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DT10 Guy

What to do with a biting dog???

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So I need some dog advice.

This weekend my pooch bit his second and third victims in an eight month period. Saturday, my cousin was playing fetch with him and when he reached down to grab the toy my dog tried to rip his finger off. The dogs snap reaction was totally unprovoked. My cousin had some pretty bad puncture wounds and needed quite a few bandages to stop the bleeding. About 5-10 minutes later after my pooch settled down I went over to him and was petting him when he decided to latch onto my hand leaving me with a mangled hand.

So I guess my question is, are there any training/disciple classes that we can work with my dog with? Or, do make the tough decision to put him down?

The thing that is freaking out my wife and I is that we are in the middle of our baby adoption process and soon an infant will be entering the house. With the pooch starting to just snap at people I really dont want to keep him in a house with an infant.

Any thoughts are appreciated.

DT10

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Three people is extreme! One may be a fluke, but now it's a trend.....A trip behind the barn ..or to the vet is the only cure...Dogs that bite have no place in mans' world...and most definatly if children may be involved.....good luck..uplander

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If you have ever watched the animal planet series on humane societies they give each dog the test of putting food down in front of it then reaching for the bowl with an artificial hand. Every dog that has shown aggressive behavior is deemed unfit to be placed and is euthanized. I wouldn't take the chance, plus if he bites a stranger you could end up being sued. If they find out that you knew about his behavior, well good luck in court.

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You are considering keeping a dog that bit 2 people in 10 minutes (including you?) and you are about to adopt a baby into your home? Even if you took 'classes' would you ever totally trust that dog in your home? I know I wouldn't. How are you going to feel if the next bite is on the baby's face? I know of someone that this happened to.

Hate to say it, but this animal needs to be put down. Especially if it is one of the sporting breeds. None have been bred to be aggressive and they better not display such manners. There are WAY too many good dogs out there and to keep one that bites unprovoked (especially it's master) around! I wouldn't ever consider giving him to a new home either. You would just be giving someone else your liability and this dog really does not deserve to be given a fourth chance.

Good Luck!

Ken

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It really pains me to say that it's probably best to put him down. I agree with others that you can't really give him to another home. Also, keeping him around a child is a no go for me. I love my dogs, but and it's a huge BUT, nothing comes before my child. It's your choice and it's a hard one to be sure. I would never want to put a dog down, but when they are biting, you aren't left with much of a choice.

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It's documented. You are aware of this dogs aggressive behavior. If it does it again, you are not only irresponsible, but LIABLE!

And with a new child coming into the home, this should not even be a discussion.

As terse as I am being here, please understand that I feel your pain, but you've got obligations to fulfill.

Good luck.

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This decision has been made for you. the dog needs to go. the next time could land you in jail, sued, or someone permanently disfigured (your child).

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Thanks for your responses guys. It definitely is going to be a sad day putting him down but it is the right decision.

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Thanks for your responses guys. It definitely is going to be a sad day putting him down but it is the right decision.

As painful as it is I can assure you you are making the correct decision. My buddy just put his lab down two weeks ago for the same reason. He waited much longer than he should have and more than 3 people were bit in this case.....but he eventually did the right thing. It was too bad because the dog was a good hunter.....but responsibility comes first and the bottom line was this dog could not be trusted.

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Thanks for your responses guys. It definitely is going to be a sad day putting him down but it is the right decision.

Thank-you from someone with scars from a childhood dog bite, and an owner of two dogs.

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Thanks for your responses guys. It definitely is going to be a sad day putting him down but it is the right decision.

I fully understand that dogs become part of the family. However, as painful as it is, you're making the right decision. There is no place in this world for a dog that bites, unprovoked, especially the master of the house.

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I would look a little closer at the situation and try and figure out if there is a logical reason the dog is biting. Is the dog experiencing any pain (bad tooth, bad hips, etc), does the dog think they are the dominate one in the family, how old is the dog, can you kennel the dog outside the house?

In the end you will know in your heart the right thing to do.

Tink

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I would like to think you could figure out what it is an address it. It may cost some money and time but I'm sure there are people/groups that specialize in this. I read that a good portion of the dogs from the Michael Vick dog fighting case have been rehabbed and may be given to families. I believe there's an article in national geographic about this.

Obviously your dog's case isn't that severe but I think it shows this bahavior can be corrected. Obviously you have to decide what's right for your situation so I wish you all the best in making your decision.

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.

Obviously your dog's case isn't that severe but I think it shows this bahavior can be corrected.

It isn't tht severe? Deep puncture wounds and a dog biting it's Master 10 minutes later while being petted? Sounds severe to me. I've come on here before

and advocated for another chance with dogs that have had a localized snapping or nipping issue... but deep puncture wounds and biting the hand that feeds you on top of another bite earlier... there is no re-hab. There should never be a reason to bite an owner while the owner is giving you attention... period!

Physical issues will not cause a dog to bit unprovoked. Unless it is in severe pain, which then, would be quite obvious. Moving the dog to an outdoor kenneal does not resolve the biting issue... it just lessens the opportunities for the dog to bite someone... but it will eventually happen again. It is an animal, some animals have issues and need to be dealt with, there are many other wonderful dogs that will fill the role of pet for this family without the worry of it ever biting their child... and you will NEVER trust this dog around that child ever, nor should you.

Good Luck!

Ken

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As much as I love my dog, and my previous dogs, if any of them had ever started biting, they would not be in my house long after that. My daughter loves to play with the dog. If I couldn't trust the dog with her, what would I be teaching her. Unfortunately being a responsible pet owner is not always the easy thing.

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When I mentioned severity I mentioned it in reference to the Michael Vick dogs. This dog wasn't trained to be aggressive it's showing aggression. If the Vick dog's that were trained to be aggressive for fightiing purposes can be rehabilitated then I would like to think this dog's behavior could be corrected. Now, whether the owner has the time and resources to do get the dog rehabilitated is a different story.

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Just curious..........would you mind saying what breed this dog is?

He is a 2 year old mix of a Shiba Inu and Pomeranian.

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Is there a chance this dog contracted rabies? That could explain the change in behavior. If the dog roams outside on a farm this could be the issue, atleast I wouldnt blow it off! I have had to take rabie shots myself, due to a biting dog.

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