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Steve Foss

Oh, my aching Eska!

17 posts in this topic

Hey experts:

Here's one for you. Just bought a 5 hp air-cooled Eska (Sears), 60s vintage, with so few hours on it the original paint is still on the kotter key holding on the prop's pin.

Problem: The motor won't keep running for very long. Had it out first time yesterday, and was eventually able to keep it running at trolling speed by adjusting low-speed mixture knob to a 4 on a scale of 1-10, with 1 being the leanest. It ran at full throttle whenever I needed it to.

Today, with no other adjustments, wouldn't stay running more than one or two minutes at a time. Had it at full speed to get to a spot and it would run a bit, then not. It would start, run, kill. Over and over again.

Got it home, dropped it into water in a garbage can and started her up. Same thing. Pulled the plug and it was soaked with gas. Dried it off, opened throttle all the way and pulled it a few times to dry out the cylinder, put the plug back in, fired right up, ran for a few minutes, logged down and, stalled. Plug was soaked again. No matter how lean I made the high speed mixture (assuming that it's at its leanest when the screw is screwed in tight), it still killed and the plug was still soaked. Tried a number of mixture adjustments, same deal. And it would only start at all with the throttle wide open so the primary valve was letting in as much air as possible.

Fuel is regular unleaded with air-cooled Penzoil 2 cycle oil mixed 32:1. On motor, it calls for 1/2 pint of straight 30 weight mixed with each gallon of gas, which is VERY rich, and doesn't take into account today's oils.

We won't even go into the sore shoulders and skin missing from my fingers and blisters from repeatedly trying to start the girl on the water. Gotta love paddles, eh?

Thoughts?

------------------
"Worry less, fish more."
Steve Foss
stfcatfish@yahoo.com

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Could be a coil issue. I had a bad coil once and it ran fine until it warmed up and then would cut out.

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A bad coil would also run at low speed but cut out as the rpm's increase.

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Steve, I don't think it's a ignition issue. Lets yank that carb off, take her apart and clean it good. Could have some gum in there from sitting so long.

chunky

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Would a motor that old/small have a coil, or would it be a magneto?

Also, it being air-cooled, I wonder if the plug wire gets too hot. Cheap chain saws never idle when they're warm because the plug wire isn't insulated enough, and it gets too hot.

Also, when it starts to log down like it's going to quit, I can quickly change the high-speed fuel mixture (either lean or rich) and it'll keep running a few seconds more.

[This message has been edited by stfcatfish (edited 08-03-2003).]

[This message has been edited by stfcatfish (edited 08-03-2003).]

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I agree with chunkytrout, take carb apart and clean it throughly, including all jets, orifices, etc.
Then re-adjust screws when in water.

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I'd also clean the carb first. Then quit messing around with the lawnboy oil. Get some GOOD 2 stroke oil, rated at least TCW3. In our Motocross bikes we use Amsoil RS 2000. We mix that at 32:1 for those high rev (12,000 RPM) engines and it works great. I also run it mixed 50:1 in a Mariner 25, a stihl chainsaw and a weed wacker. It works great in all of them. If, after upgrading and porbably leaning out you lubrication, you are still having plug problems, try a hotter plug.

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Thanks for the replies, everybody.

By instinct I'dve chosen a TCW3 oil to mix, since that's what I've been using in my other 2-strokes for years.

But I saw the 2-stroke oil for air cooled engines (Pennzoil, not Lawn Boy oil) and thought it would be better.

If you are an expert, Oilguy, and you say stick with TCW3 rated oil, I will.

I've also used synthetic oils, and my former father in law was an Amsoil salesman. Great oil. Will a synthetic damage an old air-cooled motor like mine, or is it better?

------------------
"Worry less, fish more."
Steve Foss
stfcatfish@yahoo.com

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I suspect a fuel pressure issue?

See if the vent on the tank is open or if it is plugged up.

Then check the fuel line to see if it keeps it's pressure. The pressure bulb may be shot or the connection to the valve on the tank?

------------------
Ed "Backwater Eddy" Carlson

Backwater Guiding "ED on the RED"
701-281-2300
backwtr1@msn.com

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Hey Ed:

The motor has an integral tank with a shutoff valve and an auxiliary hookup for a 2.5-gallon tank. I've run it off both. I can easily see the separate fuel lines for each tank, and they keep their pressure nicely. The problem happens with both.

But since the plug is soaked with gas each time I pull it after it quits, wouldn't that mean it's getting too much gas rather than not enough, or that there's some other electrical spark problem? I'd think if the motor died from lack of fuel the plug would be dry.

------------------
"Worry less, fish more."
Steve Foss
stfcatfish@yahoo.com

[This message has been edited by stfcatfish (edited 08-04-2003).]

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Ah..OK..well if that is the case I would go with a poor needle and seat fit as a likely culprit.

Remove the needle and try a flush and clean see if that does it? Or just shoot straight to a carb kit and get some piece of mind.

An older motor is likely to have shrinking or disintegrating gaskets too. So a carb kit would be a wise and cheap investment. I replace all the rubber hoses as a mater of service on older motors, they chunk internally and cause a lot of carb problems.

Constant flooding could very easily be as simple as a rubber bugger, rust, or dirt floating around in the needle and seat.

------------------
Ed "Backwater Eddy" Carlson

Backwater Guiding "ED on the RED"
701-281-2300
backwtr1@msn.com

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Well, it's starting to look like a carb teardown's in order after all.

Next question: Where do you get a carb kit for a 40-year-old motor? If one's not available, guess I could just get a sheet of gasket material and cut out my own. Done that before.

Umm, chunky? grin.gif

------------------
"Worry less, fish more."
Steve Foss
stfcatfish@yahoo.com

[This message has been edited by stfcatfish (edited 08-04-2003).]

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Lets take this to iBoats or Antique Outboards dot com. They would know.

chunk

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There is a guy here in Fargo that works on older motors, very good at it too. He has a shop near downtown but right now his name slips my mind. Maybe Scoot, Fred, or somebody else knows his name?

The guy has lots of parts both new and old on hand for older motors.

I have his card here someplace I will snoop for it.

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Either Certified Parts Corp. in Janesville, WI, or Brix Enterprises in Brook Park, MN should have most parts for your Eska. Good Luck

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