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Lindy Rig Question

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I was just looking for suggestions on which type of line I should use on my lindy rigs. Should I get extra tough or what. Thanks

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Kind of a tough question, but I'll throw out some of my own experiences.

If your fishing clear water in relatively soft areas (sand, Mille Lacs mud, gravel, smoother rocks) I think going with a fluorocarbon snell is good. It's darn near invisible, which I think is important. Keep in mind that fluorocarbon line sinks more than regular mono, so the propensity for hangups might increase depending on how fast you're fishing. I tie most of my spinner rigs with this line, too.

In rocky areas, I often go with Trilene XT or another abrasion resistant line. It holds up better and longer after scraping across sharp rocks all day. It also can handle the stresses of fighting fish in that terrain, too.

If the conditions warrant, I sometimes go with line that is 2 lbs. lighter than my main line. Again, the visibility is key here. Also, lighter line allows live bait to act more naturally, especially when fishing very slowly.

I have never tried one of the "superlines" on a Lindy rig. Perhaps someone else can comment on that.

That's my two cents....good luck!

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If the lake is clear dont go with a braid or a colored mono. Think about how they are acting. If they hit everything go short and less snags. If they are hard to get go long and slow to tease them in.

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I've also gone to Flourocarbon for my live bait and spinner rigs. I usually use #6 for lindy rings and #12 for spinner rigs.

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I'll third the Flourocarbon. I like vanish 8#. I've found the heavier 8# is not too heavy due to it's lower visibility factor. 6# would also be good.

As mentioned above though flourocarbon does absorb water and will begin to sink, therefore running your bait lower.

To solve this, I use fly fishing line floatant cream on my vanish after I've been fishing the same snell for more than a half hour or so. Seems to help.

ccarlson

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I use the Stren 6# flurocarbon. The box says it is 100% but I don't think it is. Either way it has performed very well for me. I have never broken off a fish other than a northern. I have caught 3 'eyes between 27-30 1/4 on it and several smallies between 18-20 fishing jagged rock areas.

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This may sound a little funny but I fish Leech Lake quite a bit and I have always used 8# Trilene XL, the problem is I lose a lot of hooks to those 'TOOTHY' critters. About 6-7 years ago I got a little tired of having to retie 3-4 times per hour, I went to the local bait shop and bought 20# Clear Trilene XL and started using that for my leader line. I gotta tell you, it hasn't cut down on the number of Walleyes I catch and the 'TOOTHY' ones don't tear it up so quickly. I know everyone thinks you have to have this small diameter, light line to trick Walleyes into biting, I don't buy it!! And by the way, if you don't believe it works, my girl friend and I out fished Al and Ron Lindner on Little Stony Point 3 years ago by at least 3-1 on Walleyes.

Ole

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OLE, same is true for LOW. We used to use very heavy gear up there for walleye and it didn't matter one bit. For me the lighter line is more manageable and when the bite is tough I am glad I have it. Good point though!

------------------
Mille Lacs Guide Service
www.millelacsguideservice.com

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Scott, you're right, I always start out with a lighter weight line, but I have my heavy duty stuff in the tackle box for back-up.

Ole

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I like Yo-zuri hybrid for leaders. I got a spool for cheap at a clearance sale and have found it to be great leader material. It is in some respects similar to vanish, but in my opinion it is even more abrasion resistant and it's definitely more managable. Says on the spool that it's "100% waterproof". I have never had a problem with knots, (and I have had knot problems with vanish) But the main thing for me is that I have been extremely impressed with its abrasion resistence and managability. It's a great leader line to use around pike. (my spool is 12 lb)

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I have tied many rigs with firelin. Its great. Wont abraid, toothy ones wont bite through it, and I have even put it next to flourocarbon in clear water. You might see a difference when the bite is really tough in clear water but thats about it. Give it a shot.

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I rig my reel with 8lb mono and snells with 10lb/2dia. spiderwire or Fireline. Am going to run the new spiderwire stealth this year. More flexible. I have fished it next to flourocarbon and mono and have not seen a difference. I feel it is a little more insurance against breakoffs. Until it stops catching fish, then I will switch.

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