Our world is all about biggest, newest, best etc. The nice thing about fishing is IT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE! To each his own. Like has been said, for many it isn't even about catching. It's about being out there.

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