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dust specs in wrapping epoxy

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I just applied the first coat of thread master lite on a rod and I have some dust specs in the finish. I am going to apply a second coat of thread master hi build to the rod, is there any way I can smooth the specs so the second coat will cover them?

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Take a razor and carefully slice off the lumps. Are you sure it is dust and not air bubbles? But either way you can slice the lumps off with a razor and re-coat with another coat of epoxy.

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If it's air bubbles, next time make sure you stir your epoxy longer, and maybe slower. What Thorne Bros does when you put your expoxy on your guides is (only try this if you are confident you can do this, it's pretty easy after doing this once or twice). They take a bic lighter and make a couple of passes over the expoxy (wrap) this takes any bubbles out and helps get it even.

If you have questions, give them a call , ask for Lonnie or Scott

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Bubble/air in the epoxy is a rod builders nemesis mad There are a whole list of things that help.

1. Try to have the room temp at around 70 - 75 degrees when mixing epoxy and coating the wraps..

2. Mix slowly to not introduce bubbles to the epoxy while mixing.

3. Warm up the epoxy before mixing, you can put it in your shirt pocket for a while or run it under warm water.

4. Pour the mixed epoxy out on a shallow dish of aluminum foil to thin out and release the bubbles.

5. Make sure you saturate the brush or use a spatula when applying the epoxy.

6. Don't vigorously brush the epoxy on the wraps, more like just use the brush to transfer the epoxy to the wraps and push it around.

7. Use a straw to gently blow on the wraps, the heat from your breath will usually thin it out enough to allow the bubble to pop, it also helps to smooth out any waves.

8. For the real stubborn bubbles a flame works well just be careful to not get the flame too close and keep it to the side not underneath. If it is cold in the room when I am wrapping I have used a propane torch, just be sure if you do that keep the flame 6 to 8 inches away and keep things moving.

There are probably a few more that others may chime in on, but these are what I typically use.

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also a drop or two of acetone added to the epoxy at the end of mixing can help release air bubles. Be aware that adding acetone will increase the cure time (i.e. don't go applying lables to the epoxy w/acetone for a few days). I like using a small butane blow torch.

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Thanks guys,

I will try the razor blade. My drying box is 75 degrees. It looked like all the air bubbles were gone when I mixed the epoxy. I will visit lonnie at Thorne Brothers, I have a rod to finish there.

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since we are on the epoxy questions. How much is enough? Should I not be able to feel the thread? Should I have the pronounced slight bubble coverage over the thread? Just wondering how much is not enough, or how much is too much? I have applied two light coats and just wondering how much I need to do before I call it good?

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Two coats s/b plenty. That's all I ever do. I don't like putting on one heavy coat.

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Quote:
since we are on the epoxy questions. How much is enough? Should I not be able to feel the thread? Should I have the pronounced slight bubble coverage over the thread? Just wondering how much is not enough, or how much is too much? I have applied two light coats and just wondering how much I need to do before I call it good?

I used to try for the thick glassy look cuz I thought it looked cool, now I try to get just enough on the guide wraps to get rid of the thread texture. You can literally just glob it on and let it sit for a few minutes and wick off what is hanging off the bottom of the wraps a few times and you will have just about enough to keep a nice flat, even finish. If you put on too much and just keep spinning it tends to either be wavy or you get the football effect.

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I would be extremely careful with a razor blade. Most of the time the cut can still be seen even after the second coat. Use a new razor to minimize. When mixing your epoxy use a very small mixing container. That way your hand can fit around it and slowly warm the expoxy as you stir it very slowly so very little bubbles are formed. If you get your epoxy to warm it can start to run on you and then all of the sudden start to set up. I usually get a cold one out of the fridge so I can enjoy a sip and not hurry my mixing. If any bubble are seen on the rod, a short huff of your hot breath can suck them out. Like mentioned above becareful with a lighter.

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I have cut the nibs of either thread or bubbles off many times and never had one show up after the the next coat. Just be sure you don't go deeper than you have to.

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