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vanhea20

Question about First Bike

9 posts in this topic

I'm looking at getting a motorcycle for the first time. I have never rode one before and wonder what would be a good bike to start on. I've talked to a few dealerships and have been told anything from a Ninja 250 all the way up to a 750 cruiser. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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How tall/big are you? Chances are you will get board with a smaller bike. Any bike will only go as fast as you twist the throttle. What kind of bike do you see your self riding? I have owned old style inline four crusiers, all out sport bikes, an now on a v-twin crusier. All are very different. I think if you go a liquid cooled inline four, a six hundered cc would be a great start. If you are going air cooled v-twin, I think 1100 or a 1300cc would be bike that would be ok to start on, but you would still ride for the next couple of years. As for the bikes you mentioned, I am assuming they have about the same power. For an example, I had a yamaha R6, which is a 600cc liquid cooled sport bike. Now I have a 1700cc air cooled v-twin. Bike has nearly 3 times the displacement, but about 75% of the horsepower, and way, way more torque. Two very different types of power.

Good luck, and if you have any specific questions on bikes be sure to ask, we all like to help.

One final thing, spend the extra money and take the 3 day safety class that is offered by the state. I had been riding for a few years, and then took the class, I broke a few very bad habits that I had.

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It all depends on what you are looking to do with the motorcycle. If you are using it strictly for a commuter, or if you plan on using it for trips. If it is strictly a commuter, you would be ok going with a lower cc. It also depends on your body size as well. More often the smaller the cc, the smaller the physical size of the motorcycle. Get one that fits you right. If it is too small physically, you will be uncomfortable while riding.

I personally would steer clear of anything less than a 500 CC. I would look into the 700-1000cc category. Even though it may seem a little "over powered" as a first bike, you will never be sorry you went bigger. If you get a smaller cc motorcycle, chances are after you are comfortable riding it, you will be looking to upgrade really fast.

I purchased my motorcycle as a junior in high school and we looked at a variety of different sizes. I decided on an 1100. It maybe was a little "too much" out of the gate, however just because it can do 140 mph, doesn't mean that you will be pushing the envelope. Having the extra power behind you when you need it definately has it's advantages. I still ride the same bike that I purchased 13 years ago. I haven't needed to upgrade, and I definately didn't outgrow it yet.

Good luck,

CA

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I would start with a cheap one that way when you dump it on its side in the parking lot etc. its not that big a deal. Also lets you get in to the sport and gives you an idea if you like it or not without a big financial commitment. Lots of older nighthawks or viragos out there that have a lot of life left in them. great starter bikes.

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i agree with iron cowboy. im a fairly new rider and went cheap. i got less than 500 in everything. including the helmet. a cheap bike isnt gonning to be worth less in 2 years. if you do like i did and start fixing little things on a cheap bike, and it tips over in the garage or on the lawn its no big deal if u got 500 in it. Different story if you have 5000 in it

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What ever you end up buying make sure you take the time to take a training course. It may save your life.

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Yes, take a training course, it does not matter what you get if you can't ride it safely.

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Also agree with the training. Sign up for a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) course near you. Its around $100, they supply the bikes and you get a deal on insurance.

Now,

What TYPE of riding interests you? Sport riding? Cruiser style? On/off road type?

If you like the sportbikes, Ninjas, GSX-r's, R-1's etc, I would look at a used 600cc bike. ALL the power/speed any mortal needs on the street. BUT, these bikes are not meant for inexperienced riders, the brakes will spit you on your head, and the power will catch you out in the lower gears. Also good learners bikes are Suzuki GS500, Suzuki Bandit, Kawasaki Ninja 650.

As for a cruiser style, look at a used Honda Shadow 600, maybe a Kawasaki 450 LTD etc.

Find somebody that knows a thing or two to help you look at used bikes, so you dont get a lemon.

But, by all means, start at a safety course, lots of helpfull people there.

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Find somebody that knows a thing or two to help you look at used bikes, so you dont get a lemon.

Amen, brother smile My first bike, a '82 Virago 750, had leaky shocks (thus bad front brake) and a bad starter. Easy to spot for someone with experience, but not me at that time, haha! Cost me plenty after the sale. Otherwise a Virago is a good first bike for cruiser fans.

Good luck!

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