Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

  • Announcements

    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Sign in to follow this  
Guest

Cycle, not stroke

Recommended Posts

Guest   
Guest

Why do folks persist in making references to "two stroke" motors?

Ever since the four-strokes made the scene, we get talk of "two-stroke."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest   
Guest

My but that's a thoughtful and illuminating response.

Incidentally, where does one find "pro crappies," and how does one go about guiding them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest   
Guest

Clayton, I am guilty of saying "two Stroke" just because I don't know anything about motors. Would you mind explaining what a 2 cycle is and how it works compared to a 4 stroke. Like I said, I just fish, I no nothing about motors. Thanks ScottS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why not use "stroke"?

2-stroke: 2 piston strokes per cycle
4-stroke: 4 piston strokes per cycle

It's a one syllable word...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ScottS your in tough shape, no motors have strokes, the have brushes and windings and magnets, engines have strokes and cycles and stuff. Anyway....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest   
Guest

It is inevitable that every person on this board will at some point in time be given some $h!t.

So thank you Clayton, and good fishing!

PCG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cycle is the crankshaft going in circles.

stroke is the piston moving up and down.

So in order to get a stroke you must have a cycle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 stroke....
a. piston moves down and the cylinder fills with fuel from the intake valve(s).
b. piston moves up and compresses the fuel.
c. plug fires and piston moves down.
d. piston moves up exhausting the spent fuel through the exhaust vavle(s).

2 stroke.....
a. piston moves down and gets fuel when the cylinder clears the intake port.
b. piston moves up sealing the intake port and compresses the fuel.
c. plug fires and piston moves down until the cylinder passes the exhaust ports. The compressed gasses escape and fuel is reintroduced into the cylinder.

In summary, two stroke means you get one up stroke and one down stroke of the piston per rotation of the crankshaft. A two cylinder engine at 1000 rpm (at the crankshaft) is firing each piston at 1000 times per minute.

A four stroke has an intake stroke and an exhaust stroke seperated by the use of valves instead of ports. A two cylinder four stroke fires each cylinder only 500 times per minute to achieve a 1000 rpm crankshaft speed.

------------------
I fish.....Therefore I grovel.

Here....Fisheeeeeeee!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest   
Guest

Thanks Wastewater, that is all I was looking for. Makes sense to me now.

And KING, thanks for clearing that up...I am sure that is the last time I will make that mistake!!ScottS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes I motor across the lake, using my engine. When I fish for crappies, I most certainly only catch amateurs. Sometimes my depth finder is hard to read. Wish it always gave me an illuminating response. Too much beer in my intake port and I’m soon using my exhaust valve. Too much deer sausage, and I’m using my exhaust port. When I was younger, was multiple stroke, multiple cycled engined guy. Now, by definition, more of a motored guy. And lately, the walleyes have been giving me $h!t.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For once, a light-hearted thread!

I need to be exposed to these more often.

Nice post, Muleskinner. That's the way to apply newly acquired knowledge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this