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cliffy

Abu Garcia Baitcaster

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I have been thinking of purchasing bait-casting reel. I have been looking around and have been focusing on the Abu Garcia EON. Has anyone had any experience with this particular model? I have never owned a bait-casting reel so I know very little about them….I could use all the help I can get. Thanks.

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I'm not sure about the EON. The hubby and I own Abu Garcia's 5500C3's and wouldn't buy anything else. The EON just doesn't look like something I would purchase. It might be a good reel.

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Fishn'Lady

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Cliffy,
I have several Garcia's although not an Eon.
Can't think of one bad thing to say about them!
You won't go wrong with the 4600 series but I can't give an honest opinion on an Eon because I've never tried one, sorry.

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Thanks to all for you input. I still have not made my purchase....still thinking it over. What, if any, are the benefits to a baitcasting reel comparted to a spinning reel? I would be using it to fish for walleyes, northerns..etc. I already have four spinning rods and they work just fine. However, I just wanted something new and I am interested in learning how to use a baitcasting reel.

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Cliffy,

When EONs first arrived they were plagued by fit problems in the cranking gears. ABU tells me directly they've corrected these problems some time ago, so EONs on shelves now should be fine. Also, Cabelas salesmen tell me they're selling very well at the Owatonna store now.

That said, my opinion is your money goes furthest if spent on one of the 4600c models-- C4, C5, or C3. The 5500 models are fabulous reels, but, I feel, they're overkill in general bass, walleye, and most pike fishing.

A little practice will make you a decent caster very quickly. Each summer I convert 3 or 4 stone beginners to a capable level within one to two hours. Forget horror stories you may have heard. Today's reels, with their modern braking systems, are very user friendly. It will help you initially to use a softer rod with a fuller flex. Such a rod is more forgiving of errors in your casting stroke, and will provide valuable feedback as to how you're progressing. And you'll have far fewer backlashes. Save the super-fast, super stiff rods until you've developed a real quick wrist snap.

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Cliffy,

P.S., The advantages to baitcasting reels are these:

*ability to easily handle heavier lines, say, 10#lb test ,and higher, monofilament or super lines. In most cases, it's a nightmare to spin fish with line heavier than 10# test.(Superlines are an exception to this.)

*greatly increased casting accuracy.

*Since a casting reel is, essentially, a direct pull winch, you generate tremendous cranking power. This is very useful when fishing heavy lures, or those with much water resistance.

* A 4600 reel pairs beautufully with a medium/medium light 6 1/2' rod. For the fishing you describe, I'd go with 12# Trilene XT, or a 30# superline.

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You won't go wrong with a abu baitcast level wind but there are a few thing you should know.always loosen the drag when you are finish useing it.Try not to cast into the wind.And don't over fill the spool with line.You can adjust to weight of the lure to prevent backlashes.But being a new user it is going to take some pratice.And you will never have to replace bail springs any more.Go get and start praticsing.
You won't regret it.
good fishin
jimBo

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Cliff- I am no baitcasting expert but I think the thing is to get the right casting rod for the type of fishing you want to do. I think this more important with casting equipment than with spinning. I bought my first casting setup last year and I was somewhat disapointed with my setup because it's not right for what I had in mind. I bought a 6.5 ft medium heavy gand. mtn. IM8 rod and put on a 6501 ambassadeur. I don't know it was just me, but I had a lot of trouble casting anything lighter than 3/4 ounce. So I ended up designating it as a pike rod, (and also the closest thing to a muskie rod I have), and put on 50 lb power pro. It's nice for this use, as I can cast a daredevle or big spinner or muskie plug about twice as far as I could with a spinning rod, but it sucks that I cant cast a medium sized stickbait or crankbait for anything. Maybe someone a little more knowledgable about casting rods could tell us about which casting rod actions are right for which applications. Also, does reel size/structure have anything to do with how heavy baits should be?

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I have 3 Ions reels, love them.

If your seeking a lightweight reel for hours of fatigue free and hassle free casting, they will make you a happy camper.

Casting distances are just phenomenal on them. Once you get the idea on setting them correctly it is very rare to see a FUBAR in the spoon, even in wind.


Ed "Backwater Eddy" Carlson

backwater_eddy.jpg

Backwater Guiding "ED on the RED"

backwtr1@msn.com

[This message has been edited by Backwater Eddy (edited 04-15-2003).]

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Thank you, Thank you and Thank you all for the info. I was at a local sporting shop last night looking at all models suggested in your posts. I am really looking forward to getting my first baitcasting reel and learning how to use it. I am still leaning towards the Abu Garcia EON...but my mind is still very much open.

Now, one more question. This might be very stupid but.... I reel my spinning rods with my left hand....but I noticed most baitcasters have the reel on the right side. Do people like me (left hand spinners) just get use to reeling with the right hand or do they buy left had reeling baitcasters?

