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ejl

Venison Summer Sausage or breakfast sausage recipes

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Does anyone have a good Summer Sausage recipe or breakfast sausage recipe for venison?

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Here are a couple...

As you may recognize, I extensively use foodnetwork.com for recipes and save them to word documents for future use.

Great stuff.

People tell me I look like I like to eat.

Oops.

Elk Sausage Recipe Bobby Flay

4 to 6 pounds elk meat, well-trimmed (or other venison)

2 to 3 pounds pork fat, well-trimmed (2-1 ratio meat to fat)

1 tablespoon dry thyme

1 tablespoon dry oregano

1 tablespoon dry sage

2 tablespoons salt

1 cup finely chopped onion

½ cup finely chopped garlic

½ cup crushed red chili pepper flakes, (optional)

1 to 2 cups roasted, peeled, and diced green chili peppers (optional)

Sun-dried tomatoes (optional)

Additional garlic (optional)

10 to 15 feet sausage casing

½ cup maple syrup (for breakfast sausage - optional)

Grind each meat separately then mix together.

It is best if you grind the meat when it is very cold.

Mix the ground meat together with all the seasonings. Form into small patties.

Sauté a small piece and test for taste.

You may need to adjust the spices.

Next, place a length (10 to 15 feet) of sausage casing on a sausage horn and force mixture into casing.

Twist sausages in alternating directions to create 6 to 8-inch long sausages.

If well protected, finished sausages can be frozen in a non-frost free freezer for up to a year.

The sausages can be cooked directly on a grill or sautéed in a pan.

For best results, boil sausages first and finish on grill or pan.

Can serve with maple syrup.

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VENISON BREAKFAST SAUSAGE

This recipe will make 10 lbs. of excellent breakfast sausage.

5 lbs venison (well trimmed)

1 T. sage

5 lbs pork (butt roast)

2 tsp. garlic powder

½ lb. lean bacon ends

4 tsp. dry mustard

2 ½ T. coarse pepper

1 tsp. nutmeg

4 T. salt

1/2 tsp. cloves

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 tsp. allspice

Cut venison and pork in strips that fit your grinder. Combine all the seasonings (except garlic) in a bowl and blend. Sprinkle the seasonings and garlic over the meat. A large, plastic tub works well for this. Toss the meat until it is all well coated with seasonings. Grind once and mix thoroughly. Fry one small patty to check the seasonings. Adjust seasonings, if necessary.

Grind the meat a second time. Again mix it well. Add about 1 cup water during the mixing. Cover with plastic and let stand overnight in a cool place before packaging. Package the same as you would hamburger.

Note: Reduce the amount of spices if you prefer a milder sausage.

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Breakfast Sausage; Alton Brown

2 pounds ground pork

2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper

2 tsp finely chopped fresh sage leaves

2 tsp finely chopped fresh thyme

½ tsp finely chopped fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon light brown sugar

½ teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper

½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

Combine diced pork with all other ingredients and chill for 1 hour.

Form into 1-inch rounds.

Refrigerate and use within 1 week or freeze for up to 3 months.

Sauté patties over medium-low heat in a non-stick pan.

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My suggestion would be to do a search in Google Copycat Jimmy Dean Sausage recipes and there will be several web sites, you should find the copycat recipes for regular, maple and sage. I've tried them all and they are great.

On the summer sausage side, I've tried many different web site recipes and homemade recipes and really haven't found anything to my liking. However, I would recommend PS seasonings HSOforum, consistently great flavors and a wide variety of sausage to try. My favs are garlic summer sausage and jalapeno cheddar. The cure also comes with the package

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