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mistermom

Reel mower questions for Coldone and others

10 posts in this topic

Mr. Coldone!
I saw that you use a reel mower (you mentioned it in a post). I'm interested in looking at getting one. I did a search and got a ton of data. I am curious however, what you use and where you got it. Also I have a sloped yard and it is rough in spots. Will a reel mower handle a rough lawn? Thank you for your consideration sir.

mm

Sorry Spike. I know this should be in equipment expert info. But I wanted Coldone to spot this and after he does you could move it. I know he watches this thread but not sure if he watches equipment expert info. Thanks

mm

[This message has been edited by mistermom (edited 06-25-2003).]

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If you are looking to purchase new, I know if I had to replace mine, I would probably go with the Scotts American Classic, 18" cutting width.

I use a Scotts, silent type, early 1960's vintage, you may occasionally spot these at yard sales, flea markets, and 2nd hand shops, a quick check for excess rust, bent or damaged main blade, stripped adjustment bolts, or bent vanes will determine if it is possible to restore it to use. Many small hardware stores offer sharpening and adjustment services ($20-$30). A well tuned reel mower is much easier to push than even the lightest power mowers.

I have a rough "natural" lawn, and it works fine. I tend to cut as high as the mower will allow, a properly adjusted reel mower will leave a finer cut than a rotary blade mower. Hills are not as much of a problem, as the reel mowers are light enough to push up or down, and due to the low center of gravity and large wheels are not likely to tip on side hills.

To allow for this subject to be justified on a fishing HSOforum, congratulations! for considering a non-engine powered motor, which will; save you money, reduce fuel use, and mean cleaner air and ultimately cleaner water, that we all can enjoy, Good Fishin!

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Thanks sir!
I have just been mulling it over since your post that said you use one. And I thought why on earth not use one if they work as well or even nearly as well. I like saving money. I'm not a gear head. I don't dig engines for their own sake, just the utility. So if I can do it without firing up cylinders and not kill myself with the effort... Why not?

I will look into it immediately. Thanks again sir!

mm

Oh yes! Nothing wrong with cleaner air either.

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I saw a mower of this type for sale at Menards recently. If my memory is correct it was about $85.

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I have an old Scotts - same model, and if I kept up with my lawn, I'd use it all the time, but I hate yard work as much as I love fishing and usually don't mow until my lawn starts to affect my neighbor's property values. My Scotts won't take on thick, wet, tall grass.

Bought a new one a few years ago and it was dump. Get the old one.

------------------
Aquaman
<')}}}}}><{
Peace and Fishes

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Thanks for the tip AM....and no you can't live next to me.

mm

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I checked at Menards today and the price was 49.99 for a 14 inch mower. At that price it could possibly be a hunk of junk but you never know.

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Home Depot, stocks the Scotts Classic, should retail right around $130. But, I too would recommend, if you can, look around for an older model. The Scotts Silent was a well built, lifetime lasting mower.

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Type clean air gardening or clean air mowing in a search engine and you will find places to buy them online. There is a Brill for higher $$$ that I wish I would have bought. I recommend the grass catcher on the Scotts or Brill if you go that route. Before I had that I started to develop a serious thatch problem. And you do really need to keep up with it if you plan on using this type of mower.

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