Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

  • Announcements

    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Sign in to follow this  
rosspj59

trailer bearing work

Recommended Posts

Can anyone recommend a service shop to do trailer bearing service work. I tried doing a search for previous posts and did not have success. Just need to do a maintenance update, nothing is broke. Preferably in the northeast metro. Don't really want to wait for the dealership to get me in or pay their high prices. I realize I could probaly do it myself, but I don't want to mess up. Email info to rosspatrick59@hotmail.com. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave, that's one option. I called discount tire first and they did not do the service. I was kind of looking for a business others had used and trusted. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a modest investment I have all the tools at my house to take care of bearings. I do all the repacking of my own and it saves a ton of money. A grease gun and a double funnel looking contraption with a grease fitting on the top (for the life of me I dont remember what it is called) for packing the bearings and a brass drift for knocking out the old seals and you are good to go! 2 hours and a couple of brews and you are done! Just a thought, there is not much that you can "mess up" actually! Take care and N Joy the Hunt././Jimbo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recommend going with a synthetic bearing grease (such as Amsoil) as a synthetic will not deteriorate if water contaminated like the petroleum based greases will. As far as the name of the Gizzerbeetus used to pack the bearings that looks like two funnels with a grease zerk attached, that is called a .......bearing packer( as opposed to what the Viking should do to Green Bay.... burying Packer...sorry couldn't resist). As far as removing the seals, I have found that using a tool called a "lady foot prybar" works the best. If any assistance is needed I am more than willing to show you how to do this and from there on out you will be able to do this yourself. I can be e-mailed at rwander1227@aol.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I replaced my own bearings for years-until I realized I could buy complete new hubs with new bearings, new seals, etc. for only a couple bucks more than it cost me to buy all the components. Northern Tool and Equipment and several mail order catalogs sell complete hubs. The most expensive hubs are around $27 each, many are less. Buying all the components will cost about $15 per hub. Just remove the old and install the new-not much to it. The best part is now you have an extra hub or two to carry in the truck. If you ever have a breakdown on the road simply put the old hub back on until you can get a permanent fix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Superduty,

That is awesome...I will definately check out Northern for new hubs! How does that work then? Can I use any hub that fits or are their hubs that are rated for a specific weight? Would my current hub have a part number or weight rating?

Muskieguy.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Superduty - In a word "Brilliant!" Never thought of that and I have spent a lot on bearings and such.

What do I check to see if Northern has the right hub? I suppose I could take one off, but there must be some measurements that can be taken. Also, what weight hub (2000 pound? 3500 pound?) for a 16 foot crestliner with a 40 horse motor?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will need to know what size spindle is on the trailer and what bolt pattern for the lugs. Check to see if your current hubs have studs for lug nuts or female threads for bolts. They come both ways. Standard sizes are usually 1" or 1 1/16" x 1 3/8". If you have a straight spindle it's probably 1". If it is tapered it's probably the 1 1/16 x 1 13/8. The hubs I bought were 1750 lb capacity and $27. Smaller hubs are cheaper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yellowdog, you will probably have to take one off to find the right size. Unless you remember from the last time you redid the bearings. If I had to guess, 1" would be the most likely for that size trailer. I would take a hub off to be sure though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While that's a great idea if you know the bearings are bad, some may need to save that chunk of change. I'd invest a little time and $2 worth of grease and repack the bearings myself. It's quite easy to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, did a little research and decided to give it a shot myself. From what I have heard and read it is very easy and pretty hard to screw up. If I do screw it up somehow, I can go to Northern tool and buy a new hub.

Muskieguy.....

P.S. I called my local dealer and they want 79.99 to repack bearings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I would stick with a good old repack job.

I don't have alot of faith in northern hydraulics items.

Usually when something is that cheap its a red flag for me anyways. When I have had to replace my bearings it always costed me more than the hubs you guys are talking about. but i always put in good bearings.

Just my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just put a new set of bearings and seals on our trailer 2 days ago at a cost of $39.06 for a 1 3/8" inner, 1 1/16 outer. According to the catalog the same with new hub, bearings and seals is $ 49.99. Throw in the paper towels and the mess, if I lived close enough to pick the hubs up, thats the way I'd go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I understand the only thing I should have to buy is grease Correct? As long as my current bearings are fine I shouldn't have to buy anything else right?

Muskieguy.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably have to buy an inner seal also. You have to remove that seal in order to remove the bearing. No sense putting a used seal back on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave -

I agree--getting my own hands dirty is money saved--but the problem I have is that that inside of the hub is chipped away and the bearings don't seat all that well.

Replacing the inner and outer bearings and seal is really a piece of cake. I can see putting new hubs on, bearing buddies, and synthetic grease in once and while. Call it good to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always wear a pair of rubber surgical type gloves when I do mine. Just throw away when finished.

I also use them when filling gas before fishing or hunting for scent control.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody remember packing bearings by hand and what a messy pain in the butt it was compared to the grease gun attachment bearing packers of today? Those things make the job a simple no brainer. Clean up your bearings and repack them. It costs almost nothing and if done fairly frequently the bearings will lost a long long time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know much about this bearing stuff. My boat trailer tires have a grease zerk on them that i just attach the grease gun to to pump grease in. How is this different than what you are talking about? What are the pros and cons of that versus your way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this