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52#FLATHEAD

parasites in the meat?

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I caught some big bluegill today. As I skinned the 1st one I noticed these black things in the meat, looked like someone sprinkled the meat w/ pepper. Also noticed some yellowish-cream colored spots in the meat. All the gills were like this. What are these things? Parasites?

I also caught some crappie out of the same pond & the meat was perfect, no spots.

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Nothing wrong with eating the meat. Cook it properly and you'll be fine.

Neascus and yellow grub are very common parasites. They are in just about every lake statewide, but do better on certain species in certain lakes.

Yellow Grub

Neascus

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It's quite common to see Neascus and Yellow Grub in panfish and some larger gamefish. Crappies are the only fish I find in lakes that arent neccesarily affected by those two parasites. You will find Neascus in just about every Metro lake in town or surrounding area lakes. I like the taste of panfish, but rarely eat them anymore due to that.

The DNR does say it's safe to eat if cooked properly and some people don't mind it. But for me it's too much. I will not eat a fish that has Neascus or the Grubs present. It just seems unappetizing. Thats just me though.

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Good info, thanks. I just can't get myself to eat fish w/ that stuff in the meat. It would be different if I couldn't see the parasites. Outta sight, outta mind.

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cut out the yellow ones. the black specks are nothing to worry about

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cut out the yellow ones. the black specks are nothing to worry about

I'm with you CNC, get rid of the yellow ones. I've eaten plenty of gills with the black spots and have never had a problem.

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I'll pass. Black spotters back in the drink, and yellow grubbers in the trash or garden.

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In the Chisago Lakes area, many of the gills here have the black spots. I and my wife have eaten quite a few, and while some will argue I am still normal.. LOL I do however do my best to cut out the yellow worms.

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Can you tell when you catch the fish which ones have the parasites before you fillet them? Should these fish be returned to the water?

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Most neascus and yellow grub are also on the exterior of the fish (not just the interior). Neascus looks like coarse pepper has been sprinkled on the fish. It's pretty easy to see, and you can clearly see heavily infested fish. A fish with a speck or two really shouldn't be a problem.

Yellow grub can often be seen at the base of fins. They are easy to overlook but if you carefully inspect the fish you should be able to find a few if the fish is being parasitized.

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