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River Pro Boats...Truly Unbelievable!!

22 posts in this topic

I had the privilege of spending Saturday on the water with Dennis Steele, a river guide for the metro area of the Mississippi and the Minnesota River.
Dennis contacted me and was curious as to the fishing here on the Mississippi in St Cloud. I told him that because of the river characteristics I have only been able to fish a small stretch from the dam near the college to just below the rapids near the hospital.
We decided to go exploring and see what the River Pro Boat could do.
Now some of you might be familiar with what the rapids look like in Sauk Rapids. On a normal year, they look intimidating enough, but with the low water, they look almost impassable.
As we approached the first set, I was thinking to myself that we were certainly going to hit a rock or two and probably three. Not the case at all. The River pro skimmed over the rapids without even touching a single chunk of the jagged granite boulders. We continued upstream, going over riffles covered only by a half a foot of water or less, shallows that certainly would not permit a prop boat to travel through and maneuvered with ease around protruding boulders the size of small cars.
After a successful day of fishing, we headed back down once again with ease and without incident.
If I did not like fishing lakes so much I'd sell my Crestliner and buy a River Pro. A must for any serious river fisherperson!

------------------
>"////=<
Gull Guide Service
fishingminnesota.com/gullguide
Brainerd-Mille Lacs-Willmar
Bemidji-Ottertail
N.P.A.A. # 841

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Yup - themz the boat fer me! Working out the finances as we speak - I've managed to sell two pints of plasma in as many weeks! Aym gooinenng ba c ck aga a a a in reeeeel s o o o o o n.... .. . . . . . .

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Did you catch anything? I've always figured that stretch of river to be a captive area for some pretty good fish. There's always someone fishing the pool below the paper mill dam. Did you go that far? A former coworker of the wife's caught a sizable walleye from shore at the flower park.

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I jet to the St Cloud dam from Monticello. What a beautiful ride. Lots of good fishing right below the dam and thru the riffels for about 2 miles. Good area to wade also, just be careful.

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I had a great time and we did pretty darn good too! smile.gifThe smallies were biting along with a walleye and of course I lost a bait to a toothy critter.We noticed a lot of fish on my Vex Edge in the deep water right up along the dam.I decided to throw a piece of cut bait on a jig just to see if they were cats. They were! we ended up landing a couple dozen nice cats between 3 and 10lbs and lost twice as many rigs to the very craggy bottom!Can't complain though it was a pretty good bite.

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Minnesota River Guided Fishing
"fishhead"
fishheadds@yahoo.com
www.mnriverguidedfishing.com

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Seven junked out props last year.

Four more busted up new props chunked & junked this year, that is so far, lots of year left too.

Yup!

I am SO ready for a RiverPro!

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other than the unbelievable shallow water performance, how is the layout and design for the average fisherman to work out of.

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I have the 1872 HiPro and love the layout.The center console is toward the rear of the boat and everything I need is near by.I have always been partial to tiller boats but you get the best of both worlds with that rear console.There is plenty of room back there too.I fish two people in the rear all the time,when trolling or tight linning.Forward of the console is very spacious.The front deck is as large as any and has tons of storage.I have pedestal mount on this deck and run a bow mount.And in between the deck and the console is all open space.Its one of the roomiest boats I have fished out of.You can fish from it anywhere.

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Dave the only safe tilt angle is all the way up here on the rivers I run.

You don't get too far upstream that way Eh.

grin.gif

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It's easily one of the roomier boats I've fished out of. You could literally fish 4 guys out of that rig and not be too crowded.

Fishing with 3 is like fishing with 2 in most other rigs. It's set-up so nice to move around in.

Nice casting platform, huge livewell. You can feel secure with kids in this rig too and I bet they'd appreciate the room to move around as well.

Heck, If you set it up right you could sleep 2-3 guys in their comfortably.

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After the Cat Gathering, room for camping gear is important to me. I had the chance to size up the RP for cargo room, and it could easily stowe a family's camp gear and still be walkable/fishable. Rick's right about the sides - a guy's gotta work to fall outta one of these.

It can also easily tow a 14' aluminum boat with a dad, his son, and their camping gear. Thanks again, Dennis.

Now, a thought. An RP is a boat for rivers. Our rivers are full of islands which are basically public primitive campgrounds. The RP has lotza open floor for stowage. So...this boat is also a perfect river-camping vehicle. Hmmm.

I found a buyer for that extra kidney - now I have to find someone to buy some extra bone-marrow I have and I'll be closer to my RP.

------------------
Aquaman
<')}}}}}><{
Peace and Fishes

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Hey guys, I went down to Elk River Sunday and you were not to be found. What time did you pull out?

BTW, Pete fell out of a HiPro Sunday AM, I have not a clue how he did it, but Gary from the camp ground was still laughing 3 hours later!

I have to come to the library to check messages. So it might take a while to return e-mails.

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Kevin -
Sorry we missed ya! Boy & I were the last ones off the island at about 10:30 am. I'm taking the kids to Montissippi Park sometime this weekend - I'll call yer cell and see if our schedules will ever match grin.gif

------------------
Aquaman
<')}}}}}><{
Peace and Fishes

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Can someone give us a general dollar figure to get one of these boats? I sure would like one, but don't even know if it's in my "dreaming" range or not.

Thanks,

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HawgTide -
Check their site, but the HiPro goes for $16k or so.

------------------
Aquaman
<')}}}}}><{
Peace and Fishes

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Thanks. That's a good deal to be able to fish most of the year on the Miss.

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For the "River rat" you would certainly get more boat for the buck with the River Pro.

A seriously built boat for serious river and shallow lake fisherman. Well built and you have a huge amount of diversity of application. Set it up as you wish, lots of room to adapt to your particular needs and custom applications.

Most of the regions law, rescue, and game enforcement departments are looking hard at the River Pro. I foresee them as the next generation boats for the various departments who deal with varying water conditions. The MN DNR already is sold on them (The wardens love them) along with a few other G&F agencies.

------------------
Ed "Backwater Eddy" Carlson

Backwater Guiding "ED on the RED"
701-281-2300
backwtr1@msn.com

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1872 HiPro, 175 Merc Sport Jet, and Shorelandr Trailer is $18,390.00 FOB Missouri. THX for the support guys! KT

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Kevin, I was hoping for something a little newer than 1872! wink.gif

Seriously, that is a good price and I hope to get one next year. My boat should be dinged up pretty good by then.

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I'm headed to Monticello today at noon. I'll have a several RiverPros available for viewing and demo rides. My plans are to be in Monti for about a week.I'd sure be happy to hook up with fellow FM'ers. My cell is 314 378 2685 Kevin

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I'll be in Monti Fri Oct 10 thru Fri Oct 17. I'll have several RiverPros available for viewing & demo rides. Cell 314 378 2685 THX Kevin

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