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Looking for feedback on camera's

7 posts in this topic

I had the first Aqua-View with infared lights a few years back and it was still worthless for night viewing so i got rid of it. With so many new models and brands out now iam looking to get another one. Can you tell me what you like about your camera? Do the lights work good on the new Aqua-View? Ive heard many good comments on the Vista Cam and i like the VEX mount option. Any feedback would be great. Thank you D-man

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MILLE LACS AREA GUIDE SERVICE
651-271-5459 http://fishingminnesota.com/millelacsguide/

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D-MAN

I just picked up a Vista Cam, I have not had a chance to get it in the water yet so I can't comment on how it works under water, I've been messing around with it in my house and from what I see it should be very intertaining in the fish house.

The only concern I have is how much the lights will effect the fish.

I can hardly wait to get it wet.

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Yes is does have the infared lights
I'm not sure they will effect the fish but some anglers believe that these lights scare walleyes away.

I guess I'll have to wait and see for myself.

I know I'm really going to enjoy watching the under water world of Lake Vermilion this winter.

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D-man & jcrash,
The IR lights should not effect the fish. I bought a OVS camera last July. Used it mainly up on Kabetogama and Namakan lakes, also here on Superior. I've used it mainly with the weight and fin, trolling with the bow electric. The OVS has both IR and the visible green/red lights. Night viewing was poor to nonexistent with the IR, but the lights were pretty cool. I believe that these visible lights will effect fish to a degree. I used the IR alot even during the day and never got any reaction from either walleyes or smallies. Had them bump the lens and several swim along with it for up to 30 seconds. Suspended particles will be the most responsible for poor visibility. When trolling in complete darkness I found if I kept the camera about 8" off bottom I got the best results.
I was truly expecting to be disappointed, even went so far as to have the store mngr guarentee that if not satisfied I could return it. I am satisfied and cannot wait til ice-up to use. Even used it to find a pair of sunglasses my wife dropped overboard on a previous trip in June on Namakan.
No experience with the others, sorry. Xplorer

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I don't know if this is what you want to hear, but I bought the aqua-vu last winter (model with the multi-color lights, supposedly for better visibility) I used it a few times in the Detroit lakes area, but brought it back because I found it to be worthless. When I turned on the multi-color infereds I actually couldn't see as far, because the monitor was thick with white particles picked up. On Ottertail lake which according to the dnr lake survey has a clarity of about 9 feet I could only see about 2 at best, day or night. As for scareing fish, I don't know, the perch didn't seem to mind though. I think that the Fl-8 is the ticket though, and I'm sure the fl-18 will be more usefull as well.

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Hey D-Man, We Have used Vista cam and Auqa View. Both work good. As far as the IR goes my feelings are one does not need it. The water on Mille Lacs is by far the clearest water that we fish and the natural light is all you need. When losing natural light the micro organisims/algae particles really start to glow from the IR lights causing a snowy effect. On other lakes that are not as clear the same seems to hold true. We have seen fish at night but they have to be very close as your field of view is very diminished. As far as walleyes go I feel that there is something that they do not like about the IR lights. We experimented in a variety of settings with the position of the camera and even camouflaged it. The walleyes just would not come in. We rigged a system that allowed us to place the camera above the bottom and scan the area slowly. We could see the walleyes on the fringes but they just would not come in. Did not seem to matter to other species. Were looking into building our own camera with lights we can turn on or off. It has'nt helped us catch more fish but it sure is interesting to see whats down there... Have fun.

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