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G_man

1750 Crestliner Sportfish vs 1700 Lund Fisherman

8 posts in this topic

I was seriously looking at both boats this weekend down at Cabelas. Both were paired with a 115 Yamaha 4-stroke.

I was wondering what the Owners of each boat would have to say about their selection. I know there are alot of happy people out there because these are two very popular boats and both of them are basically cadilacs that one can't make too wrong a choice on. The price of each boat is very comparible, within $1000, so its a matter of preference over price.

As specific of details as you are willing to provide would be perfect for me because I am a very detail orientated person. My main purpose for the boat will be to fish medium sized lakes with the capability to fish both the big ponds (Milacs, Winnie, Leech, etc) and also the rivers (St. Croix, Minnesota, Ole' Miss). I am also interested in having a boat that we can take some friends out in for a run around the lake on occasion, so it needs comfortable seats and plenty of conversion room. Lastly, the wife needs to feel secure in the boat, as in a very stable boat.

THANK YOU!

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I think both boats would be an excellent choice. It is really a matter of preference. I currently own a Crestliner but if I were but today, I would look VERY closely at Lund for it's better fit and finish. I noticed at the bopat shows that sopme of the components used in the Crestliner didnt seem to be as durable as the Lund. Plus the JUMP Seats on the Fisherman are WAY better than the folding seat option of the Crestliner.

The only additional point that I will make is that both boats are rated for a 150 HP. If you select a 115 you may be a bit underpowered. Most people follow the rule of no less than 80% of Max HP. If I were to seriously consider either of these I would look at a larger HP. The Suzuki/Johnson 140 4 stroke wouyld be a nice fit for these boats.

Good luck!

[This message has been edited by vikes40for60 (edited 06-16-2003).]

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I'm the owner of a new 1700 Fisherman. It has the 115 Yamaha. So far, I'm real happy with everything. If I had one complaint, It's that with the top up, fishing three or more is real clumsy. The only way around would be a bigger boat, and I'm not up for that. The power seems more than I'll ever need, but the 150 wouldn't be out of line. With the 115 it'll troll at about 2 mph forward, and I expect that will improve after the first tune-up as the idle speed could be dropped a few hundred from the factory setup.

Quality is excellent - Good Luck!

craig

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That was one other item I was asking detailed questions about from the reps that they would only answer in general. I was wondering how slow the 115 would troll. Sometimes you have to slow down to 1.5 mph in order to get'em to bite and I was wondering if I was going to need a 9.9 kicker in order to troll slower. I hate draggin a couple of 5 gallon pails in order to slow you down. They always seem to be in the way.

BTW, the Rochester boat dealers seems much more informative and less gung-ho pushy than "my favorite?!?" metro area Crestliner dealer. I'm thinking I might be happier purchasing the boat from over an hour from my home just for the service. And I like the trailer alot better that the Rochester dealer puts under their boats rather than the packaged trailer of the metro dealer. The metro dealer wants alot of $$ in order to step up to a better quality trailer.

Another detail I noticed that I didn't like about the Crestliner is the rain/sun top. The top has alot of clear material in the shade that will let the sun through on those long days when I am trying to get break from the sun.

Anyone having the 'air-lock' problems in the livewells with the '03 Lunds? The dealer said they got that problem fixed but I want to hear it from you guys rather than trusting them.

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My dealer guaranteed me 1.5 mph at 500 RPM. Right now, it's idling at 800 to 900, so I do believe 1.5 is possible after adjustment. No problems with the livewells.

I've got a 55lb autopilot on the front and find that about right-sized too. Lowrance GPS/graph on the dash, and Lowrance graph on the bow. It's pretty sweet.

One thing I have is noticed is compared to my last boat (18 Alaskan) it's quite high performance. Turns on a dime and planes quickly. It's taking a bit to get used to, mostly because it's very sensitive. Light on the controls is a must. Even the trolling motor spins the boat quickly so you need to make sure you're not oversteering.

Craig

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Can't comment on the Crestliner and don't own the Lund, but my cousin just bought the 1700 Fisherman with 115 Yamaha. I spent the better part of a couple days in it and my impression was that it's an awesome boat. My only concern would be the 115 HP; it's adequate, but IMHO, lacking a bit in the giddy up department. I think the torque of a 135 to 150 HP V6 would really make a sweet package.

My point of reference is a Sylvan 16 Pro Select w/90 HP. The 1700 Fisherman dwarfs my boat and I can only imagine that it's much heavier too, hence my thoughts on the HP.

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Have you checked out an Alumcraft Trophy 175? My dad has this rig with a Yamaha 115 and it rides very, very well in all conditions and it has lots of room. It really scoots along too, I'm guessing 40+ mph.

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G man
I was wondering if you would share how much the fisherman would run you?? I just priced one this past weekend and want to compare. email me at jkst@redred.com thanks Jamie

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