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nofishfisherman

Looking for info on Vizslas

19 posts in this topic

My wife and I are looking into getting our first dog this summer. We just bought our first house and we are working on fencing the yard right now. While that work goes on we are doing research on the breeds we like. We are both very drawn to Vizslas both becuase of looks and temperment.

We are not hunters so the dog would not be trained for hunting but I am outside alot and want a dog that likes it as much as I do.

We have heard that they are very trainable and are very eager to please and obey, how true is that?

The down sides we have heard are if they get bored they will chew and get into everything. They have lots of energy that needs to be burned off everyday.

I am interested in hearing other Vizsla owners experiences, what are peoples recommendations?

We are in our mid 20's with no kids and live in St. Paul with a yard that will soon be fenced.

Any input would be welcomed.

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I have a Vizsla, and think I always will. I also love the temperment and they are beautiful.

They are like any hunting dog, full of energy, and with a need to run, often. My dog is an outside dog, and has a 10'x20' kennel he can run in during the day, and he is with me at night. I think the big issue is can you let him run like he should.

He was easy to train, but similar to any dog, needs you to put in the time to do it. He does not jump on people, furniture, walk in a door, etc. unless he is told he can. Very well disciplined.

I have some friends who run marathons, and their Vizsla runs with both of them everyday, and loves it. My dog will hunt for 12 hours, and then get home and runsome more. I guess what I am saying is if you can let them move and burn off steam, they are wonderful. If that is not what you do, get a different specie.

Good luck.

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Giving the dog enough chances to run is my biggest concern. It can run all it wants in the yard and walks are no problem. I use to be a competitive runner but in the last few years have gotten away from doing it everyday.

Training is someting my wife and I are committed to and would be an issue with any breed of dog so I am not worried so much about that.

Would time in the yard plus visits to the dog park and regular walks be enough for most Vizslas? Or do they really need to be on a marathon trainging schedule?

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I don't think Vizslas are outside the exercise requirements of any of the hunting breeds, I just hate to see any dog not be able to get out and run. IMHO it leads to bad behavior, chewing, etc.

I have no issues with the breed, and unlike the popular breeds, your chances of getting one with genetic defects is very minimal. There are simply not enough lines out there, and there is more responsible breeding.

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If you haven't already run into it, visit MIRA's Vislas HSOforum. It has links to tons of info on Vizslas. I didn't get mine from MIRA's, but did learn a ton from the site.

I'd suggest getting one from a reputable breeder, not just from an ad in the paper. True, there aren't many genetic problems at this time, but I've heard there is an significant amount of breeding going on without much attention given to genetic backgrounds, tempermant and breed standards.

Vizslas are more "popular" than years ago, and some people aren't aware of or warned of the exercise (daily) many dogs, Vizsla's definately included, need. There's been an increase in Vizsla rescues as a result. People see a great looking, well manner dog, like Farmboys or mine, and want one, but aren't told by some breeders the time and energy they require. If a breeder doensn't ask you what seems to be alot of questions, they may be in it only for the money.

They definately worth all the time to exercise though. Very beautiful, smart, easy to train, sweet and loving dogs.

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I had a vizsla for many years and the next dog that I get will be another one. He was easy to train and quickly became a great member of my family. He was very good with my young nephews and niece. They are a fun loving dog that will do almost anything to please their owner. I don't think that they need anymore exercise then any other dog breed. I never had any problems with chewing with mine but I'm sure that can vary from dog to dog. Traditionally they are not known as cold weather dogs but my dog enjoyed retrieving/hunting so much that he often times duck hunted into early november with me. I know that you are not planning on him as a hunter but I think the example just shows how much they try to please their owners. He was easy to housebreak and just the greatest dog a guy could ever ask for. Sorry if I am rambeling. I had to put him down almost two years ago and not a day goes by that I don't hope that I will wake up and he will still be there, I cannot reccomend the breed enough.

