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BigRoy

Question about Ford powerstroke engine

16 posts in this topic

I am in the process of looking for a new (used)F-250 and was wondering what kind of fuel economy I would get with the Powerstroke diesel. I have been thinking about maybe searching for one with a 460 gasser but would like to have the power and economy of the diesel. I am looking at pick ups between the years of 1992-1996. The box size is a bit smaller on the new one and my pop up wont fit in that style. Anyone one had any bad experiences with the 7.3- I would like to hear that also. Thanks for any info you can help me with.

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BigRoy, I just purchased a '99 Superduty with the powerstroke, I wanted a new Dodge, but payments made me back out. I am very happy with the diesel motor, it has a lot of power, especially at low rpm. I just bought a used 18,000lbs flatbed trailer, and I was worried to pull it.....not a problem. Talking to many Ford owners, they are very happy with their motors, they are generally good up to 250,000/300,000 miles.
If it was my choice I would have gone with Dodge Cummins, then Chevy Duramax, then Ford, but......
Mileage with mine is great, average 18mpg, and fuel is at least $.10 cheaper.
New Powerstrokes have a lot of problems, they blow motors after few thousands of miles, due to 100hp increased from 2002 models.

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Big Roy
I have a powerstroke and DITTO what Valv said!!

------------------
Try Too Fish
Forced Too Work!!:)

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The Powerstroke is a great engine, no doubt about it. Some of the later models suffer from a condition known as fuel cackle, but this does not to appear to be harmful. With year spread of trucks you are looking for, it should not be a problem anyway.

The predecessor to the Powerstroke is a good motor also, although it is indirect injection and has no turbo. My brother in law has one for a farm truck and it has been bullet proof.

The best milage will come from the Dodge Cummins. Prior to 1998.5 model, the Cummins engines are 12 valve motors with mechanical injection pump. This injection pump is lubed with engine oil, and is very reliable. It is not unusual to see 22 MPG unloaded with this motor.

The 1998.5 model went to the 24 valve engine with an electronic injection pump. This pump is lubed by the diesel fuel itself. Milage is a tad less with this setup, but power and torque are higher. The weak link in this truck is the fuel lift pump between the tank and the injection pump. They are prone to failure, which can starve the injector pump.(A bad thing) This is easily fixed by installing a fuel pressure gage for about a hundred bucks, so you can see when the lift pump is going south on you.

I have a 2001 Dodge, and have been getting 19.5 to 20 MPG unloaded on summer blend fuel. I have 100 k on the truck, and have been very happy with it. Loaded MPG will drop that figure down to 18MPG.

I'd steer clear of any of the GM diesels with the 6.2 and 6.5 motors. The jury is still out on the new 6.0 Powerstroke. I'd steer clear of that one for now.

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BigRoy -

One think I forgot to mention.

Diesel trucks and automatic transmissions sometimes are not a good choice. They can have a hard time handling the torque that a diesel generates. With proper maintenance and good driving habits, most automatics are ok.

Check out the turbo diesel registry and the diesel stop websites. There will be a lot of reading there on Ford and Dodge diesel trucks. Once you filter out all the brand bashing and loyalty, you will be able to make an educated decision on what truck is the one for you.

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I have a 01 powerstroke and have had it since it was new. I have had zero problems witht the truck and the power and mileage are great. I haul a 22' enclosed trailer for work everyday and its handles it just great. My old truck, now my plow truck has the 460 in it, unless you own an oil field stay away from these. They are fun and powerfull for a gas truck but 10 mpg is about what you can expect, towing is even worse, around 7. Illustration: before the deisel 150.00 per week in gas, after, around 60.00, thats 90 bucks a week, almost my payment! Good luck with the search, I think you will like the 7.3.

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Gissert is correct, if you can use a stick shift, you'll be happier, but value on resale will drop a little. Appears to be that Chevy with the new Allison transmission are the best so far, but not enough time to have a verdict yet. Remember Duramax is a Cummins technology motor.
I am not trying to push Chevy, just giving some info. My choice, would have been a Dodge if I didn't have already too many payments to take care.

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A womans point of view: We have had a 1995 and now have a 2000 Powerstroke F250. I love the Powerstroke! However, I did get better mileage with the '95 - but it was a 5 speed and the 00 is an automatic. We got 19-21 on the '95 and only get 15-18 on the '00. That said I liked the seats much better in the '95 they were much more comfortable and I liked the 5 speed better. But the '00 has the new mirrors that I love and the four big doors which I would not trade for anything.

You will have all the power you could ever want. I pulled a 4 horse alum. trailer with a dressing room full of horses and tack and had plenty of power.

Some of our friends talked us out of the Duramax because it shifts so much when hauling. Also, when we were looking it was about $3000.00 more for the GMC.

Sorry, could not be seen in a Dodge. grin.gif

Just my 2 cents worth.

------------------
Phyl

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Valv -

Didn't GM team with Izusu (sp?) on the Duramax?

Izusu is well known for great diesel engines. The only reservation that I have is the aluminum heads.

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Gissert: I have checked out the Duramax at the auto show when it came out. It is an Isuzu with aluminum heads. They (Isuzu) do have a good record but I can not go with the aluminum heads. Real quiet running motors.

Big Roy:I have friends with both the cummins and the powerstroke. I am impressed with both. One friend has a plumbing business and has 5 powerstrokes. One has been troublesome. He also had a 96 which he had some relay trouble with, that left him stranded on a mountain in Wyoming. Good thing for the cell phone. The guy with the Cummins went to a diesel pickup rally in Ohio. He said that it was 70% Dodge to 30% Ford and NO GM's. He said that he did not see one GM even with the Duramax. They both say to avoid the automatics. Even the one with the cummins is on his third new manual transmission and approaching 300,000, but he drives pretty hard.

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Iceman- Have the Dodge diesel engines always beem provided by cummins, the older body style with the diesel engines can be bought for a fair price. I prefer the look of the new Dodge but if the price is right...... diesel stop.com is a pretty cool web site, has alot of good info- thanks for the tip.

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O.k. I am convinced- manual transmission it will be. Thanks for all the input. Still kicking the Dodge and Ford thing around though. I have plenty of time to decide- the wifes car will be paid off in Jan. and then I will be in the market.

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BigRoy -

IIRC, The Dodge truck have had the Cummins engine since about 1990 or there abouts. If a Dodge has the Cummins engine, it is badged as such on the front fender logos.

The HP and torque numbers got progressively higher through the years. My 2001 is rated at 245 HP/505 Torque. The 2003 models are even higher as they went to a common rail injection system which is much quieter.

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I have a buddy who has a 99 1 ton with a Powerstroke and he went to Montana. He pulled a big horse trailer loaded with 2 bobcats and a bunch of furniture. He claims he got 16 MPG on the way out and he got 24 on the way home with no trailer. As far as power goes he can pull anything he hooks on to. This will last you a long time if you go with a diesel. I know one other guy who put over a million miles on his cummins and just the regular maintenance was he did. Not sure about Chevy diesel but i go with either Ford or Dodge. Good luck in what ever you choose Brian

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I'm not brand loyal and I've owned the big three. The best so far for me is the Duramax/Allison Auto. I have a '01 with 90,000 miles. Power & noise level is very good.

Next would be the Power Stroke (I've not driven the new ones, but the reviews have been good so far as power & noise) I have had several and the reliability, performance, and milage was great.

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