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Amsoil

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Anyone use Amsoil in their 2 stroke outboards? Some claim that engines run cleaner, more efficient and not much smoke emissions.

My 115 Johnson smokes a lot, and I'd like to try to eliminate that as much as possible!

I see Fleet Farm carries it now and I will be giving it a try!

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I have run Amsoil a lot. Because you can thin it down to 100:1, a lot of smoking and subsequent plug fouling can be avoided. It will not fix poor compression due to wear, but you might extend the life of you're motor before it needs extensive repair to correct the smoking defect. I also think the thinner oil mixture runs a little hotter. I used it exclusively in an older 1970 vintage 50 hp merc. But I also ran split fire marine spark plugs, and it was that combination that finally gave me satisfactory running results.

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Split Fires have been in my motor since it was new. Great plugs.
What do you mean about thin it down to 100:1? How? I really don't feel comfortable adjusting the oil intake....
However, she is a real oil hog at 50:1 as it is!

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I figured out the 100:1 pre-mix you talked about. I will stick with the 50:1 injector oil to be on the safe side. I run some high RPMs and need max protection.

Anyone else try the stuff?

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I have ran the stuff b-4 and it didnt seem to make much of a difference.
What i was told by the guy i bought my boat from, was that as long as the oil is TC-W3 (rating system for quality oils)there is not much difference between manufacturers.
I've heard some guys talk about Koonz or Coons(not sure on spelling) two-stroke oil and they swear by it.Other people like Stihl chainsaw oil. There again its TC-W3. I really dont think there is a huge diff. between manufacturers. I think its more about liking Ford or Chevy(I can here the Ford and Chevy guys already! LMAO)

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If you are going to run Amsoil, why would you not run a 100:1 mixture? That's what makes it a good lubricant, you don't need much and the engine will to run better because of better combustion. I have never had a problem running 100:1 Amsoil, and I have used it in a 50 hp Merc, my 120 hp Force, and in my Toro single stage 2 cycle snow thrower. The smoke you are seeing is unburnt fuel and lubricant, possibly due to lack of compression, poor timing, or some other problem. If you aren't confident at 100:1, then try 75:1 and gradually work you're way to a thinner mixture. On a two cycle carbureted motor, which I think you have, the fuel air mixture is sucked into the crankcase. All rods and bearings are lubricated by a continuous flow of cool gas and oil droplets suspended in an air mixture. This mixture also coats the inside of the cylinder wall on the compression stroke and migrates into the rings. As long as you're cooling system is properly functioning, the motor will run indefinatly on a surprisingly thin mixture of fuel and lubricant. But if you're cooling system fails, the piston(s) will seize up right next to the exhaust port where the maximum heat is, because in the absense of adequate cooling water in the jacket that area is hot enough to vaporize the oils away. So, in my opinion, the problem will never be 100:1, just make sure you're cooling system is always properly pumping adequate water to the engine.

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So how do you tell when you with to thin when it locks up? 100:1 is walking a pretty fine line. The small engine shop I worked at if you wanted warrenty work done on it you had better have been using the right ratio. I don't know but in my opinion I would rather go with the manufature recommendations than taking a chance. I saw way to many units that were locked up and ruined because of people not mixing the oil properly. So what if it smokes it is an outboard that is how they are unless you have a 4 stroke. I go with 50:1 and works just fine for me so that's what I am sticking to.

------------------
Grip it and Rip it

IFFWalleyes
I Fish For Walleyes

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I work for a marine dealer and lots of times if a motor is a little out or warranty and a oil related failure occurs they will cover it if you are running there oil. I have seen some oils make the gas "foam" in the carbs also. Also the manufactures of motors have a way better oil aditive package in them. The include things to keep the pistons carbon free anlong with other things. I would recommend running a motor manu. oil. They put more time and money into the research of thier oil, they want your motor to last. It may not be something you notice now but it will help your motor last longer.

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I was having trouble with some of my 2 cycle motors awhile back and did a search on the net. It appears most mfrs give you the fuel oil ratio of 25 or 50/1 just to be on the safe side. Many say you can thin it out after break in. I cut the mix in half on several of my older machines (25 became 50, etc), and they seem to run much better. I use synthetic oil in all my machines. My snowmobiles with fuel and oil injection vary between 100/1 and 140/1 depending on speed (this is how it was designed). I still use 50/1 on my pontoon boat (fishing is 4 stroke) out of nervousness since the motor is in fairly good shape. Has anyone out there used 75-100/1 on a boat motor for a long period of time?

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To tell you the truth I have used three different brands of outboard oil (TCW-3). OMC, Lubrimatic and Shipmate injection oil. I honestly could not tell the difference in performance, except slightly more smoke from using the cheaper (Lubrimatic, shipmate) oils.

I just feel I want more protection with a synthethic oil after using TCW-3 for awhile. I'm running my motor in upwards of 5800-5900 RPM's sometimes. I will not lean out my oil ratio when I am pushing my expensive motor to the max. I'd rather do what the machine is made to do....50:1. Sure, I wouldn't mind leaning it out in an old smaller block motor. Sometimes you need to do that!

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If your motor is smoking and running rough chances are changing oils is not going to make any differenc unless you are running a really bad oil. If you have been running a quality oil there maybe other problems. Check for your engine running at proper temp, if it is too cold it will smoke and run rough. If it is running rich it can smoke and run rough. Lots of things can cause this. My main concern about 100:1 mixture is that it may not be enough to keep internal parts protected during extened sitting.

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Just for the record, only use 100:1 oil that is rated at 100:1 by the oil manufacturer! That is 100:1 Amsoil, there may be several others that I do not have experienced. Never run 100:1 on petroleum oil.

If you are worried about warranty concerns, then run the motor at 50:1. But most engine warranties are long expired by the time they smoke or run rough anyway and the owner needs to find a solution to the problem.

When I switched to Amsoil in frustration over my old 50 hp Merc, I had many of the same concerns. But I felt I had little to lose. Either do something to make it run well or get rid of it. So I went to 100:1, and nothing bad has ever happened in any of my 2 cycle motors. I have later sold that rig but it still is running fine, and running on Amsoil.

For me, my experience with 100:1 Amsoil has been very positive. It is my preferred lubricant. My 1991 Force runs very well with either Amsoil at 100:1 or petroleum oil at 50:1. But I believe I get longer spark plug life with the Amsoil. I do not sell the stuff so I have no vested interest in the product. In 2001, I logged 600 gps miles between June and September on my rig. No starting problems, no overheating, no idling problems. And only one set of spark plugs all year lon. That was 600 water miles split up on about 3-4 trips per week of short duration, maybe an average of 10-15 miles per trip.

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My 1985 Johnson 25 hp called for 100:1. I think they specified that for a few years. This ratio was sufficient lubrication when running but they went back to 50:1 because the internal parts would start to rust if the motor wasn't used regularly. I ran mine at 100:1 from 1-3 times per week for about 10 years before I went to 70:1. Now after I got a new boat and only use my old one for duck hunting, I use 50:1.

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