DSCF0054-1.jpg

I always thought that if dogs could smile, this is what it would look like!

Dan

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Thanks for the replies.

A good point was brought up about the genetic defects with the breed.

We defintely will be doing research on breeders, not sure where to start with that though. I know there are some rescue programs around for vizslas and that may be an option as well but I think we want a puppy for our first dog like most people do.

You guys have really pretty much repeated all of the things that I have heard about vizslas and why they make such great companions.

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Mabie some of the other guys will disagree with me but I think sporting breed dogs should only be sold to active hunters or people involved in field tests and trials. Why buy a Ferrari if your only going to drive it in 1st gear? These dogs are born to hunt. I'm a longtime vizsla owner and I'll admit I'm kind of protective of the breed. Vizslas are lower maintence, nail clipping and exercise besides quaily food and water are about it. I think Vizlas are easy to please, but can more difficult to train because they can be senstive to harsh training methods. You will get much better results from positive reinforcement or clicker training. They like to be in your lap or involved in whatever you do. If your set on a Vizsla, I highy recommend Kathy Rust of Kizmar vizslas. You can do a google seach on Kizmar and find her webpage. She is involved in breeder referral and her dogs are combination show, agility, hunt test (and more) lines (slightly weaker hunting lines) but she is a good breeder and very health conscious so they would make better house dogs. You also may want to consider a Rescue dog. There are a few rescue vizslas available now that I could get you in contact with if your not set on a puppy. Another good reference is the twin cities vizsla club. They also have a HSOforum and breeder referral info.

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I don't think we need to hunt to appreciate the breed so I would have to disagree with you.

Why buy a St. Bernard if you aren't going to put a small Whiskey Barrel around its neck and send it out looking for people caught in a snow storm?

By not hunting with a vizsla we do nothing to harm the breed. Even if we used it for future breeding its bloodlines remain the same.

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So you have never owned a vizsla but plan on breeding in the future?

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I would tend to agree with the notion that if I didn't hunt that I would go with a breed that was not expecting genetically to hunt by blood. I think that is has to do with any dog bred specifically for something like upland hunting.

No matter what the dog will get bored if it is not involved in hunting with its owner or training for bird hunting. From experiences with higher energy dogs like vizsla's they will get bored and develop some bad habits.

But if you have the time and energy to deal with one and you really have gotten to love them then I think you will have fun. smile

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So you have never owned a vizsla but plan on breeding in the future?

No, I was speaking purely hypothetical.

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By not hunting with a vizsla we do nothing to harm the breed. Even if we used it for future breeding its bloodlines remain the same.

Just for future reference, the hunting instinct is partially genetic, but it is really brought out by exposure to hunting. I won't get into the nature vs nurture debate but 90% of buyers who are looking for a hunting dog, will only buy from breeders who hunt both parents. They will also usually expect hunting related titles within 2 generations. If you do plan on breeding in the future, I think you will have a harder time selling them, or the market price will be so low that it will not be worth your time. I don't think a dog should be have a litter unless you can improve the quality of a breed, not just maintain what you have.

Pike also brings up a good point that a hunting dog that has instincts to search out and chase percieved game. That includes chasing squirrels, rabbits, and running away. A pointing dog is usually comfortable running a long way from it's handler, esp if it has any field trial parents.

If someone wanted to purchase a vizsla from me with your background, I think I would only sell one in case of a spay/neuter contract for papers, or limited registration to prevent breeding mistakes. There are lots of unwanted sporting breeds in rescure or pounds from owners who don't understand the needs of a sporting dog. I'm not trying to be mean/arrogant or anything, but too many vizslas are bought based on their looks alone.

They are great dogs but I just wanted to let you know what your getting into. Your doing the right thing by researching before you buy. I think you would be totally happy with a Kizmar or rescue dog as mentioned earlier. You could also get in contact with other vizslas owners through the TC vizsla club.

