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fishinchicks

Camera settings question

6 posts in this topic

I am attending a piano recital this afternoon in our high school auditorium. I will be bringing my new (to me) Canon Digital Rebel XT, with the EF 35-80 lens (my only lens). Any suggestions on how to get decent pictures with poor lighting? I will be bringing my tripod. This is a big deal to our family, since they are having a tribute/memorial for our godchild Emilee, who would have been at this recital. She was one of the four children killed in the April bus accident.

Thanks for any advice!

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I don't shoot indoors, so all I can suggest is to shoot in aperture priority and open up all the way, with the ISO set at 400. I don't know how this camera handles at ISO 800, but you could try a couple at that setting. It's good you are going to have a tripod. You'll need it. What time is this recital? I just bought an external flash I'd be happy to let you borrow. However, I've only used it outdoors once, so I'd need to quick read up on the proper settings.

If there is time to run in and grab my flash, give me a call at 507-530-5940.

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First of all I would like to say that I'm sorry for your loss. What a tragedy. As far as photos with poor lighting the tripod is a must. You may have to adjust your shutter speed down to compensate for the poor lighting. On that camera it should be marked TV (time value). It would help if you had an additional flash for that situation. The closer you could get to the pianist, the better off you will be. Maybe get there early if possible to try different shutter speeds to find the one that works best in the lighting situation. Hope it helps and good luck.

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Your lens has a variable aperture which means that you will have a maximum aperture of either 4.0 or 5.6. Being close to the action will allow you to use a focal length closer to 35mm. This will allow for the use of aperture f/4, which will allow maximum light in. You should have no problem using ISO 800 and still get good photos. ISO 1600 would be better for faster shutter speeds, but will get a bit grainy. A tripod will take any movement from the photographer out of the equation, but it will not prevent motion blur from your subject. My best guess is that you should try to be at 1/60th second shutter speed or faster to minimize motion blur. At that speed a tripod isn't all that necessary and you may find it to be in the way at an auditorium. If I had your gear, here is how I would initially set up: Get close, ISO 800, set camera to AV mode and set to f/4. If your shutter speed is 1/60th or faster...good. If too slow, try your pop-up flash or bump up to ISO 1600. If your shutter speeds are significantly faster than 1/60th, you can try ISO 400 for better image quality. If you can get your hands on an external flash, that will help a bunch.

We would love to see how the photos turn out.

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Thanks guys. I have to finish getting ready, then head into school. I figured I could use one of my daughters as a test subject before the recital begins. I will let you know how the pictures turn out.

Thanks for the offer on the flash X, but I am not sure I would have time to learn how to use it before I would need to leave.

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This is one of those situations where "P" mode will give you the best results. Sorry I was to late to offer any help. Variable aperture lens with lousy lighting and the camera program mode will give you decent results witht the pop up flash. You can dial in some FEC for the built in flash to help you knock down or add fill as needed.

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