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Cliffy,

Lots of debate on this subject. However, as a rule, if you write with your right hand-you'll reel with your right hand etc, etc. Yes...... if you cast with your right hand, you'll have to switch the rod to your left hand at the conclusion of every cast. This, however is a seamless move you'll perform almost without thought. Watch TV shows and you'll see most "pros" doing it this way. Ultimately...do what feels best.

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Chief, Thanks for the info

Next question: I was looking at some different brands of rods the other day to go along with the reel. I really like the feel of the St. Croix and G. Loomis rods. Are they worth the extra cash and what makes them so special? Would a weekend fisherman, like myself, notice the difference? Any suggestions on rods that are similar to the one listed above but cheaper? Also, what size/action rod would be the best. I was looking at 6'6 med action. It may seem like I am over thinking this whole purchase but I dont want to spend a lot of money and then regret it..... Thanks .

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I was the same way, spinning left, baitcasters right. But once I used a lefty baitcaster I switched right there and then. Far less fatigue for me and I get that lure in the water faster, and more often. Much more user friendly for me then the right hand models, especially for cranks. For baitcasting live bait rigs or trolling, whaterver works best is cool, right or left. Yet I find it is handy to have right side rods and left side rods that are leftys when trolling, thats me though Eh.

My favorite crankbait casters are all lefty's now. I have ABU C-4's & ABU C-5 mags and Ions for flinging piggy pulers.

I would consider that lefty option on the ION.

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Cliffy,

Loomis (all models), St, Croix (Avid and Legend Elite), Fenwick (Techna AV)are fabulous rods, but they're very expensive and I wouldn't recommend them for entre' into baitcasting. Bass Pro Shops'Bionic Blades, and Cabela's Fish EagleII are very fine moderately price rods with 100%replacement guarantees. However, I recommend you stay away from catalog purchases until you're more experienced ( If you're local in MN, then by all means get to a Cabelas). Go to a retailer, put your reel on a rod, and experience the combined balance for yourself. As you say, you're just starting out here, so it makes sense to spend conservatively. Be sure to look at Berkley Lightning Rods (about 50$). You can get ALL the rod you'll initially need for 65$ max. Lots of factors govern ideal length, but a 6-6 length offers castability, decent trolling performance, control, and manageability. A rod that can handle lures up to 3/4 ounce is about right.

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Well, I did it. I purchased the EON 6600 with a 6,6 med. action rod. It has been very interesting so far. I spent a couple of hours praticing in the backyard. It has been harder then I thought it would be.....birds nest. I am starting to get good enough that a birds nests dont happen so often.... Any advise on how to cast these reels..........???

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When I first started learning, I made sure I had plenty of room and started casting sideways, and slowly worked myself to cast vertically. Make sure noone is around so you don't clobber them. side ways will also help to get those lures under docks. You'll need to cast overhead, unless you want to burry a cank into your buddies head. blush.gif

Keep the spool overrun properly adjusted, and keep your thumb just grazing the spool. This also helps prevent, (but not eliminate)those bird's nests. You'll soon figure out how much pressure is needed. Use your thumb at the end of you cast to stop the lure.

Practice, practice, practice...
have fun!

------------------
Good Luck!

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Thanks for the info.

I noticed that when I cast side arm...I have no problems and it seems to go pretty well. However, when I try to cast overhead, it sucks and I get a birds nest everytime...so I will just have to keep trying. It still beats working...............

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Ya gotta LOVE them FUBARs huh Eddy? They keep a guy "humble" tongue.gif

Good description Bud! smile.gif

"LUND-MAN"

------------------
"Leave NO Trace"

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Cliffy,

Very hard to critique/advise your technique via cyberspace. However, here are some general tips:

Use a heavy lure (1 ounce,or better)for your initial practice. These will cast better into wind, and they'll "load" your road easier--at least until your wrist snap develops.

Use cheap, heavy mono as it's easier to untangle.

Your thumb should never completely leave the spool. When learning, your thumb is always lightly "feathering" the spool. As your lure slows, and as your thumb feels the spool slowing, you apply gently increasing pressure until your thumb stops the spool.

Magnets and brakes provide only about 60% of the solution. Your thumb is the vital part.

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Thanks for the info Chief. I have spent the last week practicing my casting in my back yard. The neighbors think I have lost it. I get a kick out of watching them spying on me. The casts are going farther and there are less birds nests. So far, I have snagged two trees, the down spots on the garage and scared the dump out of a couple of gray squirrels. I am planning to go to the lake this weekend to practice in a more realistic environment. I am still having trouble getting off a good cast when I use the overhead approach…but I am sure it will come around in time. Thanks again!

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