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Seabass77

Scales

7 posts in this topic

For weighing fish, not what's one em!! Which kind do you all use and which weight rating should I go with?

You would think the 50# ones could weight anything but then I figured they might have big discrepancies with crappies, bass, etc and are more suited for pike, muskie.

I fish mostly walleye.

Thanks for the help everyone.

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Most scales(spring or digital) have an error of plus or minus 1 to 2% of the total spanned weight rating of the scale.

Therefore,

If you have a scale with a 50 pound span, the error will be .5 to 1 pounds. That don't help you much when you're trying to weigh a 2 or three pound walleye.

If you have a 10 pound scale, the error is only .1 to .2 pounds. Much better for weighing a 2 or 3 pound fish.

You need to have a smaller span scale for the smaller fish and a bigger span for bigger fish otherwise you aren't gonna get much for accuracy.

------------------
"Just a sCRAPPIE CAT, BASSking on an EYE-jerking SUNNY day, PERCHspiring to avoid PIKEological addiction."

Here....Fisheeeeeeee!!

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No idea which scales are the best. I have been asked many many times, "how much does it weigh?" Wanting some type of confirmation or whatever, they get the scale, which they say,,"that can't be right", and proceede to make up their own weight. If you wont be able to trust the scale, i would get a stick on ruler tape on your boat and just use the conversion guide in your regs. Pretty accurate and maybe less stress on the fish?

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Get a grams scale, divide by 454 and multiply the tenths by 16 to get your weight.

The eater walleye weighs 693 grams. = 1lb 8.3oz. (693/454 = 1.52) (.52 x 16 = 8.32) 1lb 8.3oz.

You won't get it any closer then that. smile.gif

or...

L x L x L / 2608 = weight of Walleye

L x L x L / 1600 = weight of Crappie

L x L x L / 1208 = weight of Bluegill

[This message has been edited by united jigsticker (edited 05-08-2003).]

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I have a Normark 50 and it is always pretty close to using the measuring method charts. There is a small adjustment screw internally in the unit to calibrate it. I have checked it against certified scales and if something is 1# or 50# it is very close. I like them and they are quicker and leave less guessing when it comes to the size of a fish. I have a buddy that has the new Rapala 50 model and he had a walleye that weighted 2.5 lbs and he had the fished weighted on a certified scale and it was 2.51 lbs so they appear to be very close as well.

------------------
Grip it and Rip it

IFFWalleyes
I Fish For Walleyes

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Get a Boga Grip, they come in 15 and 30 lb. models. They liplock the fish so you not have to touch or handle them, the scale is builtin and they are one of the few scales that you can have IGFA certified so it will count for world records. Sweet! grin.gif

[This message has been edited by kwkfsh (edited 05-08-2003).]

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I have the Berkley that goes up to 50 lbs and find it quite accurate. I use it mainy for Channels and sometimes for greenbacks. It also will zero the net so U don't have to actually hold the fish if U don't want to. I would only recommend a digital as the spring can be easily fooled by giving the fish a little drop and pull on the scale.

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