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I haven't owned a viszla so I can't give specifics on the breed. I have owned a few dogs though and want to add that just because you have a fenced yard does not mean the dog is going to exercise itself out there. You are going to have to go out their EVERYDAY and play with it and exercise it. Letting it loose in the yard will do nothing for its energy. Most dogs will just sit by the door wanting in or develope some bad habits like barking or chasing things up and down the fence line, such as cars or people. I have 80 acres surrounded by 100's of acres of state land. When I let my dogs out they go do their business and spend the rest of the time sitting in the deck waiting for me to come out. When I come out they play with each other, me and run around like maniacs and I still take them for a run in the woods on the atv or a long walk. The point is most dogs won't exercise themselves and want you out there with them because they want your companionship. One other thing to think about is, your a young couple and may start a family in the future. Are you still going to find time to exercise the dog everyday with a baby in the house? I have seen way too many times when a baby comes along there is no time for the dog and it has to go.

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No reason to have to hunt to own them. I can tell you the winner of the VCA National field trail, Gus, does not hunt with his owner but only worked birds while training to compete. I have had V's for 20 years. Mira vizslas does a very nice job and has so for 40 years. ON the rescue dogs. Some are nice and have been a good match for some people. One of the reasons they are on the rescue list is people do not get them from reputable breeders, and they do not give them the exercise they need. A great breed. I lived in St. Paul and had them there. Post if you need more info.

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looks like a beutifull breed it sounds a lot like my breed, Large munsterlander,in temporment. They dont like like to be left alone and they will let you know by tossing the place.If your not home much Look for a breed that can accept being alone.

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I am glad to see someone agrees that I should be allowed to own one without hunting it.

I disagree with alot of the opinions that have been stated here about who should be allowed to own certain breeds and from my perscpective it does cause you to sound very arrogant and slightly self righteous, although I know that is not your intent I am sure.

If and when we buy a Vizsla it will have a yard to run in and I will be out there playing with it and tossing it balls or anything it wants to chase down.

We will be deligent in training and we will do the best we can to ensure it will listen when we speak.

I don't forsee ever hunting with it but I see no problem with that. Chances are there is no breed we can buy that we could use for its true bred purpose. Really all dogs have been changed by humans to fit our needs some people just think that certain breeds should be trained/bred to fit only their needs. When in fact a Vizsla can fit the needs of many different types of people hunter or not.

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I don't think that anyone is saying you shouldn't be allowed to own a Vizsla.

They are just expressing what happens to dogs like these that are not trained to hunt. They will expect to hunt no matter what. Nobody is saying that you wouldn't be a great owner or anything like that.

If you have been are hunters like Vizla or any kind of pointer. They want to run and range a lot. A yard will only contain them for so long. They will try everything possible to get out in the open.

I guess I would just take it as information that you asked for. This is your first dog and people here have had 10-20 dogs in their life. So I think that people are just giving you their honest opinion about the breed and what they are like.

There are lots of good looking dogs that love to be outside also. Just make sure that you have spent time with these "styles" of dogs because people are not just doing this to burst your bubble on them.

They are telling you this because the people here have owned them.

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You really do not have to hunt them. If they want to go around the yard and point at things great. No need to take them to the field. They are great agility dogs and obedience dogs. Even if you do not hunt you can take them and run them in a hunt test for the Junior hunter level. That just requires that you carry a blank pistol and when the bird flushes within range you fire a blank pistol shot. Pass that test 4 times and you have your JH. Never have to shoot a shotgun. My Dad got one from me years back and did not hunt her even though she was a very nice field dog. She liked her pampering and minded very well for them for quite a few years. Do not shy away from the breed if you are not going to hunt. BUT do let the people know that it is not a priority for you in owning the dog so they can help you pick out a puppy that will suit your needs. That is the best advice you can get.

Oh by the way. Again hunt them or not. I have rarely met a V owner who only has one for very long!!! That says volumes.

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